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Dumplin'

Dumplin'

Scritto da Julie Murphy

Narrato da Eileen Stevens


Dumplin'

Scritto da Julie Murphy

Narrato da Eileen Stevens

valutazioni:
4/5 (229 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
9 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Sep 15, 2015
ISBN:
9780062421425
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

This beloved novel, a #1 New York Times bestseller, will soon be a major motion picture starring Danielle Macdonald and Jennifer Aniston.

For fans of John Green and Rainbow Rowell comes this powerful novel with the most fearless heroine—self-proclaimed fat girl Willowdean Dickson—from Julie Murphy, the acclaimed author of Side Effects May Vary.

With starry Texas nights, red candy suckers, Dolly Parton songs, and a wildly unforgettable heroine—Dumplin' is guaranteed to steal your heart.

Dubbed "Dumplin'" by her former beauty queen mom, Willowdean has always been at home in her own skin. Her thoughts on having the ultimate bikini body? Put a bikini on your body. With her all-American-beauty best friend, Ellen, by her side, things have always worked . . .  until Will takes a job at Harpy's, the local fast-food joint. There she meets Private School Bo, a hot former jock. Will isn't surprised to find herself attracted to Bo. But she is surprised when he seems to like her back.  

Instead of finding new heights of self-assurance in her relationship with Bo, Will starts to doubt herself. So she sets out to take back her confidence by doing the most horrifying thing she can imagine: entering the Miss Teen Blue Bonnet Pageant—along with several other unlikely candidates—to show the world that she deserves to be up there as much as any twiggy girl does.

Along the way, she'll shock the hell out of Clover City-and maybe herself most of all.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Sep 15, 2015
ISBN:
9780062421425
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Informazioni sull'autore

Julie Murphy lives in North Texas with her husband who loves her, her dog who adores her, and her cats who tolerate her. After several wonderful years in the library world, Julie now writes full-time. When she’s not writing or reliving her reference desk glory days, she can be found watching made-for-TV movies, hunting for the perfect slice of cheese pizza, and planning her next great travel adventure. She is also the author of the young adult novels Dumplin’ (now a film on Netflix), Puddin’, Ramona Blue, and Side Effects May Vary. You can visit Julie at www.juliemurphywrites.com.

