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Luckiest Girl Alive: A Novel

Luckiest Girl Alive: A Novel

Scritto da Jessica Knoll

Narrato da Madeleine Maby


Luckiest Girl Alive: A Novel

Scritto da Jessica Knoll

Narrato da Madeleine Maby

valutazioni:
4/5 (279 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
11 ore
Pubblicato:
May 12, 2015
ISBN:
9781442380516
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

HER PERFECT LIFE
IS A PERFECT LIE.

Ani FaNelli seems to have it all: a glamorous job at a glossy magazine; an enviable figure with the wardrobe to match; and a handsome fiancé from a distinguished blue blood family. But Ani FaNelli is an invention, that veneer of perfection carefully assembled in an attempt to distance herself from a shocking, sordid past.

As her wedding draws near, a documentary producer invites Ani to speak about the chilling incident that took place when she was a teenager at the prestigious Bradley School. Determined once and for all to silence the whispers of suspicion and blame, Ani must weigh her options carefully, when telling the whole truth could destroy the picture-perfect life she's worked so hard to create.

With a singular voice and a twist you won't see coming, Luckiest Girl Alive explores the deep-seated desire to fit in and the unbearable pressure that so many women feel to "have it all." Ani FaNelli is a complex and vulnerable heroine-one whose sharp edges protect a truth that will move, scandalize, and surprise you.
Pubblicato:
May 12, 2015
ISBN:
9781442380516
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Jessica Knoll is the New York Times bestselling author of Luckiest Girl Alive, which has been optioned for film by Lionsgate with Reese Witherspoon set to produce. She has been a senior editor at Cosmopolitan and the articles editor at Self. She grew up in the suburbs of Philadelphia and graduated from The Shipley School in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania, and from Hobart and William Smith Colleges in Geneva, New York. She lives in Los Angeles with her husband and her bulldog, Beatrice. The Favorite Sister is her second novel.

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279 valutazioni / 80 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Uncomfortable, and well-done!
  • (2/5)
    I’m not sure how I feel about this book. Once I started it, I had to finish it, but I didn’t like or identify with any of the characters, and thought there were WAY too many CRAZY dramatic plot points to be anywhere near realistic. Yet…as I said, I had to finish once I started, and I’m not afraid to abandon a book I’ve started if it’s just no good. So maybe it’s like a bad reality show… you don’t care about the outcome and think the drama is all for show, but you’re sucked in and have to see it through.
  • (4/5)
    I loved Ani's voice in this. Her snarkiness was so funny and very entertaining. This story switches back and forth from when Ani is 14 to Ani as an adult. The story of the 14 year old was my favorite. I was really interested in what was happening to her. The reader knows something traumatic happened to her as a teen, but when it was revealed, it was very compelling. I enjoyed reading this book.
  • (4/5)
    A little bit Gone Girl, a little bit Prep, and a little bit We Need to Talk About Kevin. Chick lit with a dark side.

