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It: A Novel

It: A Novel

Scritto da Stephen King

Narrato da Steven Weber


It: A Novel

Scritto da Stephen King

Narrato da Steven Weber

valutazioni:
4/5 (6.788 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
44 ore
Pubblicato:
1 gen 2016
ISBN:
9781508217114
Formato:
Audiolibro

Nota del redattore

Do you want a balloon?…

King captures the magic of childhood, and lifts the reader’s spirit high with his depiction of the shielding power of friendship in the face of evil for a group of grammar school kids. The book breaks your heart, too, floating to the surface the pain kids suffer as they grow aware of the failures of their would-be adult protectors. “It” will terrify you. But read it. It’s worth losing a couple nights of sleep.

Descrizione

Stephen King's terrifying, classic #1 New York Times bestseller, "a landmark in American literature" (Chicago Sun-Times)—about seven adults who return to their hometown to confront a nightmare they had first stumbled on as teenagers…an evil without a name: It.

Welcome to Derry, Maine. It's a small city, a place as hauntingly familiar as your own hometown. Only in Derry the haunting is real.

They were seven teenagers when they first stumbled upon the horror. Now they are grown-up men and women who have gone out into the big world to gain success and happiness. But the promise they made twenty-eight years ago calls them reunite in the same place where, as teenagers, they battled an evil creature that preyed on the city's children. Now, children are being murdered again and their repressed memories of that terrifying summer return as they prepare to once again battle the monster lurking in Derry's sewers.

Fans of Stephen King know that Derry, Maine, is a place with a deep, dark hold on the author. It reappears in many of his books, including Bag of Bones, Hearts in Atlantis, and 11/22/63. But it all starts with It.

Pubblicato:
1 gen 2016
ISBN:
9781508217114
Formato:
Audiolibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Fairy Tale, Billy Summers, If It Bleeds, The Institute, Elevation, The Outsider, Sleeping Beauties (cowritten with his son Owen King), and the Bill Hodges trilogy: End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel and a television series streaming on Peacock). His novel 11/22/63 was named a top ten book of 2011 by The New York Times Book Review and won the Los Angeles Times Book Prize for Mystery/Thriller. His epic works The Dark Tower, It, Pet Sematary, and Doctor Sleep are the basis for major motion pictures, with It now the highest-grossing horror film of all time. He is the recipient of the 2020 Audio Publishers Association Lifetime Achievement Award, the 2018 PEN America Literary Service Award, the 2014 National Medal of Arts, and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.


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4.1
6788 valutazioni / 269 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    Hands down one o the best books I have ever read! Though it took me nearly three months to read it, the time I spent with it has been thrilling. I initially was going to read this along with my niece, however I am glad she decided not to venture into it. Much of what I loved about it, besides being terrified, was feeling the wonderment of fear that I felt as a child growing up in the country. Though I grew up in the 80's not the 50's, the magic I felt at that age was rekindled as I read this book. Now that I have finished it, it will be a bit of a mourning period as I leave the characters behind.
  • (5/5)
    I've read this twice before, always thought it was pretty good... maybe a 3 1/2 Or 4 star rating. I just finished listening to Steven Weber's reading of it. Oh my GOSH, was it amazing! There are so many things I hadn't noticed before, so many things I'd forgotten. This is an EPIC story, worthy of every single moment I've spent on it! Yes, it's one of King's longer stories.... I wouldn't change a thing!!!

