Goditi subito questo titolo e milioni di altri con una prova gratuita

Solo $9.99/mese al termine del periodo di prova. Cancella quando vuoi.

This Is Where It Ends

This Is Where It Ends


This Is Where It Ends

valutazioni:
4/5 (141 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
6 ore
Pubblicato:
Jan 5, 2016
ISBN:
9781511323376
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Descrizione

10:00 a.m.
The principal of Opportunity, Alabama's high school finishes her speech, welcoming the entire student body to a new semester and encouraging them to excel and achieve.

10:02 a.m.
The students get up to leave the auditorium for their next class.

10:03
The auditorium doors won't open.

10:05
Someone starts shooting.

Told over the span of 54 harrowing minutes from four different perspectives, terror reigns as one student's calculated revenge turns into the ultimate game of survival.

Pubblicato:
Jan 5, 2016
ISBN:
9781511323376
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Marieke Nijkamp is the #1 New York Times–bestselling author of This Is Where It Ends. She is a storyteller, dreamer, globe-trotter, and geek. She currently resides in her home country, the Netherlands.


Correlato a This Is Where It Ends

Audiolibri correlati


Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di This Is Where It Ends

3.9
141 valutazioni / 44 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    I hate the fact that we live in a world where school shootings happen. I have mixed feelings about the fact that a book like this even exists because I don't want to use a tragedy as entertainment. I have had a review copy of this book for years but never got around to it. My daughter actually encouraged me to read this book because she thought it was well done. I didn't grow up in a world where school shootings happened with alarming regularity but my daughter has and it is something that she thinks about. I found this to be an engaging story and a really quick read.This book is told from multiple points of view while a school shooting is taking place. We see what is going on in the locked auditorium and outside of it as well. This is a tragic story filled with needless death but there is also a bit of hope and a few individuals that prove to be heroes. This book doesn't really get too deep into why the shooting happened but I can't think of a good reason or one that would make sense so I am okay with the decision to focus on the students fighting to survive.The story did have a few problems. Students do call 911 as things start and the police in this little town must have been out having a few doughnuts because it takes them forever to actually get to the school. I had some pretty big issues with that delayed response and I think it made the story very unrealistic. I also never felt like we got to know any of the characters very well. I didn't want any of them to die but I wasn't particularly emotional when it happened either. I did really like the fact that this audiobook was narrated by a full cast. Each point of view had its own narrator which made it very easy to keep track of who the focus was on. I thought that each narrator did a fantastic job with the story. I know that I liked this book a lot more because I decided to listen to the audiobook.I would recommend this book to others. I thought it was a well-told story despite having a few issues. I wouldn't hesitate to read more of this author's work in the future.I received a digital review copy of this book from Sourcebooks Fire via NetGalley and borrowed a copy of the audiobook from my local library.
  • (4/5)
    I feel like I’ve read a lot of school shooting books lately - is this a trend? This one was really amazing though. The bulk of the story (except for the epilogue) took place in about an hour, though it jumped between four different POVs. Very effective, very emotional.
  • (4/5)
    Opportunity, Alabama, even the place name shows the planning by the author. A school shooting is the timely action, but the book is really a character study of those close to the killer. Fascinating.
  • (5/5)
    I could not put this book down. From the first page to the last it was constantly moving forward. I am impressed with the level of detail Nijkamp was able to delve into throughout this book which, save the epilogue, was only ~1 hour. A lot can happen in one hour, but it is certainly hard to capture that. Even if this was set in the midst of a tragedy, it was wonderful to read a novel that captivated how quickly time moves. I feel like I have so much more to say about this book that I cannot find the words for. I highly recommend it to anybody who is a fan of YA and/or gripping novels.
  • (4/5)
    So many school shootings, this book is a timely one. The story is narrated by four different students, 3 inside and 1 outside Opportunity High School, all linked in someway to a student that goes on a killing spree at the school. The story is told in flashbacks as well as present time. As they talk us through the event we learn about what is happening at the time and also details of the narrator’s life, family, hopes and dreams. I cared very much about these high school students and their teachers and wanted to get an understanding of how this type of tragedy comes about. What motivates a high school classmate to become a shooter? How does the family feel? How does a student feel when they see a classmate, a teacher, a sibling gunned down. I think the author did a good job of developing the story, but some parts were a little overdone such as the endless talk of love between two 18 year old girls who would willingly give up their own lives to save each other. I don't know how I would react because I have never been involved in a situation such as this. I found this story suspenseful, tension filled, poignant and heartfelt.