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4.2
229 valutazioni / 59 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    I don't read much YA literature but made an exception with this one because I want to watch the Netflix movie made from the book. I was very pleasantly surprised with the book -- it was told from a YA perspective but was a story for any age -- be proud of who you are and live your life to the fullest.Willowdean is in high school and her Mom has given her the nickname of Dumplin'. Willowdean knows that she's fat and she is bullied over it but she is happy with who she is and with her life. She has a best friend, a part time job at Harpy's and does well in school. The major negatives in her life are her mom - a former beauty queen who is ashamed of her and the recent loss of an aunt who meant the world to her and who taught her to love Dolly Parton. When a potential boyfriend enters her life, she seems to lose her self confidence and starts questioning herself so she decides that she can gain back her self confidence by competing in a local beauty pageant that her mom is in charge of. Will she be able to gain back her self confidence or will the beauty contest make her hate herself even more? This simple little book was a definite coming of age story for teen girls and one that I wish I could have read in high school. More than that though, is the universal theme of finding that inner confidence and loving who you are no matter what you look like.Thanks to the publisher for a copy of this book to read and review. All opinions are my own.
  • (3/5)
    Although "Dumplin'" was a fluffy, light-hearted read it did have a good message about accepting your own body. Willowdean is overweight and, despite all the teasing at school, she is comfortable with who she is, although not overly confident. In fact I was expecting her to be a sassiest character than she was. She is not perfect and tends to judge others, especially when she is upset or angry. However, I did find I could relate to her. I also liked the other misfits in this book - Millie, Hannah and Amanda who all decide to register for the pageant with Will. I felt the romance let this book down. The connection between Will and Bo never felt real and I didn't like the way she led Mitch on. Overall, an okay book but I expected more.
  • (5/5)
    Love love LOVE this book! I had heard a lot about it but had to wait to get my hands on a copy of it. I read it in less than a day! Murphy is an excellent writer, and I wanted to crawl inside her world and live there for a week or so. Willowdean’s mom was a beauty queen in Texas, and has fit into her pageant dress every year since. Willowdean, on the other hand, is fat and doesn’t try to hide it. After her aunt, who was more like a second mother, passes away, Willowdean tries to find the confidence she used to have in herself, instead of in others.
  • (3/5)
    A sweet story about a teen trying to find empowerment and acceptance. I was a little annoyed that the moment she starts to like a boy, the formerly confident Willowdean starts to have body issues. Other than that, I enjoyed this book.
  • (5/5)
    EXCELLENT! So good I read it in one day!
  • (5/5)
    Dumplin' by Julie Murphy is a book and movie I kept hearing about. I am not one to follow the book trends, I like to read books off the beaten path because I find a lot of hidden gems that way but this book intrigued me. The story is about a beauty pageant but the overall theme, ironically, is not to judge others, and to be yourself, love yourself, just the way you are!The characters are great and the plot was predictable but good. I watched the movie after the book. I think the book is geared more for teens since it is more simplified in every aspect. For a grandmother like me and having gone through many of the teen trials and the mother's trials, which the movie seemed to show both of these equally important, I could relate to the movie more. I was laughing one minute then my eyes were leaking the next! ( Darn leaky eyes!)oI usually don't read books that cause leaky eyes but this was good, especially for teens and that was what I was reading it for, my young teen grand daughters. I wanted to see if it was good.
  • (4/5)
    DUMPLIN’ by Judy MurphyThis book is not PC. A teenage girl is called Dumplin’ by her mother who constantly reminds her how fat she is and how pretty she would be if she just lost some weight. Dumplin’ and her friends decide to enter the beauty contest Dumplin’s mother runs and had won many years before. Hilarity runs rampant as the young women (one fat, one disabled, one perhaps autistic and one gay) prepare their talent acts and wardrobes. This could have been awful. It was not. It becomes a sensitive and empathetic tale of young women learning to love themselves and accept others. Oh, and there is also a gentle love story. This would be great book for a mother/parent book club.4 of 5 stars
  • (4/5)
    The pages on this book flew. I enjoyed reading the story and felt the voices of her characters felt fresh and authentic. I haven't seen the movie adaptation yet - I don't know if I will watch it any time soon since I had such a satisfying reading experience - I am reluctant to watch something that might change my memory quite yet!
  • (5/5)
    What can I say. I loved this. I had heard wonderful things about this book and everything I heard was true. This book is a beautiful young adult book about self-discovery, friendship, and love. I highly recommend. My first 5 star book of 2019. Enjoy.
  • (5/5)
    I picked this book up because of a recommendation from a friend, and I am very glad I did! I simply love the main character in this book - Willowdean Dickson - the overweight daughter of a woman who was a former beauty queen. Will is so much more than her weight - she is an awesome character who does not let labels define her. She works at a fast-food restaurant where she meets the guy of her dreams, enters a pageant, changing it forever and makes true friends along the way. The author tackles a number of social issues along the way making this a book for all. As a testament to my enjoyment of this book, I am now reading Puddin' by the same author. Keep writing Julie Murphy - you are as awesome as your characters!
