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438 Days: An Extraordinary True Story of Survival at Sea

438 Days: An Extraordinary True Story of Survival at Sea

Scritto da Jonathan Franklin

Narrato da George Newbern


438 Days: An Extraordinary True Story of Survival at Sea

Scritto da Jonathan Franklin

Narrato da George Newbern

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (40 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
7 ore
Pubblicato:
Nov 17, 2015
ISBN:
9781442396029
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

438 Days is the miraculous account of the man who survived alone and adrift at sea longer than anyone in recorded history-as told to journalist Jonathan Franklin in dozens of exclusive interviews.

On November 17, 2012, Salvador Alvarenga left the coast of Mexico for a two-day fishing trip. A vicious storm killed his engine and the current dragged his boat out to sea. The storm picked up and blasted him west. When he washed ashore on January 29, 2014, he had arrived in the Marshall Islands, 9,000 miles away-equivalent to traveling from New York to Moscow round trip.

For fourteen months, Alvarenga survived constant shark attacks. He learned to catch fish with his bare hands. He built a fish net from a pair of empty plastic bottles. Taking apart the outboard motor, he fashioned a huge fishhook. Using fish vertebrae as needles, he stitched together his own clothes.

He considered suicide on multiple occasions-including offering himself up to a pack of sharks. But Alvarenga never failed to invent an alternative reality. He imagined a method of survival that kept his body and mind intact long enough for the Pacific Ocean to toss him up on a remote palm-studded island, where he was saved by a local couple living alone in their own Pacific Island paradise.

Based on dozens of hours of interviews with Alvarenga and interviews with his colleagues, search and rescue officials, the medical team that saved his life and the remote islanders who nursed him back to health, this is an epic tale of survival, an all-true version of the fictional Life of Pi. With illustrations, maps, and photographs throughout, 438 Days is a study of the resilience, will, ingenuity, and determination required for one man to survive fourteen months, lost at sea.
Pubblicato:
Nov 17, 2015
ISBN:
9781442396029
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Based in Santiago, Chile, Jonathan Franklin regularly reports for The Guardian, Washington Post, National Geographic and Esquire. He also works with the team at 'Retro Report' producing documentaries broadcast by the New York Times. Franklin's books include The 33, the exclusive account of the Chilean miners trapped nearly a kilometres underground, and 438 Days, the astonishing story of a fisherman stranded at sea for fourteen months.