    I couldn’t put this book down! I was compelled to keep reading to find out the final outcome. This book is filled with tragedy as well as hope. I really liked the epilogue. It was very emotional and is something I can imagine the seniors doing. I was crying but I was smiling as well. It is well written for the Y.A. audience (14 ) with themes of family, loss and anger. The main characters all have a sense that they are lacking in some way and are letting other people down which is the way many high school ages students feel.

    I received a copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
  • (5/5)
    "This Is Where It Ends" is a gripping read about a school shooting. Spanning only fifty-four minutes four narrators, whose stories are intertwined, explain in detail what is happening and why. Although a diverse group of students, throughout the book, they each demonstrate bravery, loyalty, the love of family and, in some cases, stupidity and, along the way, the reader also learns about their dreams, hopes and aspirations for the future. "This Is Where It Ends" is not an easy read but I could not put it down. The pacing is excellent, the suspense gripping and the events believable. Unfortunately, the plot is frighteningly real and every parent's worse nightmare. The end is heart-breaking and heart-warming, and finishes with a sense of hope.
  • (4/5)
    I felt like I was there, through all of it.
  • (4/5)
    So this is a hard one for me. Was this a good read? YES! Did I want more and could there be more to it? Definitely. Did that make me like it less? No. I was completely engrossed in the story. Overall I think it is an amazing book that deals with a very tough subject that we unfortunately have to deal with. It completely tugs at your emotions and leaves you rung out. ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
  • (4/5)
    Alternate first-person accounts of a school shooting, including the guilt-stricken sister. The shooter holds a group of students captive in the auditorium; he shoots random and then increasingly targeted individuals. We hear from victims, anguished parents via tweets, a blogger, and the news media. The characters seem cliched and stereotypical but the story is timely.
  • (4/5)
    Working in a high school, this book really hit me in the gut in a lot of places. Could someone have prevented what happened in that auditorium if they had just paid enough attention early enough? The character development is where I think Nijkamp shines. Her characters are beautifully detailed and will stay with you long after you finish the story. Admittedly, I was able to foresee how the plot was going to turn out about half way into the story which is why I only gave the book 4 stars instead of 5, but that might have been what Nijkamp intended for the readers. In either case, excellent read.
  • (5/5)
    I could not put this book down. From the first page to the last it was constantly moving forward. I am impressed with the level of detail Nijkamp was able to delve into throughout this book which, save the epilogue, was only ~1 hour. A lot can happen in one hour, but it is certainly hard to capture that. Even if this was set in the midst of a tragedy, it was wonderful to read a novel that captivated how quickly time moves. I feel like I have so much more to say about this book that I cannot find the words for. I highly recommend it to anybody who is a fan of YA and/or gripping novels.
  • (3/5)
    It's hard to read about school shootings, whether it's news or novels. Even after all the incidents over the past few years, I don't think you ever quite know how to not feel horrified or sad or furious or just baffled at how whatever is broken inside a kid comes out this way. This is a very dark story and if you've been involved with any sort of violence in school, you should probably skip it. I usually can't rate stories this dark with three stars; I hate leaving a story with these feelings when there are so many possible endings in fiction. This writer's voice got to me, though and I thought she did well dealing with a gritty subject.
  • (4/5)
    Told from varying perspectives, this author used this style well. Well written with a superb plot, I liked this book a lot. When the students of Opportunity high school beginning a new semester, they had no idea that within 54 minutes, 39 of them would be killed.Autumn and her brother lost their beloved mother in a car accident. Life hasn't been the same since then. Their father uses his fists to take his angst out on his children. Autumn's brother Ty did not return to school as a student to complete his senior year. Instead, when he came to Opportunity high school that fateful day, it would be with a gun and many rounds of ammunition. As students began to depart after the principals opening speech, shots rang out in the auditorium Systematically picking his targets with those who either actually slighted or with whom Ty held a grude, he called them forth and in cold bloodied fashion shot them. Teachers were also targeted and killed.There were two students who decided to skip the assembly and instead entered the principal's office and searched for their records. When they heard the shots, they understood something bad was happening.Successful at picking the locks and using cutters, these two brave souls silently ushered students out of harms way. This was accomplished because Autumn faced her brother and engaged him in conversation while trying to keep his eyes on her and not out at the crowd.Still, many were shot when it was discovered they were trying to flee. Rage filled and vengeful, Ty sneered and smiled as the bullets hit the bodies of his targets. His sister hopes that being a relative counts for something and that perhaps he will not shoot her as she tries to reason with him.While students realized Ty was an angry bully, no one suspected he would resort to premeditated violence.This book was good for many reasons, some of which were the fact that while there were descriptions of the shooting, the author did not resort to unnecessary descriptive gore. The character development was excellent. This very serious topic was handled well without platitudes and over emotional sentiment.There could be no happy ending, and the author did not try to paint an unrealistic ribbon on the box of difficult situations and emotions.Four Stars. I'll look for more of her writing.