  • (4/5)
    Ah, that was sweet! I wanted to watch Dumplin' on Netflix but I've already given up on two free trials, so I was delighted to find the original novel. I love reading about the South in fiction - although South Texas might be a bit of stretch, like the land that time forgot - and have long had a bit of crush on Dolly, so this was bound to be a winner. And Dumplin', the nickname give to Tracy Turnblad-esque teen heroine Willowdean Dickson, is an inspiring character. I love her. I love this book.The only fault I could find is with Bo, the perfect boyfriend who shuns all the glamorous girls for Dumplin'. Not because the two of them couldn't or shouldn't happen, but because that's what happens in all the YA books with atypical heroines. I preferred shy jock Mitch, but that's just me, I suppose. And also the ending was very abrupt. But otherwise, Dumplin' is a wonderful fairy tale. Yes, there are the usual messages about accepting with who you are and being beautiful on the inside, but the lines that could have sounded like cliches only had the ring of truth for me. I will never understand why any woman this side of 1960 would want to enter a beauty pageant, but Dumplin's decision to challenge small town prejudices and her mother's embarrassment is deliciously satisfying.
  • (4/5)
    Really enjoyed this YA novel. Can’t wait to see the movie. I have already downloaded Puddin’ so I can read it soon.
  • (3/5)
    First things first: Go I'm ahead and put on the Pentatonics version of "Jolene". No, it's not a dumb cover; Dolly is actually singing along with them.Alright, now we can continue.I have had Dumplin' on my To-Be-Read shelf since it came out. I ended up meeting Julie, the other night, and it immediately jumped to her top of the list because she's just so darn cool.The basic synopsis for the book goes something like this:Willowdean (or "Dumplin'" according to her former literal beauty queen mama), owns her title as "the fat girl" at her small town high school. She's always been self-assured about this and carries on confidently until an otherwise relationship with a co-worker begins to sow seeds of doubt in her head.As a way to attempt to put her confidence back on track, she and a few friends decide to enter their town's beauty pageant, turning heads and upending paradigms at every turn.Nothing too deep or earth shattering from the outside.I thought I knew what it was about.Small town Texas.Reclaiming the word "fat"High school drama.Beauty Pageants.And sure, all of those things play a part but it is so much more than that.We tend to think everyone else is so confident and comfortable in their own skin but the reality, we have NO idea what's going on inside someone else's head.Even though Will outwardly smiles and snarks at teasing from her peers, even though she has close friends, even though she has multiple boys trying to get attention, life is far from perfect.As you can imagine, being a heavy daughter of a pageant winner, in a town obsessed with beauty competitions, is a lot of emotional labor.She describes the town's obsession as some creeping vine of a cultural phenomenon, strangling out all other options of focus."Sometimes I think the pageant is like Christmas, and we just keep trying to celebrate it earlier and earlier until it turns into a year-round event."Even (or especially) at home, she gets no relief. Her mom is a fan of "thing transformation" stories (think Biggest Loser and Extreme Makeover) which has always driven a wedge between the two women. One of the hardest lines to read in the whole book came up after her mom's discussions about Will going to the gym."Have you ever walked into a building that is dedicated to being everything you're not?"That line, I think is so important in terms of building empathy for myriad bodies. And it's something people who are comfortable in their bodies don't think of, often.Her saving grace had been her mother's sister, Lucy. Until Lucy passed, she had been closer to Will's body type than her mother's, shared Willowdean's love of Dolly Parton, and showed "Dumplin'" nothing but fierce, loyal, unconditional love. Without her, the tension between mother and daughter rises and Willowdean is completely adrift.At some points, I got frustrated because Will is incredibly hard on herself. As the reader, through her eyes, you can see two things: 1. that she is pretty dang cool and 2. She can't see it at all.She has a habit of pushing people (her best friend, her partners, and her mother) away from her in vicious self-hatred.I realized that the reason I was getting so frustrated with her was largely due to the fact that I could see myself in those feelings. Self-hatred feels so real inside our heads but seems so irrational when we see it on others.I could probably go through way more analysis but it's better to probably just read the book. Though I got a little bored in the middle, it eventually turned into one of the sweetest, most impactful books I've read in a while.
  • (3/5)
    Dumplin' is a cute story about Willowdean who is a fat girl with a former pageant queen mom. They just lost Will's aunt Luce who was a die hard Dolly Parton fan and let life pass her by because of her weight. Willowdean starts hooking up with her co-worker Bo and begins to feel self conscious when he touches her and ends the relationship. Her weight is more on her mind, her mom thinks Will can't be happy while she is at her current weight. To prove her wrong Willow joins the pageant her mom won as a teen, her life begins to spin out of control and she is doubting whether she was right before about her weight not standing in her way.