    If you're unfamiliar with the story, here's a quick summary: there's a really bad, scary monster/being/presence in the town of Derry, Maine. Sometimes It appears as a wolfman, or a mummy, or a sore-covered bum; but mostly, It appears as a clown. It comes back to "feed" every 27-30 years, focusing mostly on the small children of the area. In 1955, The Loser's Club actually manages to cause some damage to It, and they think maybe kill It. However, in case they didn't completely wipe It out, they make a promise through blood that they'll come back to finish the job if they need to. In 1985, that's just what they're called to do. But can they kill It, now that they've all grown up?
  • (5/5)
    Rereading this novel, I am still reminded about Stephen King's skills when it comes to the narrative of childhood - he has a knack for making you think about your own, as if his tale(s) could conjure up similar life experience in our own, or an echo of it. This is, of course, not including the horror elements, but distancing between the two is necessary if you think about it. Originally, I had read it in French as a teenager. Horror elements had then a bigger impact on me than the underlying elements of childhood but somehow, they helped me cope with my recurrent nightmares. Now, I probably see the background narrative more with the eyes of maturity and experience, and while I really think King's skills lie more in short stories and novellas, this is one of the few novels which conveys a sense of having been worked on, in terms of characterisation but also in its format and conclusion. It's one of King's novels I'd recommend reading a few times, a few years apart, maybe, because it's a different reading each time.
  • (5/5)
    This will forever be my favorite book... most likely.
  • (4/5)
    I liked this one. I really have not read a lot of King's work but this book has been one that I have wanted to pick up for a long time. I decided to go with the audiobook since I had heard great things about the narration and I think I made a really good choice. This was a really entertaining story that kept me listening for hours at a time.This book is told in alternating timelines. We follow a group of characters in the childhood and again as adults. The timelines worked really well with each other to tell the story of the events occurring in the town of Derry and there are some very strange events happening in that little town in Maine. I found that I liked both timelines equally and was really invested in finding out how things would work out in each. I really feel like I got to know all of the characters very well. There is no shortage of character development in this book. If anything, I would say that we are given too much information regarding the backgrounds of some of the characters. I mean this is a really long book and sometimes I felt like I spent hours listening to only learn one character's backstory. On one hand I really liked all the details but on the other hand the book felt too long. I liked that the main characters were all flawed individuals that had things to overcome as kids and new things to overcome as adults. I think that this book did a lot of things really well in addition to the characters and use of timelines. I think that it did a great job of painting a truly creepy and menacing portrait of the evil in Derry. I liked the mystery behind Pennywise and his appearances. There were some truly frightening scenes in the book which I really appreciated as well. There were a few scenes that felt so realistic that I found myself cringing as I listened to the book.There were a few things that I didn't care for in the book. The end of the book felt really weird to me. The ending was surprisingly odd and just didn't seem to completely fit. I was also rather bothered by the sex scenes involving kids. It was just all kinds of wrong and the book would have been a lot stronger without it in my opinion. I did feel that the book was too long. I enjoyed the story but by the time I got closer to the end, I was more than ready to be done with it. Steven Weber did an absolutely fantastic job narrating this book. There was a very large cast of characters that he handled very well. I thought that he did an exceptional job with Bill's stutter and keeping all of the voices consistent. He added just enough of a creepy factor to the scenes that needed it. He really did such a wonderful job in bringing this story to life and I often listened to his voice for hours at a time. I would definitely listen to his narration again if given the opportunity.I would recommend this book to others. It wasn't perfect but it was really good and I am glad that I finally took the time to listen to it. I do recommend the audiobook for anyone considering reading this book because I really do feel that the narration adds a wonderful element to the story. I do hope to read more from Stephen King in the near future.
  • (3/5)
    Was hoping to like this one a little more. It just felt so long and drawn out. It was a little hard to keep track of the constant back and forth with flashbacks, too. I think this book could have been cut way down from what it is.
  • (4/5)
    a great King epic, up there with the likes of The Stand and his Dark Tower series.
    Genuinely scary and excellently written. It was a pleasure to read.
  • (5/5)
    Awesome! Classic King, a must read for all fans.
  • (4/5)
    Stephen King knows how to spin a yarn that gets under your skin. Gloomy, creepy, downright scary...these are the things that It may be described. The ending was a bit too strange and out there for me, but the book otherwise is a classic in modern horror.
  • (5/5)
    I cannot look at clowns the same way. Pennywise is an unforgettable character and the long struggle of the gang against him are engrossing.
  • (5/5)
    So, finally getting around to this one. It's been on my to-read list forever. In fact, this particular copy is my mother's. It and Eye of the Dragon were sitting on one of the shelves in my house for years, I always saw them there growing up, and when I first started reading King, I asked my mom if I could borrow them some time. She let me have both of them, as she had tried to read them some time ago and couldn't get into them. King is not really my mom's style. Nicholas Sparks, however...Anyway, I feel like this is another case of a book finally getting read at the right time. If I had tried to read this when I first got it, I probably would have found it extremely long-winded, but having read it now as part of the BookTube Reading Buddies October Group Spooky Reads, the timing could not have been better.Yes, the book is long (my particular paperback copy weighs in at about 1090 pages). When you first start, it seems like it is going to be excruciatingly long and difficult to keep a steady pace with (which is probably one reason I put it off as long as I did), but that is so not the case. King structures the story so that questions are answered as they are needed. You are vaulted backward and forward in time as past and present meet and nearly merge. The Losers Club has forgotten what they did in 1958, and now that they have to do it again in 1985 they start to remember. The adult Losers are finding out what happened to them back then at the same time the reader is. It's an effective way of keeping the reader engaged.And, of course, there's Pennywise. Pennywise the Clown, Robert Gray, It; the many names of one of the greatest villains ever written (in fact, I think Tim Curry's portrayal is considered one of the top ten movie villains of all time). It's creepy, It's evil, It has a powerful influence on the entire town of Derry, Maine, and It targets children because it feeds on fear. And what fear is sweeter, more powerful, than that of a child?Along with both past and present events, the book is also interspersed with the diary entries of Mike Hanlon, one of the Losers, and the only one to remain in Derry during the years between. Hanlon has done heavy research on the town, trying to find any rhyme or reason to It. He's worked out the cycle, and through his journal entries, we get to read about the other instances of It's influence, It's feeding. Not only does King present the original and current fights of the Losers and It, he also gives the town history of Derry, because the town is just as much a part of It as everything else in the book.This was such an intense read. The way the story is told, there were nights where I couldn't stop reading. We'd hit a major moment in the past, and King would jump to the present. Something vital would happen in the present, and suddenly we're shunted back to the past! Had to keep reading, had to know what was going to happen, or what had already happened...I know it seems confusing, but it really isn't. Just don't forget, the Turtle can't help you, and you can't be careful on a skateboard.
  • (4/5)
    I loved most of this, but then it gets to the end and it turns out the only way to defeat It is with a truly creepy underage sex scene.