  • (4/5)
    The format of this book was a little tricky and I never figured out who some of the tweets were from but I got use to it and as tragic as the story is I liked being inside the heads of certain students. It was a good angle. I've avoided books on this topic but this was the recommended book via my library on biglibraryread.com so I joined in. As to be expected reading a book like this is draining but sadly in today's world...current.
  • (2/5)
    While I was reading this book, I had to constantly remind myself that this book was written for teens not adults. The premise was horrific and timely; although with Sandy Hook (among other school shootings) I think it may have been a bit on the tacky side. However, like adults, younger teens like to hear gory details about things. This book will fit the bill for them quite nicely.For young adults and adults -not so much. Frankly though the cast of character's were interesting, the mindset and emotional aspects of them all seemed to ring false to me. But again, I have to keep reminding myself that these characters are not adults and would not have older adult thoughts, ideas and emotions. I would have thought that the will to live would have been too strong for these kids to do what they had done.What is very interesting is that this is also a look into bullying and it bears asking just who in this scenario was the true bully? No I did NOT like this book one little bit, but I can see how it will appeal to the younger crowd and perhaps those with young teens in the home. I would strongly advise any parent to read this book first before giving it to anyone under the age of 13
  • (3/5)
    A small-town high school in Alabama is rocked by a school shooting. There are some good things here, but overall I felt the characters were too one-dimensional, the author tried too hard to convey emotions by telling us what the characters were feeling instead of showing us, and the adults were all either absent or deeply flawed, leaving a plucky band of students to save their school. Maybe I'm just a jaded old lady, but when students and teachers are being murdered right and left, it's hard to care whether a character gets a Juilliard dance audition. Basically, all the faults I find in most less-than-stellar young adult fiction. This is a topic that is crying out for a strong fictional treatment, but I've read nothing that can match the incredible nonfiction of Dave Cullen's [Columbine] for making me feel like I am right there witnessing horror.
  • (4/5)
    t first a bit disjointed - there's multiple narrators, and while details of their lives are shared, it's a bit confusing at first. But the plot moves forward inexorably ... And in increasingly horrific detail . A young man methodically locks all the auditorium doors, brings weapons and extra ammo and tells the trapped student body and staff that he is in control. The shock is real and as the shooter begins to actually kill students and teachers, the dread and the sense of despair builds along with the claustrophobic atmosphere of the auditorium. The narrators' relationships to the shooter, Tyler Browne, emerges and secrets are revealed. Well written, emotionally wrenching and painful to read for its straight from the headlines plot, this is a compelling read.
  • (3/5)
    Really 2 1/2 stars. Very disappointing. With all the positive press surrounding this book. I expected something more gripping. I felt like the author didn't delve deep enough into the characters and it was wayyy too short.
  • (2/5)
    In a word, melodramatic. In many other words...The tone of this story skews so heavily effeminate it's distracting. I'm not saying femininity is a bad thing, but an event like this is going to have different reactions from different people, except they all sound the same. It's supposed to be about a real school shooting, but it's so cheesy it doesn't feel real. The narrative is split into the perspectives of four victims in four different situations. One is the ex-girlfriend of the shooter, another is the sister of the shooter, another is that sister's lesbian girlfriend, and last is the trouble-making brother of the lesbian girlfriend (do you see how relationshippy this is?). Two are trapped in the auditorium with the shooter, the brother is trying to get them out, and the ex-girlfriend is ROTC and running for help.The sister, who I guess is the main character because she's the closest to the shooter and has the most to lose, is obsessed with dance. Her dead mother was a dancer. Dancing is the "only time she feels free." And of course she's going to Julliard. Maybe it's because I'm not a dancer, but this feels like cliched rhetoric. See any dance movie or book in the last ten years. You cannot combine "Bowling for Columbine" with "Save the Last Dance". The shooter makes his sister dance on stage, like he's the Joker. Don't you want to mix it up a bit and make her want to be an astronaut?And there's way too much thinking. Four different narratives + limited