    It's a good moral story, everyone has their doubts and self esteem issues. Will is kind of mean towards other people because she doesn't realize this, but really she's just reflecting her own issues on to people. We are constantly told that Will didn't have these problems until she started hooking up with her co-worker, but the story lacked some character development in the beginning. I felt the writing could of been better, but the story is cute and can be related to by everyone.
  • (5/5)
    What a great story; a young woman fighting to overcome a small town's prejudice while inspiring a group of other "out-casts" via a small town pageant & friendship.Willowdean's mother, former Blue Bonnet pageant queen (current pageant chairwoman) still calls Wiilowdean "Dumplin'" and makes no bones about Dumplin's weight.Willowdean's best friend, Ellen, is the total opposite of Willowdean, but they compliment each other perfectly.Willowdean is working out issues of friendship, loyalty, love, & overcoming body issues all at one time.Willowdean, much to her mother's dismay, has entered the Miss Blue Bonnet Pageant along with Ellen & three other friends. Millie is heavier than Willowdean; Hannah, a Dominican lesbian has a bad overbite: and Amanda w/ a short leg & a limp... Together & on their own they prove they have what it takes to the town.The one thing I did not like/understand, was when the school jackass bully called Willowdean a name, she confronted him & kneed him in the groin. Willowdean got suspended for standing-up to him, but the punk got off scott-free.Anyway, there's more to the book and I liked it. I will be reading the newest book by this author: "Puddin'"
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed this audio version a lot. The narrator was excellent and the story was a cute and empowering look at breaking social stigmas. You go Dumplin! 3.5-4 ⭐️
  • (5/5)
    I loved this novel. It was cute and funny and heart-warming. Willowdean is so spunky and charismatic and flawed...these things make her the perfect heroine. I have never been considered fat but I have friends that have struggled with their weight for a long time and have never felt good enough. I wish they could have read this book in their teens because it would really have cheered them up and made them feel a lot more confident about their body and identity. This novel focuses on body image but it also explores issues like inclusivity (in schools and by society at large) and stereotypes about different kinds of people. I like that deep topics are expressed in a light and humorous tone that still conveys the seriousness of the issues. All in all, this was a great novel and I would recommend this to teenagers everywhere!
  • (4/5)
    Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy is a YA about a plus-size teen, Willowdean, who realizes that she is more insecure about her body image that she thought she was. She has always felt fairly comfortable in her own skin and often publicly announces herself as the “fat girl” but when the boy that she has a crush on, kisses her she has a hard time believing that he really wants to be with her. Her self-doubt almost causes her to turn her back on romance but over the course of the book she confronts these challenges to her self esteem and emerges with a new self awareness.Body image is something that most females struggle with and this book, aimed at the vulnerable teen market, passes on the message that it’s okay to not be a size two. Willowdean has accepted her weight, but now she needs to see herself as a worthwhile person who deserves happiness. All too often the “fat girl” is regulated to the back burner, she is the best friend, never the heroine of the story, but in Dumplin’ all this changes.Although the plot was a little too youth orientated for my own taste, this is a thought-provoking story with an excellent role model for self-empowerment. I did love that the main character didn’t have to lose weight in order to find her happy ending. The message is clear and positive about not letting your appearance define who you are and what you do.
  • (4/5)
    Willowdean has always exhibited a fairly high level of self esteem, despite being overweight. She's confident in her body and is more or less a happy teen. Until Bo, her very good-looking co-worker, starts taking an interest in her and some definite chemistry begins to develop. Then all of a sudden she becomes self-conscious. Her self esteem begins to drop, and in order to try to gain it back, she decides to enter the local beauty pageant, not really to try to win, but just to prove to herself that she can do it. But along the way, she seems bent on destroying not only her relationship with her best friend, but with her new boyfriend as well.It's sort of a given that this is one of those teen feel-good stories. And it is. It's somewhat predictable, but enjoyable nonetheless. Willowdean is a fun character, and it's hard not to like and root for her. I was in no way blown away by this book, but it was a fun, quick read. It seems destined to be made into a movie (which is expected out next year), and a companion novel is also in the works, which I'll most likely make sure to put on my to-read list as well.
  • (4/5)
    Fun romance.
  • (3/5)