    Would not recommend for people with sexual assault triggers or aversions to somewhat graphic sex and violence.
  • (4/5)
    Luckiest Girl Alive is a tough read, I found myself pacing how much I read because it's very heavy and emotional. Ani has worked toward her planned out perfect life as a sort of revenge for events that happened in high school. The story goes between modern Ani getting ready for her wedding and a documentary about what happened at Bradley, the private school she attended and didn't fit into, and the time while she was at school leading up the the event. The event is the mystery of the story and I didn't see it coming at all. This was a powerful book for me and I was very surprised to see the mediocre rating on here. I blame the title, cover, and the fact that it's pushed as another new Gone Girl. It's not that at all. I can see the comparisons of Jessica Knoll writing being similar to Gillian Flynn because it is sharp and raw, but story wise, it's way different. Luckiest Girl Alive takes on two big topics, rape culture and school shootings. I felt they were handled very well and showed the emotional rawness Ani experienced during the events and after trying to keep her perfect life together so she can prove her innocence and worth. The ending was a little jumpy and skipped over details, but nothing so major where you couldn't make the obvious conclusion on your own. Highly recommend, just expect it to be dark and upsetting at times.
  • (4/5)
    When we first meet Ani she is a high maintenance pain in the rear who is about to get married. Her days are filled with banal obsession about her appearance. I almost gave up on the book but then we get to meet the real "Ani" who was once TifAni. TifAni was a girl who struggled to crack her way into a high school clique that had little use for her. The high school tragedy that unfolds in TifAni's past is a dark tale that she cannot escape no matter how she tries to reinvent herself. I had no idea what this book was even about for the first 100 pages. I was about to give up but then I finally reached the meat of the story which is the part that takes place when TifAni was in high school. There is a good cautionary tale in here about tying to fit in with the wrong people. I never really understood TifAni's relationship to her fiance and how she really felt about him. The rocky beginning and the abrupt ending blunted some of my enjoyment of the book.
  • (4/5)
    Fun read. Enjoyable. Quick!!
  • (3/5)
    A driven and seemingly successful young woman seems to have it all: a handsome and wealthy fiance who loves her, a great job in New York City, and deep pockets available for planning her upcoming wedding. Her inner dialogue and behavior toward others, however, shows how superficial she really is. She is obsessed with how others see her, she is in constant competition with others, and is simply not happy. Her fiance treats her like a pet he has rescued and she secretly wishes for someone in her life who truly "gets" her.Her problems seem to stem from some tragic incidents which occurred when she was in high school; however, her need to please was there long before that. She was determined to fit in with the popular crowd and was willing to do almost anything to be included in their group. She is thrust back into reliving past events when she is asked to participate in a documentary taking place at her former high school.Even though the story seemed to be tied up in a bow, I still felt the ending was slightly nebulous simply for the fact that she is a skilled liar and manipulator. I felt this made her an unreliable narrator to the story and it left me with doubts about her and her version of the story, as well as guilt for doubting her, considering what she had been through. I felt pulled between being devastated for her while at the same time still not liking her one bit.Interesting story with multiple twists.
  • (5/5)
    You have to hate the main character in this novel from the very start. There were moments that I felt sorry for Ani, and eventually you come to learn why she is the way she is, but having finished I still can't say that I liked her. In fact, I loved to hate her, which means that Knoll did her job. The reader truly believes they understand the story and what's going on until a left hook about 3/4 the way through. This left hook is what made me rate this book 5 stars. Amazing and unable to predict, lovers of Gillian Flynn and Laura McHugh will throughly enjoy this book.
  • (3/5)
    I don't even know what to think. I like the book, but it definitely keeps you wondering where it will go next. This book will stay with me for awhile.
  • (2/5)
    *My brain has never been able to hold onto the rules of punctuation, it doesn't really bother me in the least. If it will bother you, don't read any further, certainly don't complain to me about it unless you want to be my personal editor. You've been warned. Smiley face!!
    **AS ALWAYS SPOILERS ARE SUBJECTIVE READ AT YOUR OWN RISK.

