Trova il tuo prossimo audiolibro preferito

Abbonati oggi e ascolta gratis per 30 giorni
Once In A Great City: A Detroit Story

Once In A Great City: A Detroit Story

Scritto da David Maraniss

Narrato da David Maraniss


Once In A Great City: A Detroit Story

Scritto da David Maraniss

Narrato da David Maraniss

valutazioni:
4/5 (5 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
13 ore
Pubblicato:
Sep 15, 2015
ISBN:
9781442387928
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Descrizione

As David Maraniss captures it with power and affection, Detroit summed up America's path to music and prosperity that was already past history.

It's 1963 and Detroit is on top of the world. The city's leaders are among the most visionary in America: Grandson of the first Ford; Henry Ford II; influential labor leader Walter Reuther; Motown's founder Berry Gordy; the Reverend C.L. Franklin and his daughter, the amazing Aretha; Governor George Romney, Mormon and Civil Rights advocate; super car salesman Lee Iacocca; Mayor Jerome Cavanagh, a Kennedy acolyte; Police Commissioner George Edwards; Martin Luther King. It was the American auto makers' best year; the revolution in music and politics was underway. Reuther's UAW had helped lift the middle class.

The time was full of promise. The auto industry was selling more cars than ever before and inventing the Mustang. Motown was capturing the world with its amazing artists. The progressive labor movement was rooted in Detroit with the UAW. Martin Luther King delivered his "I Have a Dream" speech there two months before he made it famous in the Washington march.

Once in a Great City shows that the shadows of collapse were evident even then. Before the devastating riot, before the decades of civic corruption and neglect, and white flight; before people trotted out the grab bag of rust belt infirmities and competition from abroad to explain Detroit's collapse. From high labor costs to harsh weather, one could see the signs of a city's ruin. Detroit at its peak was threatened by its own design. It was being abandoned by the new world. Yet so much of what Detroit gave America lasts.
Pubblicato:
Sep 15, 2015
ISBN:
9781442387928
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Informazioni sull'autore

David Maraniss is an associate editor at The Washington Post and a distinguished visiting professor at Vanderbilt University. He has won two Pulitzer Prizes for journalism and was a finalist three other times. Among his bestselling books are biographies of Bill Clinton, Barack Obama, Roberto Clemente, and Vince Lombardi, and a trilogy about the 1960s—Rome 1960; Once in a Great City (winner of the RFK Book Prize); and They Marched into Sunlight (winner of the J. Anthony Lucas Prize and Pulitzer Finalist in History). A Good American Family is his twelfth book.


Correlato a Once In A Great City

Audiolibri correlati
Articoli correlati

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Once In A Great City

4.2
5 valutazioni / 5 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    An examination of Detroit during a narrow period of time with an expected liberal bias about race, government and business. Interesting narrative about Detroit' attempt at obtaining the 1968 Olympic games and the cities contribution to the music world. Epilogue showed author's blind spot toward the corruption/ incompetence of the Coleman Young and Kwame Kilpatrick administrations that contributed as greatly to Detroit's physical and spiritual deterioration as did the globalization of the auto industry and the flight to the suburbs.
  • (4/5)
    Once in a Great City A Setroit Story, by David Maraniss (read 14 Aug 2016) This is the 4th book I have read authored by David Maraniss. He is a acile and readable writer, and the theme of this book is not an obvious one. It covers a little less than two years in Detroit's history--from 1962 to 1964. Maraniss was born in Detroit though he lft there when he was six. But he tells an evocative and attention-holding story of momentous times in Detroit's history--of a time when Detroit still had a population of over a million people (its population now is under 700,000. If I had more interest in music I would have appreciated the book more but its account of George Romney, Walter Reuther, LBJ, and other political figures of the day is of great interest. A very good book.
  • (3/5)
    ONCE IN A GREAT CITY is a history book, and it reads like a history book. In other words, it contains lots and lots of information, but it's not a page turner. I want to read page turners, so perhaps this review is not fair to David Maraniss, considering all the extensive research he did for this.But I saw this book on at least one best-of-the-month list and read that it told how, even with all the greatness of people and events in Detroit during the early 1960s, there were signs that the city was going to fall apart. This is not how I understand the book. Granted, there are examples throughout of the city's greatness in the early 1960s, mainly the rise of Motown music, cars (particularly the Mustang), civil rights, and unionization. But so much of that ends up being political. And the political discussions are, as political discussions always are, the way some people, not all of them, saw what took place. A reader should be suspicious of an author's objectivity when he writes about politics or, at least, the objectivity of his sources.The only discussion I see of signs of the city's downfall is a Wayne State University prediction. Yes, when Detroiters, both black and white, had the means to do so, they moved to the suburbs. But why? Something Maraniss presents as great wasn't. That's what should be discussed. What was wrong and could have been prevented?
  • (5/5)
    Was very interesting, Brought back a lot of good memories!
  • (5/5)
    A wonderful book. The author is a native of the city, and he talks about all of the things that matter: motown,the car industry, and politics. He does not blame anyone for the decline, but simply attributes it to companies moving out andthe job loss.