amount of time (about an hour) means minute by minute breakdown of each POV. In high-risk situations, there is NEVER this much thinking going on. No thinking about the past or "why does he like her and not me?" high school junk. That all drops when you're just trying to survive. Even with the wordiness, the lack of detail is appalling. The author never even mentions what kind of gun the shooter has. Is it a rifle? Shotgun? Handgun? Automatic? That's an essential detail, to know what kind of damage can be done, what the stakes are. I'd venture to say the author didn't research school shootings, instead opting to make a soap opera around a dramatic event.There is so much Lifetime-worthy drama cheese it's embarrassing. The name of the town is Opportunity, and the author never lets you forget it. Lines like "the sky feels endless" and "she looks so beautiful" and kissing a guy during a crisis like at the end of "Speed". Is this really your biggest concern with a gunman? Was there kissing going on during Columbine? Because no one reported any post-tragedy romance. Add in a nice dose of parent abuse, sexual assault, and all the other things you expect from a "serious" YA novel about "serious issues" that belong in a CW show. This is not worth your time. Read "Columbine" by Dave Cullen instead.
  • (4/5)
    Riveting, intense and heartbreaking. The events of this story take place in one devastating hour, such that the reader is compelled to read straight through. The author does a good job of capturing the feel of what it might be like to be a student in the midst of a school-shooting event. She made the story as authentic as possible and did a decent job of portraying the thoughts, concerns, and emotions of high-school students. Having the four points of view was helpful as well. The reader doesn't really learn anything new, but definitely experiences a frightening, unforgettable perspective.In accordance with FTC guidelines please note I received a free advanced reading copy of this book in exchange for an
  • (4/5)
    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. I enjoyed the book it covered a controversial topic and gave us unique points of view from four different characters. It kept me engrossed through the whole book and feeling for the characters. A recommended read.
  • (5/5)
    I received a digital copy of this title, free, in exchange for my honest opinion. Wow! This book left me breathless and heartbroken, but also hopeful. School shootings is always a scary topic, mainly because they happen way too frequently for comfort and almost everyone has been touched by it in some way. As with suicide, those who are left in the aftermath or who are outsiders to the event, school shootings leaves the world asking questions. The number one question being "Could I have stopped this?"But what Nijkamp shows is that a shooting involves a whole lot more people than just the shooter. A shooter rarely wakes up one morning and decides to bring a gun to school to exact revenge on those around them. There is more to it than that. She was able to show this without really being in the shooter's head at all. That is one thing that I find the most intriquing, very little time (if any) is actually spent inside the shooter's head. What we learn about him comes from the people that interacted with him directly, mostly in some negative way or from what the shooter says to the other characters. We have to assume that the character's perspective and the shooter's dialogues tells us the truth of who he is. But, I kind of hope that they're wrong. If not, than they were all pretty naiive to not expect something like this to happen. And yes, I can say that, because as a reader I know all of the secrets and truths that each character had but chose to keep to themselves. And it's easy to come to this conclusion when you don't already have a gun pointed at you and you have enough information and experience. It's called the outsider's perspectives. Besides getting to know the shooter, we are also given the opportunity to get to know the other characters. And they are a diverse group. Heroism comes in unexpected places. But so does cowardice. Not everyone can be brave. But you would think that someone who is closer to the shooter would be braver, instead I found her to be selfish and a bit of a coward. I don't think that the author intended her to be portrayed this way, but that's the way she came across to me. I was impressed by this book on so many levels. But this one is worth mentioning directly. This is the work of a debut author. This is Nijkamp's first published book. And it is written as though she has been in the game for a while. Well written, authentic characters and engaging plot. Flawless. I have never said all of that about any other debut author's work. And yes, I know that just because it is the first published work does not mean this is the first book she's ever written (for all we know it could be her hundredth attempt at a book, this same story even). But it is the first in what I hope is long long publishing career.
  • (4/5)
    This was such a great audio. I loved the multi-person cast. This is such a heavy, dark book, but very pertinent to what’s going on in the world today. It left me teary eyed in quite a few parts.
  • (4/5)
    The Twitter part is confusing and also doesn’t connect well with the storyline. It just help give the setting a mood
  • (1/5)
    Uh...what book did all these good reviews read??? Because theres no way it was this garbage
  • (4/5)
    This book is a must read. It follows a highschool as they go thru a school shooting. It has lots of dialog and gives you insight in what happens during such a tragic time.
  • (5/5)