    I think I definitely need to reed some more chipper books in the near future. I feel like I keep writing reviews for books where every character sucks at being human, no matter how large or small a part they play. This is one of those books. Now I understand that not all books require likable narrators and call me demanding but I do prefer books where fucking someone is like able. This is not one of those books. This book repeatedly refers to Catcher in the Rye/Salinger/Holden Caulfield. Which is pretty perfect really, honestly I read CIR back in high school and remember little to no specifics about the story all that has stuck I remember snooty east coast private school, NYC, and thinking Holden Caulfield was the an obnoxious, pretentious, self-absorbed little shit. So basically what I'm saying is that on a likability scale ranging from Winnie the Pooh to Holden Caulfield pretty much everyone in this story is hovering around the Holden zone. There's a cover blurb on this book's jacket that says something about TifAni's (the main character) redemption. NOPE! Big NOPE. This character is a psychopathic bitch at the beginning of the book and she's a psychopathic bitch when the book. This is saying a lot in a book sprinkled with rapists and school shooters. I'm throwing down the word psychopath as a hyperbolic descriptor for a a character who is really just a self absorbed snotty twat (although she is very much those things as well) I use the term psychopath in a literal, bust out your dsm-V and access how 'Ani' meets most every clinical criteria of being a psychopath. Her personality is every bit on par with the (book defined) psychopathic student who did end up being a school shooter. She doesn't even deny the fact that she too could have been in on the shooting had the shooters presented her with the opportunity. Which really takes this Ani bitch to a whole new level because female mass shooters are few and far between, women who plan shootings in a school enviroment are even rarer, teenage females who commit mass shootings in schools the attend (where they know the people they are shooting at) is almost statsistically non-existent. Oddly enough this is something the forensic psychologist (actual book character) never bothers to tap on. In addition to all of this which is all pretty bad. The entire plot of this book is a great big mashup of Gossip Girl meets Columbine with some gang date rape mixed in. Although the awful thing is the author creates this character who gets raped by three boys but only really cares about 1 of the guys because she like totally wants the one guy even if she was way unconscious when he took her virginity and then one of the other guys was like way hot so that makes sex without consent not so bad but the third guy, Dean, she totally didn't have the hots for him so that was just rape rape rape. There's more of this expressed throughout the book but its all actually pretty nauseating. There's a scene where a college girl insists that a guy screwing a blacked out girl isn't rape because what if the blacked out girl wants it. WTF? Blacked out girls don't want anything they're fucking unconscious?!?! Worse there's a cop in this scene who giggles at this and then agrees that it can be hard to know. Oh and the main character's mother responds to learning about her daughter's rape by being ashamed of her daughter because her daughter wasn't actually raped just slutty. So basically the message this book sends out is "if you get raped you should probably tell no one because even your own mother won't side with you." FUCKING AWESOME!! The author is just horrible with dealing with any of this. Also be prepared if you are over thirty, have children, have a 27" or larger waist and wear anything other than the the absolute highest end of high end clothing then this author says your nothing. I don't know whether she was trying to be ironic or just as awful a human being as her characters but if she was trying for ironic it didn't quite work. I gave this book it's second star because in spite of my not really liking the book I don't think the author is a bad storyteller so much I think she just told a bad story, if that makes sense.
  • (3/5)
    First of all, who would spell their name TifAni FaNelli - ridiculous; although she does marginally improve it by changing it to Ani, which MUST be pronounced "Ah-nee." I suppose there really are people like this in the world, unfortunately. There are reasons why Ani is presented as such an unlikable character - she has endured some very, very bad things. I finished this book, but I didn't really care for it.
  • (4/5)
    This was a good read. I thought it ended well.
  • (4/5)
    It was a Good story I enjoyed it very much!
  • (4/5)
    a little draggy initially but the pace picked up along the way. kept wanting to come back to it every free moment i had
  • (5/5)
    Page turner (or phone battery drainer, your pick). Great book, finished it in only a few days because I couldn't stop listening.
  • (5/5)
    Had my attention the entire time. I thought it was I really good an suspenseful book and the writing was perfect at painting a picture in my head. (I struggle with that with a lot of books). There are some difficult chapters that some may find uncomfortable as it deals with certain traumas, but if you can get past that it is certainly a good read.
  • (4/5)
    The voice of the character felt very real and developed. At first you think she’s a bitch honestly, then you start to reveal the folds of truth and damage underneath that created her to be this way. Then you see her progress And suddenly you cheer her on!
  • (5/5)
    Enjoyable! It’s sucks you in! Every twist is completely unexpected and you don’t see them coming
  • (4/5)
    Dark and depressing, yes but, oh so good. Great author whose books are top shelf, in my opinion. I listened to another book of hers, The Favorite Sister. I really liked this one very much as well. Jessica Knoll really knows how to dig deep into the heart, the deep dark heart of things until the oozing mess of it all bubbles up to the surface. Boy, if only, if only I had that kind of talent!

    Excellent choice of narrator as well, who does a top notch job.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! Ani seems to have the perfect life even though she is miserable and it's so interesting to try and figure out who is good and who is bad. It's a page turner and held my interest!!
  • (4/5)
    4.5 stars

    I can't write anything. I don't want to even hint at what this is REALLY about. It was good. It started out like a book that was NOT in my "wheelhouse" and then after 200 pages or 11 chapters - KA-BLAM. It even ends right.
  • (4/5)
    This was not the best book but I found it very interesting. The setting of Philadelphia was very familiar and I enjoyed picturing all the places mentioned in the book. It covered a lot of familiar topics such as; eating disorders, rape, school shootings and bullying. The main character, Ani, is very unlikeable and calculating. Knoll does the mean-girl portrayal very well but I think she took on too many issues. I still found it entertaining!
  • (3/5)
    It was okay. Really great in the middle but everything else was blah
  • (4/5)
    5 star book except for the career part. Nobody’s boss in real life loves humor and innovation and can’t stand a kiss-ass. Kind of veered into fairy tale mode when the boss talked about what a valued employee she was. No boss actually cares about employees that way and if they do, they’d NEVER say it. Half expected tinkerbell to come flittering through.
  • (1/5)
    Sincerely the worst storyline I have ever come across. A complete waste of 12 -/+ hours (audiobook). Amateur at best. Narrator was great.
  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    I'm surprised by how much I enjoyed this book.

    First, let me admit that when I downloaded it from the library, I thought it was The Coldest Girl in Coldtown. I know, I know. The covers aren't that similar, but they were similar enough to mix me up. Once I realized that it wasn't what I thought it was, I looked it up, and upon seeing that the author writes for Cosmopolitan, I was a bit dubious. Very judgmental, I know. But my point is that I went into it not expecting to like the book, and by the end, I had completely changed my opinion.