    But the Chinese restaurant scene is King at his best.
  • (4/5)
    This book was a bit like a rollercoaster I've been on. It started off slowly, slowly, until you think, "oh god, maybe I'm wasting my time", and then it gets to the top and starts to roll down and twist about and sometimes seems to throw you upside down, and you're going to be sick, and if you're a braver person than me, when it rolls to a halt, you decide you're going to do it all again right away.

    It is a seriously dense book. There's layers and layers of setting the scene, building the characters, placing you firmly in Derry yourself. There's so much background that, like the characters of the book, I think I'm starting to forget a lot of it now that I've reached the end.

    I loved it. It certainly has its flaws -- it gets too dense, in parts, goes too slow, and sometimes it's just too obvious. We get told over and over again that Bill Denborough is the big leaderman, that Ben's the one who can build things, etc, etc. But I enjoy really solidly built characters and really deep world-building, so this was really my thing. I thought parts of it, like the Turtle, were really pushing it, but it was worked in, in little bits, throughout the story, so I could go with that.

    At first I thought it wasn't going to freak me out that much, but then it did. Ohboy, it freaked me out. And now I have to walk to dinner in the pitch-dark...!
  • (5/5)
    One of King's best books.
  • (4/5)
    I've spent most of my life afraid of this story after watching the TV series as a child. I finally decided to read it and only made it half way through before I decided that it is far to scary for me. What I did read was brilliant and scary, the imagry was fantastic and far better than anything the TV series came up with. I would definately recomend this book, but only to people who are far less wimpy than me!!
  • (3/5)
    As with all Stephen King's work, It is at times unpredictable and unbelievable, which is both the novel's blessing and curse. Part of what makes King a master of his genre is his willingness to press against its limits; in It he plays with the sense of destiny that often infuses horror stories, giving the task of destroying an impossible evil to children. He then follows these children through their lives, as the horror echoes forward, undermining all their future (apparent) successes.
  • (5/5)
    This is my second time through It and I must say that I found as much joy the second time around as the first. It is, in my opinion, King's most complete novel to date. He has created and fleshed out some of the best characters in all of his works and draws the reader into their lives almost completely. They, as both children and adults, are all compelling each in their own way.Even with the length of the novel, which is considerable, King has done such a nice job of interspersing back-story and explanatory plot points with tense and frightening moments that I never really found a spot that felt too long and drawn-out. There are plenty of creepy moments, gore and sheer terror for the avid horror buff along with the humor, hope and touching moments that really help to connect the reader to the characters in a way that many authors never really achieve. Overall, I feel that It is one of Stephen King's best novels and belongs in the conversation with The Stand and The Shining as his best overall stand-alone master work. I would recommend It to those who are not very familiar with King as an easy book to get into, just don't be too intimidated by its massive size. Definitely worth the price of admission!
  • (5/5)
    I don't even know how to attempt to review this book...Epic! Brilliant! Genius!
    I do not like horror books but Stephen King is so amazing that I try to read him every couple of years because I truly believe that he is this century's Charles Dickens, such great characters, such powerful stories.

    "It" and "The Stand" are King's two best and for good reason.

    I'm not going to rehash this book but needless to say that it has everything, good guys, epic bad guy, character development, plot, showdowns and a great climax (which is actually odd for King because usually the end of his books leave me wanting).

    At 1100 pages I was pissed because I wanted it to be longer, I wanted it to keep going, I didn't want it to ever end.

