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Hero And The Crown

Hero And The Crown

Scritto da Robin McKinley

Narrato da Roslyn Alexander


Hero And The Crown

Scritto da Robin McKinley

Narrato da Roslyn Alexander

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (83 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
10 ore
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1992
ISBN:
9781470356408
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

Although she is the daughter of Damar's king, aerin has never been accepted as full royalty. Both in and out of the royal court, people whisper the story of her mother, the witchwoman, who was said to have enspelled the king into marrying her to get an heir to rule Damar - then died of despair when she found she had borne a daughter instead of a son. But none of them, not even aerin herself, can predict her future - for she is to be the true hero who will wield the power of the Blue Sword.

Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1992
ISBN:
9781470356408
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Robin McKinley's other books include the Newbery Award-winning The Hero and the Crown; Newbery Honor Book The Blue Sword; Sunshine; Spindle's End; Rose Daughter; Deerskin; The Outlaws of Sherwood; and the short story collections The Door in the Hedge; A Knot in the Grain and Other Stories; and, with her husband, the author Peter Dickinson, Water: Tales of Elemental Spirits. She lives in England with her husband, three whippets, and over five hundred rosebushes.

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4.3
83 valutazioni / 103 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    Technically speaking, The Hero and the Crown is the second book published in the Damar series though events are sent many years prior to The Blue Sword. The hero of legend, Aerin Firehair, wasn't always a hero. Once she was the shy, awkward only child of the King of Damar. This is her story about her coming of age and how her legend was made.The story is a classic hero's quest though it has some unusual elements in the second half. I absolutely loved Aerin's character, how real she feels and how hard she works to earn her place. Arein is an unsatisfactory princess - she isn't beautiful, her mother was a "witch" and she yearns to become a dragon slayer, which in this world an unglamorous job since dragons are seen as vermin and their slaying as no more than a chore. The more effort she goes to in order to prove herself to her father's court, the more she's underappreciated, never mind that all her accomplishments are quite valued by the common people she helps. She even uses methodical persistence to work out a scientific problem, with much success and was pretty cool because it's not something you see often in this kind of story. Seeing as this is a hero journey, Aerin continues her struggles until she's ultimately successful, proving herself beyond all doubt by saving the day in the end.And now for the unusual stuff. Spoilers ahead. There is a fight that requires Aerin to travel back and forth in time. It was very confusing to read. I'm really glad one of the other characters explains it afterwards because it felt more like a dream sequence than an actual battle. Also interesting is how the author made depression a plot point. Discussing mental illness was virtually unheard of in any of the 80's fiction I read, especially not in a YA adventure story. It's handled quite well, both caused and cured by magic, yet shows the hero's resilience as she doggedly continues on her quest regardless. Highly unusual is that our hero ends up with two love interests, has relationships with both and yet this isn't a love triangle. Aerin understands that after she's become immortal, she can marry and live with her mortal lover and then join her immortal one later. Yet there is never any romantic angst. She makes her decisions level headed and when she feels like she's ready.This story resonated with me due to all the hardships Aerin endures and over comes. I can see myself rereading this one in the future. I also greatly enjoy McKinley's prose. I need to check out some of her adult books in the future.
  • (3/5)
    Truly a YA tale. I read it too old as I find it a nit too childish for my taste. Still OK though. The way it's written is weird though.
  • (5/5)
    I jumped into this book immediately after finishing The Blue Sword. It takes place prior to The Blue Sword, but I think I got more from it reading The Blue Sword first. Aerin is the daughter of the king, but her mother was accounted a witch woman who may have magicked her way into the king's heart. Aerin's precarious position in her society (due to this hinted at stigma) led her to find a niche that was appropriate. Her bravery and sense of duty sang in my heart. Her battles with the evils in the land were epic. The interludes with Luthe were rich and peaceful. And I loved how the Damar we saw in The Blue Sword had its roots in what Aerin did.This book is well worth reading if you enjoy fantasy at all.
  • (4/5)
    While still enjoyable, the years since I had last read it, have diminished it from my memory. Even though I enjoy Aerin as a semi-feisty heroine, the plot falls plight to one of the worst fantasy tropes: the savior knowing exactly what to do without knowing why (in this case Aerin's surka wreath).I still really like it, if only for the descriptions of Talat's "grimaces of pleasure" as he's being groomed, and yes he's a horse.
  • (5/5)
    The Land of Damar before Angharad eventually makes her life. An historical preview of 'what went before' and the origin of the Blue Sword.
  • (4/5)
    Robin McKinley is one of those Fantasy authors who I've never heard anything negative about her writing. When I found out that she wrote several fairy tale retellings, I began trying to find all of them. While this isn't a retelling, it's still Fantasy, so I bought it along with the second book, The Blue Sword.

    I would have finished The Hero and the Crown in a single day if I had started it earlier. I tried to finish it before I went to bed, but by 4 am, I couldn't keep my eyes focused on the page anymore. So, I finished it the next day. The only part of the story I didn't care for was the romance. I know the two characters involved had spent a lot of time together by the time they fell in love, but it didn't feel that way. Perhaps that's because I read the book so quickly, or maybe it's because that part of the story didn't take up a lot of pages. Regardless, I would have preferred them to just be close friends. That's how I feel about a lot of fictional relationships, though, especially if the romance isn't necessary to the plot. Why is it that every time there happens to be both a male and female character in a book they have to fall in love with each other?

    Putting the romance issue aside, I absolutely loved this book. There is a significant part involving the main character, Aerin, and her relationship with her horse that I thought would bore me because I've never had any real interest in horse stories. Surprisingly, that was one of the most engrossing parts of the story. In other words, Robin McKinley succeeded in making me care about a horse, when up to this point in my life, the only horses I've liked are My Little Ponies. So, if you happen to love horses, Robin McKinley, quest narratives, or High Fantasy, take a lazy day during the weekend (but start earlyish) to read The Hero and the Crown.
  • (5/5)
    Although I never got into the prequel ([book: The Blue Sword]), this fantasy is absolutely excellent. At times this novel is very surreal, but overall the story is written in a serious tone, as if these events could and did actually happen. A great young adult book for girls who like fantasy. I really can't see boys getting into it. They may take offense that an ugly, awkward girl is a dragonslayer and not a burly knight. I really really enjoy it, and it is another book which I regularly reread.
  • (3/5)
    Aerin is the daughter of the King's second wife who was believed to be a witch. Many people fear her and treat her with disdain. Aerin slowly comes out of her shell and becomes a warrior who saves her people.

  • (3/5)
    This is one book of many books in the universe that sets itself to prove that girls can be as good as boys, that they can become warriors like boys and that no girl should think otherwise of themselves. The story is somewhat of a fairy tale, mostly a fantasy, and focuses on Aerin as she grows up to become something great because of her own determination. What I liked about her development was that there was no hiding of the fact that she was flawed, her story changed as she changed, her love interests changed as were required, which is somewhat unusual of stories of this kind where the princess always falls for the man she was meant to or the two best friends live happily ever after once they realize they are in love. There are so many good elements in this book that I wish I could give it the highest marks possible and swoon over the fact that it won the Newbery Medal.Sadly though, the writing style just didn't go with me. It took me forever to force myself to trudge through the first few chapters and then I had to challenge myself to continue on. Somewhere along the way I admit that I warmed to the story a little and so I followed the action from cover to cover without too much struggle in the end, but that wanting to read was more out of a general curiosity of a technical standpoint, wondering what would happen next and where the author was going to take the plot, than it was that I was actually excited about the events taking place.I feel like this is a very well written story. I want to agree with everyone who says they loved this book. I want to congratulate the author on winning the Medal, because I think it really must have all of that somewhere inside it. I wish that all of those things could happen for me, but I don't feel that I can force my experience into that of the others who have reviewed this book. Maybe I didn't read this at the right time in my life or maybe I wasn't in the right mood for this adventure when I started it, only a reread will tell, and though I can't bring myself to do that just now, I will certainly try again some day.
  • (5/5)
    This was only my second Robin McKinley book, but it won't be my last. Though it took a few chapters to get pulled into it, primarily because there are so many characters introduced so quickly, the story was impossible to walk away from once it got started. Full of atmosphere, engaging characters, and compelling turns, the story was simply wonderful. Notably, McKinley's descriptions are gorgeous, but she also proves herself a master of writing about animals believably, both as they behave naturally and as they interact with humans.Simply, the book made me feel rather as if I'd been sucked into a fairy tale all over again, and it was wonderful.Recommended.
  • (3/5)
    A very clunky book. It begins in the middle of the action. Then the events leading up to the middle are told, then the events following. The pre-story is actually kind of good; but the post-story is awful. A YA novel that couldn't be read by adults, and maybe shouldn't be read by impressionable YAs either. Dragonsong is a far superior girl-power with dragons novel, even if the dragons aren't really dragons.
  • (5/5)
    McKinley has created a richly detailed world that is utterly fantastical yet completely believable. I eagerly read through this book in one go as I could not put it down. Aerin is a wonderful character who I found myself cheering on throughout the book.
  • (5/5)
    After I finished reading this I discovered that I had read it previously 16 years ago. I read the entire book this time without the slightest inkling that I had read it before. Obviously it didn't make much of an impression on me last time--although I guess enough of an impression to make me want to keep it with me for the past 16 years.At any rate, this time it definitely did leave an impression. I loved the first half of this book. This won the Newbery Medal in 1985, but if I hadn't known better, I wouldn't have guessed that this book is targeted for younger audiences. This is the story of a king's only child, Aerin, a daughter from his second marriage. Rumor has it that his second wife was a witch who ensorceled the king into loving her so that she could bear his heir and take over his kingdom, but then died of despair when she gave birth to a daughter instead of a son. Aerin grows up in a court that never quite accepts her, knowing that her destiny lies elsewhere. This is the story of how she discovers exactly where her destiny lies.Aerin's character comes as alive and as real as any I've read. The author pulled me into the story and had me caring a great deal for what was going to happen to Aerin. I didn't want to put this down.But about halfway through the novel, things change a bit. All of the main battle scenes were ethereal and ambiguous and I didn't enjoy those parts. I felt like I was just slogging through those pages waiting for the story to rematerialize and get back on track. But once it did, the story picked right back up again. If it wasn't for these parts I would've given this 5 out of 5 stars.
  • (3/5)
    Great concept, not well executed. This was one of those books I really wanted to like, and did in the beginning, but found it lacking in the end.A heroine, great. Dragons, great (even if I usually prefer the dragons as wise comrades instead of brutes to be hunted). Starting with the outcast, educating her, and elevating her as we watch, to city protector, great. These story starting stones would have laid the foundation for a fantastic epic series. Instead, it's all introduced and finished in a two-hundred page book.The opening chapters weren't too bad, if a bit slow moving or confusing given the language and flashback. After that, it was as if the author laid out an outline and ran out of time or pages to flesh it out. Everything felt rushed. Things that should have been new for the character were taken in stride as unsurprising and passed over for the next new thing.Then the romantic aspect to the ending, which may have made sense in a longer series, felt sudden, forced, fake, and bizarre. Oh, by the way, that character we've been dealing with all this time, setting him up as her childhood friend, with now mutually newfound other feelings? He's not important. There's this immortal that will show up in a fever-induced dream who is your heroine's instant soul-mate. Oh and that? There's always duty to consider, so he must be set aside also, and we'll return to the original character who now must be the heroine's husband, for the sake of the city. But the consolation prize? She's no longer mortal now, so once this guy kicks the bucket, she can go back to her mysterious soul-mate. Say what?I would still like to give this author another try, since I know this is only a prequel to a well hailed book. Other than that, this story mainly serves as fodder for my own imagination, and makes me eager to try other more well-known fantasy genre epics that might deal with the knight/dragon stories in more depth, and more to my satisfaction. I would only recommend this as a light read to someone who wants to toy with the genre but has no desire to read longer works. Even then, I bet those who read a lot of fantasy could provide better recommendations. Overall, good ideas were introduced, but the book left me wanting, and thus has very little reread potential.
  • (4/5)
    this was a pretty good read, i thought. not innovative, but of its type engaging and well written.
  • (4/5)
    Good, but without the impact of, say, Deerskin, or Rose Daughter and Beauty.
  • (3/5)
    i didn't love the hero and the crown nearly as much as i loved the blue sword. this is not to say that i haven't read it three times. it is a very good use of the time invested into the reading of it and a must read for anyone who like the blue sword.
  • (4/5)
    Recommended to newbie fantasy readers seeking a story in which the hero is a young female who is not perfect nor beautiful.I enjoyed the story but, despite its nearly 300 pages, it felt too short for me. Maybe that's a good thing, maybe not. The other thing that made me like the story less was the fact that they killed the dragons.3.5 stars
  • (5/5)
    I've read this book so many times I'm pretty sure I know entire sections word for word. It's the only book I had taken with me on vacation when our house burnt down over twenty years ago, and thus is the oldest and maybe dearest book I own. I'm not going to say it's perfect, but it's so special to me (and, don't get me wrong, very good) that I can't give it anything but a five.
  • (4/5)
    Remember back in the day when it didn't take 15 1000p books to tell an awesome story? I miss those days.