    Dumplin'by Julie MurphyAudio narrated by Eileen Stevens3-1/2*YA novel surrounding Willowdean Dickson, a young woman who has struggled with her weight her whole life. Part of it seems to be hereditary, as she has recently lost an aunt due to morbid obesity, and her mother also struggled when she was younger. Despite her mother's concerns for Willowdean's health and happiness, which unfortunately morphs into judgment and criticism, and a lifelong stream of funny looks, comments, presumptions and bullying from many people around her, Willowdean is actually self confident and unconcerned about what others think of her. She just lives her life.Her confidence, however, starts to wane when the preparations for a beauty pageant, which is a very big deal in her little Texas town, starts to ramp up. Will's mother, a former beauty queen herself, is in charge of this pageant. Without meaning to hurt her own daughter, she encourages Willowdean's best friend, Ellen, to participate in the pageant, but never mentions the same to her. This, despite--and subsequently because of--the newfound attentions from a handsome and popular boy she works with, Bo, and also the attention of star football player, Mitch, makes Will start to doubt herself and her worth. Although she is flattered by these nice boys and is caught a bit in a love triangle, her body image rears its head and makes her afraid to take things further. She realizes that she is going to end up like her deceased aunt (by giving up opportunities) if she doesn't find her own happiness now.Although Willowdean realizes her life would be much easier if she could just conform with society's views of beauty by losing weight and by doing so make others more comfortable, instead, she decides to shake things up a bit by entering the beauty pageant just the way she is, trying to make others see that they need to get used to the idea that there are all kinds of people in the world and that they are the ones who need to change and learn to accept it. By doing so, she inspires a group of other girls who are considered outsiders to do the same, and they start to find their own confidence to be themselves as well.Although this didn't necessarily have a Will Grayson, Will Grayson ending, it was full of life lessons and lessons in friendship and left readers on a hopeful note. I think younger readers would really like this, especially teens who aren't considered "golden children" who have an easy life dished out to them on a platter.
  • (4/5)
    I loved willowdean's strong voice, it was funny to listen to in the car. It kept reminding me of Eleanor and Park int terms of the authenticity and integrity of its characters. However, the boyfriend voices were cringeworthy. The southern vocal frye made my skin crawl, but other than that, I enjoyed the characters!
  • (5/5)
    THAT WAS SO DAMN EXCELLENT!
  • (4/5)
    Willowdean Dixon likes Dolly Parton and considers herself a "fat girl". She doesn't use the adjective in a negative way like most people, but that's normally how she introduces herself to people: "Hi, I'm Willowdean: resident Fat Girl." But she wants to shine. Not only shine, but feel good about herself and not always feel like a pariah because of her size. When a whirlwind romance shakes her whole world up, Willowdean feel lost. But in a fit of clarity she tries to achieve the unthinkable: win the Clover City Teen Pageant. With some inspiration from her now-gone Aunt and Dolly, Will tries to get over not only her own insecurities, but also embrace and love the ones around her despite their own flaws.I loved this book. Maybe I'm a bit biased because I was a fat girl growing up, but it's tough to embrace yourself for who you are. I was hoping that Will would have become friends with Mitch -- especially because he is a sweet soul -- but she needed to become her own person and correct the mistakes she made, even though it might have hurt some people in the process. I also liked the friendship that her and Ellen had throughout the story. These girls had their own self-image issues (even seemingly perfect girls like Ellen), and they learned that it is okay to drift apart a little, because that's all part about growing up.Thrilled this book was a Illinois' Read for a Lifetime book; will be recommending this to my students!
  • (4/5)
    Loved the book, but I need a few more chapters at the end! ugh
  • (5/5)
    This book was a fantastic read. Though there are little things that bothered me like the pace of the book, I still loved it! Definitely worth the money and the while! Willowdean is definitely one to root for, even though she can be a little rude at times! And I hope the movie can do at least half as great as the book!
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this!! The narration was amazing and the story was as well, although I wish the pageant wasn’t so rushed.
  • (4/5)
    Achei o livro um bom YA, com uma escrita boa também, apesar da personagem principal me irritar ás vezes pela insegurança dela. Mas ao finalizar a leitura percebi que esse aspecto é uma parte legal do livro também, afinal quem não é inseguro com o seu corpo e precisa aprender a trabalhar isso? Essa é mensagem do livro e é muito importante, para pessoas de todas as idades e o a minha parte preferida nele.
  • (4/5)
    I liked it. There times it was hard to like WillowDean but most of us are probably hard to like at that age, so I'll forgive her. the story had more depth than I anticipated, and the ending made me happy, even if I didn't fully agree with her choices. All in all a good read.
  • (5/5)
    Pure joy, I loved it every bit as much as the first time I read it. The red suckers, the Dolly Parton appreciation, the friendships, Mitch being a truly good guy even if he isn’t the right guy, the mother-daughter moments that so rarely go the way either intended, the small victories, just every bit of this, the dialogue, the emotions, the setting, all of it feels so real, so true, it’s almost like if you listened really closely, you could hear the characters’ heartbeats on every single page.