    LOVED IT!
  • (5/5)
    Read this again and still think it's as great as I always did. One of Kings best books.
  • (5/5)
    Upon finishing It, I always feel as if I've said goodbye to an old friend, one I only see every few years. I'm a bit sad, but mostly I'm happy that I got to spend what time I did with him (IT). He isn't perfect. He can be quite odd at times, but he's mostly fun to be around. I feel the need to defend him when people start downing on him, and to deride him when I catch him screwing up. I do not condone everything he does, but for the most part, he's a good dude, if a little long winded. I can see why some people can't stand to be around him, yet he reminds me what it was like to be a kid, to be free, to wield that certain magic adults seem to forget how to use. So yes, until next time, I will miss my friend.


    I understand why people become upset, and even enraged, at the scene which concludes the children's story of this book. Eleven years old is far too damn young for such activity. I agree. It's hard for even me to read. But, and this is a mighty large "but", I understand the necessity of Bev's actions. To break It's spell on them, the loser's club had to grow up, they had to "come of age" quickly, and the scene goes down the way it does. Like I said, I don't enjoy or condone the scene, but I understand it.

    Next, I'm honestly quite shocked that so many people believe that It's final form is a spider. It's stated over and over again that It's final form is actually the deadlights, that cold ball of orange light cast off at the edge of oblivion. The spider is only the form in which It has been caught in. Even in It's final chapter, It thinks about how stupid it was to trap itself in a physical form, and how that action would be its downfall. I don't think that half the people who have reviewed this book on Amazon and Goodreads actually finished the novel. I believe most of them watched the movie and called it enough.

    Now on to the last complaint most people have with this book. It ties directly into the Dark Tower series. You have mentions of the Beam and the Wheel, and, of course, you have the Turtle. If you have not read the Dark Tower series, all of this shit will go right over your head. I feel for ya, I do. King's a jerk (a talented jerk, mind you) for doing such. I think Stephen King firmly believes every person who reads his work will either eventually reread every novel, or read them in chronological order.

    Final bit of business; conspiracy theory time. As far as I know, no one else has come across these things, so I could be on to something, or completely fucking insane. Dig on this:

    Pennywise first introduces himself to Georgie as Pennywise the Dancing Clown, or, if you will, Mr. Bob Gray. The "grays" are King's aliens. The aliens in The Tommyknockers are not called Grays, but we're in the King verse and everything comes together eventually. The Grays are finally called as much in Dreamcatcher. In the chapter The Smokehouse in It, Ritchie and Mike see It crash land from somewhere. Not outer space, they feel, but somewhere else. In The Tommyknockers and Dreamcatcher, King never tells us where the Grays came from. So here's my theory. The Grays are the Old Ones from the Dark Tower series. King never discusses the Old Ones other than to say that they were a technologically advanced race of beings. Once again, I may be wrong, but it's something worth considering.


    In summation: It was, is, and probably always will be my favorite Stephen King novel. No matter what problems it may have, it is a terrific accomplishment, and no amount of time will change that. Bill, Ben, Bev, Mike, Ritchie, Eddie, and even you Stan, I miss you already. Beep, beep, losers. Love, E.

  • (4/5)
    It must have been 20 years or so since I read this book. It took me two days, because I just couldn't stop. I was horrified and I loved it. Even the weird parts with the turtle and the gangbang. I might need to read it again to remember what the hell that was about.

    I am currently listening to 11/22/63 which features the town of Derry and some characters from It. Less horror, still very thrilling.
  • (5/5)
    Very intense read. Not for a younger audience as there are some scenes which are too adult in content. There is a lot of backstory which I enjoyed and felt that it enhanced the story and made it feel more real.The characters are well rounded and solid. The town is described to a point where you can visualize it. You get so immersed in the story, that you can believe you are in it.
  • (4/5)
    The master storyteller in one of his seminal works, narrated wonderfully by Steven Weber.Mr. King interweaves several tales of terror in the present, at least the present of the book (1985), and past of the seven protagonists who are faced with evil in many forms. It all comes from their hometown of Derry Maine. It's a big commitment. The audiobook runs for over 44 hours. At times, I wished that some of the side tales were cut. Mr. Weber's narration is great and carries the story over the lesser parts and helps imbue the terror as things go bad.
  • (5/5)
    Ahh, "It". I, or my parents, bought this for me 30 years ago, this very volume I hold in my hands, and I never read it. I remember in high school, my friend Kelly giving me a hard time - "Have you read It?" "No, I haven't read It." over and over. Even on our Senior Trip bus down to Disneyland! I think my friend Sandy's sister Deb borrowed It from me, not returning it for years! Then in college, we watched the mini-series on television. Tim Curry scared the hell outta me! And my old roommate Felix and I would torture each other, often, trying to adopt his evil voice and creepingly utter "We all float down here Georgie!" Yeesh, still gives me the creeps...30 years passed from then till now for me! 27 years go by in the book for the Losers! Sort of creepy right there...Great first sentence! "The terror, which would not end for another twenty-eight years-if it ever did end- began, so far as I know or can tell, with a boat made from a sheet of newspaper floating down a gutter swollen with rain." Great last paragraph of Chapter 1 too! And the rest of the set up in the first 142 pages is pretty damn good! They get the call and they gotta go!It's such a good story! Derry and its history, the Turtle, the Barrens, Mr. Bob Gray a.k.a. Pennywise the Dancing Clown (always Tim Curry in my mind's eye!). The seven kids, then and now. After spending so much time with them all, I find that I'm going to miss them quite a bit. I actually let out a sad, deep sigh as I read the last page. Yup, I finally read it/It..."Beep-beep , Richie." ..."Hi-yo Silver, AWAYYYYY!"
  • (5/5)
    Oh how much I loved this book. No idea how many times I have read it, but it must have been at least 3 times and I am sure I will read it again.