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Amazing story of survival! Not my typical read but really enjoyed reading about the courage that some people possess.
  • (2/5)
    I got this book as part of a Book Club read, but read only 100 page + pictures, (267 page book) by which time I'd had enough. Very sympathetic for Alvarenga, but can only take so much of pain & suffering, when I already know the outcome and the book was often very slow.This book details the trauma that Alvarenga went through to feed himself, remain semi-healthy and maintain his sanity, during his 6,000 miles of drifting from Mexico to the Marshall Islands. His determination and will to live, his inventive ways to survive, kept him alive.
  • (4/5)
    "What could be worse than being alone at sea?...What further suffering could there be than this?"By sally tarbox on 17 June 2017Format: Kindle EditionAn astonishing true-life adventure of a fisherman lost at sea for fourteen months.Salvador Alvarenga, an El Salvador native, worked for a small fishing concern in Mexico. When his normal partner was called away, he engaged a rookie local lad as his mate as they set off in a 'banana boat' - "no cabin or roof, just a long, narrow canoe-shaped boat." Overfishing required them to travel further out - and when a storm blew up and their engine died, they were swept out into the Pacific.The dire conditions are brought to life: storms when the deck was knee-deep in water - and stretches of dry weather when they were on minimum water rations. Grabbing passing rubbish gave them empty containers for storage; in the unrelenting heat they sheltered in the icebox. And they subsisted on fish - snatched fromn the sea, and eaten raw or dried; and turtles ands seabirds.The difference in the men's emotional strength becomes apparent, as young Ezequiel Cordoba starts to give up, unable to stomach the food and thinking of death, Alvarenga continues to fight to survive as the ship drifts in the Doldrums at a mile an hour...Washing up eventually in the Marshall Islands, 9000 miles away, this is an unputdownable narrative.
  • (4/5)
    438 Days retells the story of the longest duration castaway in known history. Many castaways die within a week or two, rarely some will make it few months. To go for over a year is incredible. It happened in 2013-2014 when a Mexican fisherman drifted across most of the Pacific ocean. There were some doubts raised initially but everything checked out as accurate. Franklin's retelling is quite excellent, though nothing beats a first person account, this is an official version based on exclusive interviews. I've read a few castaway stories from different periods of history, Alvarenga's is different for one big reason: trash. He continually found trash floating on the surface that helped him survive, amazing.
  • (5/5)
    Wow what an amazing and inspiring tale of survival. Epic!
  • (5/5)
    This was an excellent book. Such strength of the human spirit.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent book. Being some who has suffered from depression all my life it has helped me to understand the need to fight the suicidal thoughts that are married with depression. I recommend anyone feeling blue from this current pandemic shutdown to read this book to put perspective back in their own situation.
  • (4/5)
    It would a miracle to not go crazy if one ever finds oneself in the middle of the ocean alone and without supplies!
  • (5/5)
    Based on hours of interviews with Alvarenga and his rescuers, this book didn’t grab me right away but I got sucked in once that storm hit. I felt like I was there, the descriptions were vivid and scary. Interspersed with the story are snippets of information from oceanographers, doctors, earth science specialists, and climate specialists and other people who have survived in crazy conditions, which really added to the story by making it educational as well as entertainingSomehow Alvarenga surived for 14 months adrift at sea.  He started out in Mexico and finally washed ashore in the Pacific Islands.  Relying on his wit and his amazing ability to figure things out he learned how to fish with no hooks, store water and even catch birds. By scavenging trash that floated by and improvising he figured out how to survive, but Alvarenga’s greatest feat was staying sane under these crazy conditions. I have read many stories on survival but this tale will stick with me.  Alvarenga's will to survive and his extraordinary ingenuity really got him through in the toughest conditions. It really gives you a new perspective on life and a new appreciation for everything you have.
  • (4/5)
    Unbelievable courage, creativity and skill!This story of marine survival opens with a lengthy introduction to Salvador Alvarenga before the storm drove his disabled boat deep in the open Pacific. Franklin’s careful and detailed research is obvious from the start. His revelations at times, however, seemed tedious and overdone as he droned on and on about the fishing village and the fishing culture. His purpose, of course, was to provide Alvarenga’s personal background, show his ability to overcome adversity, highlight his love and seeming fearlessness of the sea and his strange dietary proclivities. Eating raw fish didn’t start with the need to stave off starvation. His friends describe a time when Alvarenga thought a take-out meal order was too long in arriving. He reached into the bait pail, pulled out a hand-sized half-frozen sardine, rolled it up in a tortilla and munched away on the raw fish.The fateful day began with his usual fishing partner unable to go out on the boat. An inexperienced young man, Ezequiel Cordoba was signed up for the quick trip out to the deep waters. Warned of an impending storm, Alvarenda quipped, “I am going with this new guy, but I will be back in time for the party.”He loaded his boat with ample supplies in the event a return trip was delayed. In a scene reminiscent of Sebastian Junger’s, “The Perfect Storm” all the best laid plans of man are nothing against the power of Mother Nature.You feel the sea roil and the winds howl. You feel Cordoba’s seasickness and fear. As the storm builds with rapid intensity, they cut loose the 2-mile long fishing line and head toward shore, nearly making it to safety. Incredible bad luck and perhaps the lack of advance equipment safety checks leave the two men stranded with a disabled motor, knife, machete and a small open-topped fish box drifting out to sea at the mercy of the ocean currents.There is no question by the end of the book Alvarenda has proved he was the right man with the right credentials to survive this long voyage. His life struggles in the past help him hone his survival strengths. It is unimaginable how anyone can stay psychologically and physically capable of enduring over 14 months alone at sea in a 25 foot boat.Choosing to narrate this story in the third person was somewhat distracting but overall the story is so amazing it didn’t matter in the end. You feel so sad for the young sailor who felt lost when they left the shore and feared for his life long before the ship faced true danger. Despite Alvarenga’s best efforts to inspire and keep the young man alive, Cordoba was unable to overcome the odds.My pre-conceived perceptions of open ocean marine life were toppled. It was shocking to learn that despite its size, the Pacific has become a garbage dump.It was hard to rate this book. The story, overwhelming in its reality, seemed to drag in places. I finally decided on 3.5 stars. A worthy read.Share this: