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Thursdays with the Crown

Thursdays with the Crown

Scritto da Jessica Day George

Narrato da Susan Jackson


Thursdays with the Crown

Scritto da Jessica Day George

Narrato da Susan Jackson

valutazioni:
4/5 (30 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
5 ore
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 2014
ISBN:
9781490635712
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

Castle Glower has been acting weird, so it's no surprise when two towers transport Celie and her siblings to an unknown land. When they realize that no one from home is coming to get them, the kids-along with Celie's pet griffin Rufus-set out through the forest to figure out where they are and what's happened to their beloved Castle. Instead, they discover two wizards and an entire lost people, the oldest inhabitants of Castle Glower. And it seems they may know more of the Castle's secrets than Celie. But do they know how to get her back home? This bestselling series continues with the story of the origin of Castle Glower. Readers who've been enchanted by the Castle's moving walls will be delighted by the Castle's rich and magical history.
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 2014
ISBN:
9781490635712
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

JESSICA DAY GEORGE is the New York Times bestselling author of the Tuesdays at the Castle series, the Twelve Dancing Princesses series, and the Dragon Slippers trilogy. Originally from Idaho, she studied at Brigham Young University and worked as a librarian and bookseller before turning to writing full-time. She now lives in Salt Lake City, Utah, with her husband and their three young children. www.jessicadaygeorge.com @jessdaygeorge