    So, this book does not start off well. The first chapter is a mess, and the main character, Ani, is difficult to like. I read many descriptions of her as an anti-hero, and I suppose that's true. Still, I was impressed by her aggressiveness, her willingness to be a complete bitch in order to get what she wants. I guess it doesn't say good things about me, but yeah, I was impressed. I have a tendency to be a pushover, and Ani clearly isn't. I liked that about her.

    Once I was into the book, I was totally into it. I think I read it in two days, and both of those nights, I stayed up way too late reading. I totally did not see the twists coming. I assumed Ani was going to be sexually assaulted, because that was the direction things seemed to be heading in. Honestly, though, so much of the book talked about her guilt and the thing she did... my guess was that she killed her rapist or something.

    I was blown away by the school shooting. Didn't see it coming at all. I tend to pigeonhole books, I think, and I guess in my mind, I thought, "this is a book about rape." So obviously that's the big plot, and that's the focus of the book. I didn't expect a whole 'nother huge conflict. I feel odd about that, because I feel like, I don't know, does there come a point where you've just got too many conflicts going on? At the same time, though, it didn't seem to hurt the story. In fact, I thought that the shooting part was exceptionally well-written.

    I also believe that Knoll did a great job of portraying Ani's emotions after the shooting. The way she freaked out upon being touched, was jumpy when hearing loud noises... and the fact that all of these things were still an issue even once Ani was grown really stood out to me. One of my favorite scenes was the one when Ani and Andrew hid under the desk in the classroom at Bradley. Her sort-of flashback to hiding behind a table during the shooting was so well-written and natural, and again, something I didn't see coming.

    Some things I didn't like/wondered about:

    1. When she went by TifAni FaNelli, does the weird capitalization change the pronunciation? Is she just called Tiffany? Or are we supposed to read it as "Tiff-AHNI"? I ask because in my opinion, capitalization should mean something and have purpose. Also, when Ani talked to Dean and told him to call her Ani, he said "Like the end..." which I assume meant "the end of TifAni." Maybe I'm just dumb.

    2. In keeping with the "maybe I'm just dumb" theme... I actually had to look up who "the five" were when I finished the book. In retrospect, I should've picked up on it, but I don't think the author really made that clear.

    3. The ending... oh, the ending. I keep up with where I am, percentage-wise, as I read. The e-book version that I had included reading guides and a bunch of other supplemental stuff at the end. So when the book ended for me at 94%, it completely caught me off guard. It felt like the author had to rush to finish, and just threw the ending together. I want to know exactly what happened at the wedding. As Nell said, it was going to be a "shit show" - but we got to see none of it.

    4. So many characters that didn't matter. So many names to keep up with, then realize that you don't have to keep up with them at all.

    Overall, I really enjoyed this book. There are some major, important themes here, and I think Knoll handled them well.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (2/5)
    I hated the lead character. She was mean, selfish and possibly caused a massacre at her school. I was hoping she would get her due - but didn't. Very disappointed.
  • (3/5)
    I'm somewhere in the middle on this book as far as rating. I read it fairly voraciously, but I'm not sure that I really liked the story. I think I would give this an average of 3.5 stars. I found parts of the story fascinating, and other parts disdainful-at least to me personally.I guess I would say you might take a chance on it. It has a flow that pulls you along, I'm just not sure that I completely enjoyed the ride. My real problem was the unlikable main character, Ani(TifAni). Ani is the type of person that I would not like in real life. She puts on a good act, but underneath is shallow and self-seeking. This held me back in completely enjoying this book. Quite honestly, she is a b**ch. She is engaged to a successful and attractive young man whose family is old money. This seems to have been her goal along with a successful journalism career of her own. One might peg her one of the "luckiest girls alive". Yet her family and some traumatic events in her past have made her far from normal. She questions her commitment to her fiance and her feelings about him. Throughout the book the back story of her youth and its very disturbing events unfolds. This was the better part of the read for me, and what I found fascinating. Eventually the past gets confronted in the present and brings a resolution to the story and Ani's direction in life.
  • (3/5)
    Meh. This book didn't do a whole lot for me. I hated the main character, but I wanted to know what the "plot twist" was going to be. Even then, I am not sure Knoll did a great job with it. It didn't explain why Ani was the way she was. I though maybe the reader would have a better understanding of Ani -- but not so much. All the name brand dropping was horrible -- it honestly started to really piss me off. I felt like anyone reading this book who didn't know those brands was looked down upon. Not every one reading this book cares about that kind of thing. I also felt that there was a great deal of "fat shaming" and "pro-ana". Ani spent most of her time starving herself and talking about crazy diets so she could fit into a size 0. Urgh. This was nothing like Gone Girl. The "plot twist" didn't even compare.