    Hard to listen to! But wow so good and so important
  • (5/5)
    As a teacher, this book touched on so many of my emotions. This is reality condensed into a book. We hear of school shootings every day. This book looks at the confused life of a teen, who holds his school hostage. He randomly shoots teachers and students as he rants and raves about the injustices done to him. The problem is he feels like he has lost everything, including his sister. We see how much his sister loves him, willing to sacrifice her own life to save her friends and the students she doesn't know. We witness the agony of those outside the school who have siblings inside. We witness the heroes who do what they can to save as many as they can. I sat on the edge of my bed reading this late into the night, putting it down only because I had to teach school the next day. Normally I would read a book like this in one sitting. The emotions it brought out in me made that impossible. I could only read for so long before I had to put the book down and deal with the emotions I was feeling. It was like having to decompress so that I could function once again. This is a book that I will definitely recommend. It is not for the faint of heart and should only be read with a box of tissues.
  • (2/5)
    “‘I wanted to fit in here.’ His voice rises and falls with a singsong cadence. He has the gun in one hand. His other rests on his waistband where, strapped over his dress shirt and slacks, he carries cartridges of ammunition, perhaps even another gun. ‘Instead, I lost everything.’”This read ended up being a major disappointment for me. I started out knowing, because of the subject, it was going to be dark and may hit a few sensitive marks. Unfortunately I never came to care enough about the characters to worry with the situation.The story flips back and forth through multiple characters in different places throughout the school, which could have worked, but they all have some kind of relationship to the others. I found myself having to go back multiple times to remind myself who was who and how they were connected to the others. Overall it just became annoying and contributed to why I never connected to the characters.There’s also a very severe lack of adults in this novel. Where the heck are all the teachers?! There’s a mention of one or two of the teachers, but as the shooter goes about his business where’s the trained leadership of the school staff in all this chaos? Maybe the author thought she could get away with it just being a “small” school, but small, country schools still have the same requirements as other schools. It’s clear the author wanted the teens to be heroes of the story, but don’t turn the book into a no-adults-exist super-teens story.The gunman was another point that was lacking. What motivated his actions? He talks a lot with not much to actually say. He has family problems, and he points out that he was lonely, but nothing even hinted on what drove him over the edge and why he chose to take out his pain/anger on the school. To me this felt like a big cop-out, because there’s always controversy over if the shooter could have been stopped if his depression/bullying/abuse was found out beforehand. Overall, I didn’t like this book. There were diverse characters (how in the world there could be that many diverse characters in that small of a school, no idea, but hey, lets go with it), but the characters lacked any depth. I’d probably skip over this one.
  • (4/5)
    Release date Jan. 5, 2016This was a powerful book about a school shooting that lasted 54 minutes, told from the perspectives of the students experiencing it. What I found interesting was there was no perspective from the shooter, but once the narrators realize who the shooter is you get glimmers of who he was but you never really understand just why he does what he does.This book did pull me in pretty fast I read it in 2 sittings; it kept me interested all the way through. I also liked that there were many races, religions, disabilities and sexual orientations represented. I did have a few problems with how the police were handled though, they took the time to set up tents before knowing just what was going on inside or trying to contact the shooter? Everyone in the auditorium had a cell phone and I just didn’t feel any urgency on their part.My favorite characters in this book would have to be Far (Fareed) and Tomas (the prankster of the school) these two showed so much heroism, especially since they were free, they were both sent to the principal’s office, they weren’t locked in the auditorium with the shooter they could have just walked away but they didn’t, they stayed and tried to help.I felt so bad for the shooters sister to have to see your brother shooting people and ranting about life and you can do nothing to stop him, yet people think you should be doing something or that it’s your fault.I also am not sure what the addition of the tweets was about; I don’t think they added anything to the story at all. (And in my DRC it was big white blocks with the tweets below, I’m not sure what I was supposed to be seeing). These tweets could be cut completely and not lose a single bit of the story.I’ll be honest there was a few times where I thought why aren’t you all ganging up and taking him down, I guess unless you have lived the situation you don’t know how you would react so I tried to put myself in their shoes and I’d probably be the kid completely shut down and too scared to move, so who am I to judge.There were a few things off about the book but they in no way outweighed what made this a powerful story.3 ½ StarsI received this book from Netgalley and the publisher for a fair and honest review.