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4.2
30 valutazioni / 8 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed the book and would have rated it 4 stars but I think #2 and #3 should have been a single book. That is a pet peeve of mine. If you can, read the second and third together.
  • (5/5)
    4.5 stars. I loved getting to explore the world outside Castle Glower finally and find out so much about the Castle and the origin of the griffins :D. I want my own baby griffin now D:
  • (4/5)
    Celie, Lilah, Rolf and their friends Lulath and Pogue find themselves in a different world with parts of Castle Glower. They want to find the missing piece of the eye in order to fix Castle Glower. But before they find that missing piece, they find griffins, two competing evil wizards, and conflicting stories about the history of the castle.This is the third book in the series that began with Tuesday at the Castle. Celie's older brother and sister are still determined to protect her but Celie has skills and talents of her own. After all, she was the first one to impress a griffin when Rufus hatched. Before they get home both Lulath and Lilah have new baby griffins too.This story was entertaining and filled with action. I especially liked the griffins. Celie is a great character - smart and adventurous. Middle grade fantasy lovers will enjoy this series.
  • (4/5)
    I have not read the first two books in this series. So you might ask than why would I jump right in and check out book three. It is because I had a chance to read book three and since I have been seeing this book all over I thought I would not pass up the chance to read this book and see what this series is about. I am always on the hunt for more books for my nephews to read. I think reading for children is important and I want them to enjoy reading like I do. First off, while I have not read the prior novels, I had no problems jumping right into this book and I don't think my nephews will have a problem either. This is because the author did a good job of making this story progress and not reference to the past events too much. The wording in this book is nice as well. There are not too big of words and it flows easy. So the younger readers can read this book on their own with little assistance. Celie, her friends and siblings were a fun bunch. They helped keep things entertaining. Rufus was awesome. I can just see my nephews wanting their own griffiths. Now that I have gotten a taste for this series, I will have to check out the prior novels.
  • (3/5)
    Not bad, but the series is becoming slightly annoying. This is an immediate sequel to Wednesdays - as in, it starts a few hours after the other finishes, with the characters stranded in a strange place (which is still Castle Glower). I don't think this could be read and enjoyed without reading at least Wednesdays and probably Tuesdays first. Two particularly annoying bits - one, the book is utterly full of unreliable narrators. By the end of the book, I was quite certain that this guy was lying, and that guy was lying too, and the other one was lying about at least some things... What I wasn't certain about at all was what actually happened, at any point. Including the events that happened in this book, some of them - revisionism started immediately. Bah. And two, annoyed at Celie's obtuseness about blood and the Castle - throwing the crown around like that, sheesh. The griffins are neat (yes, more than just Rufus), the situation is quite nasty. And what about the people in the town - are they still going to try to leave tribute? Did the various wizards ever do anything for them, or only demand stuff? At least the lake might become clear. Like the first book, the end seems a trifle facile. And then the setup for the next book - which I will read, I want to see what _those_ people say about the griffins (and unicorns). Lilah seems a little greedy though, she wants both a griffin and a unicorn? Maybe Rolf will get the unicorn. I did, despite the above complaints, enjoy the book reasonably well. Not a favorite, but I'm glad I read it.
  • (5/5)
    I really appreciated this book.
    Everything in it and around it
  • (4/5)
    {Third of 5: Castle Glower series. Fantasy, children's}Sailing straight on from the cliff-hanger in Wednesdays in the Tower, twelve year old Princess Celie together with her older siblings Rolf and Lilah plus a couple of other important people are caught in part of the Castle that has transported them to another world. Here they discover people and animals from the Castle's past and start to piece together the long history of the Castle. If they can trust the person telling them that history.Meanwhile, they seem to be entangled in a foreign political situation when all they want to do is get home to their family. (Side note; although I like the way the series uses consecutive days of the week I’m not sure that the title fits this time, though I can see how it was derived.) This book is a bit more serious than the preceding two in that I feel it deals a bit more with the characters rather than just the story and we start to see them in a different light. The king and queen, who were absent in the first book and were more secondary actors in the second, also start to become real people. I like the family interactions; the relationship between the four siblings has always been a strength of the series and it's easy to see the age differences between them. And it's nice to see how much their parents care about them; at the end of the adventure when they finally get home (not really a spoiler because this is not, after all, a tragedy):‘Daddy?’‘What is it, Celia-delia?’ King Glower almost tripped over Rufus trying to get to her. It also deals with emotions such as really wanting something but having to put on a brave face on when someone else gets it.Still fun and easy to read.‘Insufferable man,’ King Glower said. ‘I’m glad to hear he’s a traitor. Now I can justify my dislike of him.’ And while there's no cliff-hanger ending this time, there is a hint as to what adventure we'll be going on next.4**** (4 stars)
  • (4/5)
    Thursdays with the Crown by Jessica Day George is the third Castle Glower book. Celie, Rolf, his girl friend Lilah, and her brother Lulath are transported with the castle to its homeland. They need to figure out where they are and how to get home. Celie also wants to understand what's wrong with her beloved castle.There are three parts to this book: exploration, discovery of other people, the flight home. Celie and the others end up hearing two completely different stories about the castle and the land they've been sent to. The land itself provides yet another version.Celie and the others need to piece together the truth from all the versions in order to find their way home. If they can't, they're likely to end up either prisoners or casualties.While I normally love this type of story, I found the pacing lagging, especially at the beginning. The adventure and mystery is hindered by Lulath's dialect. Lulath and his sister are from a far away and their foreignness is emphasized through their goofy grammar and weird idioms. The problem is, Lulath actually has the most relevant experience to the situation they've now found themselves in. So we have to sit through page after page of his goofy pseudo-accent.Why does Lulath sound like Balki?A little of these fake accents go a long way, especially in a novel where all of the characters are now foreigners in a land they've never seen. Why don't any of the people they meet on their adventure have an accent? Why is it just Lulath who talks weird? And why does he have to sound so much like Balki from Perfect Strangers?I'm only taking one star off for the pacing and idiom problems because the rest of the novel is so strong. While the first two books were rather fluffy adventures about a magical castle and a baby griffon. This one takes the back story we've been given and explodes it open. It also poses a bunch of tough, uncomfortable questions. This book covers similar themes to the Fullmetal Alchemist manga series by Hiromu Arakawa. Gower is a kingdom built on a foundation of genocide — a real world, harsh reality detail, that I've never seen in a fantasy book aimed at elementary school aged readers.