    So this book is one of those fantasy classics I should have read, I was told to read, and never did get around to. And once again, I am heartily sorry I didn't, though I am pleased to have done it now.

    The main character, Aerin, is a half-noble girl child of a king, one whose mother was reportedly a witch, so the nobles (and most of the townsfolk) don't take much of a liking to her out of sheer prejudice. She's uncomfortable in her own skin and as the daughter (and only child) of the King. Of course, all of the good characters do take a liking to her and she gets to do cool stuff like tame and rehabilitate a lame horse, battle dragons, and save the land.

    Aerin is everything an awesome heroine should be, and I quite like her. She's strong and vulnerable, not overly pretty and as imperfect as anyone can be. I imagine she's a character any awkward girl would love.

    There is more characterization, plot, atmosphere, and story in this book than many others more than 6 times its length and a totally worthy, fantastic read. Some of it is predictable, and some of it is formulaic (now, I'm not sure how much of it would be in 1984), but it's still damn awesome.
  • (4/5)
    I have read this book over and over again since I was 10. Part of the personal draw for me is that my mother named me, a fiery ginger-haired girl, after the fiery ginger-haired heroine. Aerin Firehair became Erin, The Book Nut. But this book holds up no matter who you are. Bravery, curiosity, impulsiveness, stubbornness. These qualities describe Aerin, a girl who fights to belong. And fight she does. Despite a nasty couple of cousins and the prejudice of a kingdom, she overcomes. Every time I read this book I can't help but smile. Its sequel, The Blue Sword is not quite at the same level as this book, but definitely ranks close behind. Both books are certainly worth a read!
  • (3/5)
    This feels very old fashioned in style. It's 25 years old, but really takes it's inspiration from the old style of mythic fantasy. However, classic high fantasy with a strong heroine is never a bad thing. The mythic style makes it feel rather rushed however, especially towards the end, and I never felt a personal connection to Aerin.
  • (3/5)
    I kept thinking that The Hero and the Crown was finally going to descend into the predictability of rags-to-riches fantasy, and then being surprised by a new element that McKinley introduced into the story. There were far too many prophetic dreams, victorious-despite-overwhelming-odds battles, and I-saw-that-coming revelations. But McKinley makes up for it with an unusually sarcastic narrator and an extraordinarily nuanced portrayal of love.
  • (4/5)
    Classic fantasy tale, extremely well told. Aerin, with her all-too-human imperfections (and her wonderfully sarcastic wit), makes for a great narrator. The only child of a king, but removed from the line of succession because her parents' marriage was ruled morganatic, Aerin struggles to fit in with the rest of the ruling class. Her pursuit of a mysterious shield against dragonfire, though, brings her great acclaim ... and a quest against a more powerful foe than any dragon.Highly enjoyable from first to last.
  • (5/5)
    Great book, quick read.
  • (4/5)
    A well-told tale and typical Robin McKinley, who brings a uniquely modern perspective to a style that reads like genuine myth. In this case, the hero is a young woman and, as she struggles to save her kingdom, the uniqueness of her character unfolds for the reader. Splendid fun.
  • (2/5)
    Another in the shop-worn genre of girls-can-be-as-good-as-boys. Magical system was unexplained and unclear. Milieu was unexceptional, as were the characters and the plot, which was uncommonly muddy. The first section had far too many back-stitches (not = flashbacks); they were confusing and unnecessary. However, an okay read for late teens.
  • (3/5)
    Summary: Aerin's the daughter of the king of the struggling kingdom of Damar, but everyone whispers that her mother was a witch from the North who bewitched the King, making Aerin not really a real princess. She grows up largely as an outcast from the royal court, much preferring riding her otherwise untameable horse to staying trammeled in the castle listening to the hum of gossip about her. But when Aerin rediscovers an old potion recipe for making a fireproofing spell, she realizes she can at least be useful to the kingdom in which she doesn't really fit. She starts slaying dragons - a dangerous and thankless task, but one which must be done. But neither Aerin nor anyone else in the kingdom forsees the destiny that this choice has given her. Review: Well, that's it, I think I'm officially giving up on McKinley's work. I just do not get along with her writing style, and this book was no exception.Or rather, half of this book was no exception. The first half of the story - the tale of Aerin's girlhood and teen years, up to the point where she fights the Big Dragon - is really quite good. It's still not my favorite style of storytelling; it shifted through time, back and forwards through the story, in a way that I didn't always follow or feel was necessary. But overall, it was a lot more personal, a lot closer to Aerin's point of view, with realistic dialogue, some touches of humor, and a story that gave you a good feel for who Aerin was and how she got to be like that. But the second half of the book went from character focused to weirdly distant and epic in tone, even though it was still technically Aerin's POV. There's a lot of mythical questing and quasi-immortal beings and strange surreal battle scenes and magical McGuffins that are linked to the land and nature magic and that sort of silliness, and the whole thing loses the immediacy and intimacy of the first half in exchange for a lot of pretentious blather about destiny and mortal lifespans and blah. It really felt like there were halves of two totally different books only roughly joined together, and although I would have liked to have kept reading the book of the first half, the dry second half totally put me off. 2.5 out of 5 stars.Recommendation: I know a lot of people really like McKinley's work, so I am maybe not the best one to judge. But even among the books of hers that I've read, this was not one of my favorites.
  • (3/5)
    If you like McKinley's work, especially the Blue Sword, then you should go for this.
  • (5/5)
    Finally available as an ebook, The Hero and the Crown holds up amazingly well for a thirty-year-old book.Aerin, the daughter of the king of Damar and a foreign woman rumored to be a witch, is awkward and clumsy and lacking in the royal magic. Not a princess, merely the king's disregarded daughter, she has few friends; besides her maid, the only person with much time for her is her older cousin Tor, the king's heir. While recuperating from a serious illness, Aerin befriends her father's old warhorse, now out to pasture, and studies how to kill dragons. Armed with a fireproofing potion that she reconstructed from an old text, she succeeds. But dragons are merely vermin, and the name Dragonkiller does her no good at court. But there are bigger dangers for her to face, including the last of the old dragons, Maur, who may yet destroy both Aerin and Damar.Aerin is a delightful character: strong, intelligent, and stubborn, with a full measure of curiosity. She is by no means perfect, but her victories are all the more precious for that.Highly recommended.