    This is one of my favourite books by King. Love the way he describes how the friendship between the children evolve. He makes them so real. How alone they felt in their guest and later when they meet as adults. Interesting to see how they have changed.

    Yes I must re read soon. Love love Love it!
  • (4/5)
    This was some messed up shit. I thought reading a book about a clown would make me realize just how irrational my fear of them is. Nope. Uh uh. I now know with absolute certainty that fear of clowns is the most natural, rational thing in the world. Thank you Stephen King.
  • (5/5)
    This is my first horror book... and the five stars(i re-edited my four star rating to a five lately) i've given to it are not at all based on the scaring or creeping abilities of the book, though the book really is creepy at some points but for me atleast i think its always hard to be really scared from a book cause you know in the back of your mind that this is not real, its fiction. So i was telling you why actually i gave it five stars. I just love the characters and their conversations and the world building which surrounds them.
    This book is narrated beautifully, all credit to Mr. King..He really binds the reader (though too descriptive sometimes) , especially in the 'childhood' sections of the book.
    It really is long, but it will touch your heart before the last page is turned. The friendship of six children facing their personal fears via a common evil which terrifies the whole town is a gratifying plot to read.
    However, i must say the ending is a bit less satisfactory than the whole novel and an unnecessary scene at the end of the book might disturb you.Nonetheless the book is quite a read. I recommend it completely to all 'pulp' and 'literary' readers. It has something for everyone.

  • (1/5)
    This is the last Stephen King novel that I ever read. Way too much of everything, pages, words, description, too too much.
  • (4/5)
    Stephen King is one of my favorite authors; I don't think you have a scarier book out there than his The Shining or Salem's Lot. However, this is one of those doorstopper length King books. I frankly think The Stand suffered from bloat and he probably shouldn't have restored the cuts as he did once he had the editorial power to do so, and I think most of his later books suffer from that lack of editing, which is why I tend to prefer his earlier, tauter novels like those mentioned above. It comes in at over a thousand pages in paperback, but though I never found it to drag like The Stand and was never tempted to set it aside, I do still think the middle could have used some tightening. Also, as with King's later books, there is a gross out factor here (that stopped me dead with his novel Dreamcatcher.) His novel It notably contains a sex scene among 11-year-old children (and it was unnecessary as well as making no sense to me these children would do that). Nevertheless, there's a lot I loved about the novel--particularly the theme of friendship. The book weaves between the past, set in the 1950s in the town of Derry, Maine and a present 28 years later among seven characters. King excels at creating children characters and at evoking the terrors of childhood both mundane and supernatural and plenty of scenes are genuinely scary. I thought Pennywise one of his most original and scary monsters. I loved how the plot is structured in a way to build suspense as it switches from past to present. So many lines are evocative in their imagery. I did find parts of the novel moving, and might have despite its flaws given it a top rating had I not found the resolution disappointing.
  • (5/5)
    I don't know that I've ever finished a Stephen King book that I really liked without feeling melancholy. This book was no exception. Although it was little more than a rewrite of The Stand with a mishmash of Tolkien's Lord of the Rings thrown in, I ended up loving the characters so much that I was sorry to see them go.I can certainly understand some of the negative comments and reviews (SPOILER ALERT!!) ... the sexual scene near the end of the book was ... unusual... and a bit offputting, and not something that you would expect from a group of 11 year-olds.Nonetheless, I'm guessing that this will go down as a King classic for me joining The Stand, Salem's Lot and Duma Key.