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Fight Club

Fight Club

Scritto da Chuck Palahniuk

Narrato da James Colby


Fight Club

Scritto da Chuck Palahniuk

Narrato da James Colby

valutazioni:
4/5 (605 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
5 ore
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 2008
ISBN:
9781436133005
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

THE FIRST RULE about fight club is you don't talk about fight club. Every weekend, in the basements and parking lots of bars across the country, young men with whitecollar jobs and failed lives take off their shoes and shirts and fight each other barehanded just as long as they have to. Then they go back to those jobs with blackened eyes and loosened teeth and the sense that they can handle anything. Fight club is the invention of Tyler Durden, projectionist, waiter, and dark, anarchic genius, and it's only the beginning of his plans for violent revenge on an empty consumer-culture world.
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 2008
ISBN:
9781436133005
Formato:
Audiolibro


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Cosa pensano gli utenti di Fight Club

4.2
605 valutazioni / 171 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    It's awesome! It's well-written! :P And for those who have seen the movie... read it! It's full of funny hints etc, leading to the end. It's awesome!
  • (4/5)
    This is a hard one to rank. It's great for Chuck Palahniuk but good as a stand alone novel. I just want to put out there that he writes the same novel over and over again (just like sci-fi by Michael Crichton and horror by Stephen King). This is probably his best version of his one book.

    As a stand alone it's hilarious. Dark humor yes, but if you didn't know that going in you'll figure it out soon enough. Hopefully you'll also pick up on the sarcasm. The entire book is written as a wry parody of subversion, rather than being a manual to subversion itself. They all sign up and join a group with a uniform and standard haircut to make sure that they are different... Whether you read it as the army, religion or the many people who read/saw this and wanted to be just like all of those individuals, it fits.

    Fun to read. Not dumb but subtly crafted either.
  • (5/5)
    In many ways, just like the movie. Incredible and inspiring!
  • (5/5)
    You know the first two rules of fight club.
  • (5/5)
    If you've seen the movie, rest assured that the movie is a faithful adaptation of the book, even trying to capture Palahniuk's writing style. The story is told from perspective of the nameless narrator, and the world is filtered exclusively through his eyes. We know something because the narrator knows it. The book is able to give us greater insights into the narrator's psyche, but the movie excels at conveying the raw intensity of the action (as is to be expected for its medium).
  • (3/5)
    I think I may have enjoyed this book more had I not seen the movie first. I like the author's writing style, but feel at times that it becomes repetitive. Though the book is good in its own right, if I had the choice between reading the book or watching the movie, I'd go with the movie.
  • (4/5)
    I really liked it. What can I say. It's funny, out there, a really good read. There are enough reviews on this book to satisfy so only a rating this time. Straight four it is then. Recommended.
  • (5/5)
    A wreckless masterpiece.
  • (4/5)
    excellent.
  • (3/5)
    Overrated.
  • (3/5)
    Ballard is better.
  • (4/5)
    Realize the movie was a decent adaptation. Great book! Great movie!
  • (4/5)
    Finally, the trump presidency is explained. It resulted from Mayhem project homework. Congrats to Tyler Durden's space monkies, they pulled off a big one.
  • (4/5)
    I loved the film and the book was almost like a screenplay for the film. Very faithful adaptation.

    The thing I like most about this book is the social commentary about the alienation of young men. This is definitely something that taps into an angry vein underlying the modern man.

    Reading it for a second time my rating doesn't change but I did pick up more in the novel. I also noticed that I probably liked the movie adaptation more for the skilful way it pulled everything together.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this one. The style takes a little getting used to as it's often a stream of consciousness from the main protagonist. The existential crisis of the narrator combined with his insomnia is at the core of the book as the situation escalates rapidly around him, steadily moving from a means of escapism into something that is no longer really his to control.Once into it, it read very quickly and I wanted to keep going to see where the narrator and his alter-ego's machinations would take him. I would definitely look into more of the author's work.
  • (5/5)
    So I saw the movie years ago and was always a fan of it and since I found out that it was based off of a book, I had wanted to read it. Of course other novels kept creeping up and pushed this one another slot backwards, and finally with some prompting of a co-worker who's a huge Palahniuk fan, I bought it. I was not disappointed. Not only do things make more sense in the book, the story in general is told better. You really get the messy details that the move smooths over. Great movie, better book.
  • (5/5)
    Recently, one of my students let me borrow her copy of "Fight Club" and told me that I HAD to read it. So I tried. But I really couldn't get into the first few pages. I hadn't watched the movie "Fight Club" in a really long time, so I decided to go back to the movie. Watching the movie made me remember why I had loved the story so much when I first saw it. I jumped into the book and finished it within just a couple of days. This is not something I usually do, watch a movie first and then read the book. But for some reason, it was necessary for me to have Ed Norton and Brad Pitt and Helena Bonham Carter in my head to truly get into the book. Now that I'm done, I can't wait to revisit the movie again to see how it compares to all the things I just experienced in the book. I won't spoil this review with any of my theories about Tyler or Marla or Bob or the nameless narrator (called Jack in the film), but I will say that I can't wait to talk Abigail (my student) about it on Monday!
  • (5/5)
    How much would I have enjoyed this book if I had never seen the movie? Unfortunately, I'll never know.

    What I do know is that I blitzed through the second half of this book as though my huevos were on the line.
  • (3/5)
    That was... different.
  • (5/5)
    A resoundingly brilliant, searing satire of the human condition. It took a minute for me to get into this, but by the end I was stunned by Palahniuk's writing, as well as his deft observations and rendering of his characters and of what they represent. Better than the movie, which is obviously boss.
  • (3/5)
    Fight Club is a gritty, psychological thriller that has you turning each scenario around in your head, trying to figure out exactly what is going on. Having seen the movie first (as I'm sure is the case with many others), I knew going into it all major surprises and twists; however, the movie adaptation was unable to convey the narrator's voice and personal torment quite the way the novel does. The style of writing and narration was slightly different from anything I've read before, but it fit the story perfectly. It is a book that is best read without additional information beyond the synopsis, but I will say that it is much more than what the name implies. While not overly violent, the imagery created allows for a dark and semi-disturbing read.
  • (4/5)
    I don't know what I was expecting (or how I could possibly be surprised by Fight Club given how much it's referenced in popular culture today) but... I was surprised by Fight Club. It's a compelling examination of masculinity and the expectations placed on men. And there's a plot twist that shocked me entirely.
  • (3/5)
    I think I may have enjoyed this book more had I not seen the movie first. I like the author's writing style, but feel at times that it becomes repetitive. Though the book is good in its own right, if I had the choice between reading the book or watching the movie, I'd go with the movie.
  • (4/5)
    I was pleasantly surprised by this novel; as someone who hated the Brad Pitt/Edward Norton movie, I didn't expect to enjoy it. But enjoy it I did! It's well paced, and what doesn't come off well onscreen is executed quite nicely in the text. I don't agree with the idea that men aren't "men" anymore because of civilization/commercial values, but it's presented in an interesting way, and definitely worth thinking about.
  • (5/5)
    This is one of those rare occasions (at least for me) when I've seen the movie before reading the book. I would say that once you know, or understand, the main plot, it doesn't make much sense going through it again. Well, I am wrong this time. There is still a lot of knowledge to mine throughout the book, even if you're familiar with the story. The existential fear that permeates every phrase uttered, every word spoken. The meaninglessness of our routines, daily troubles. It all comes through. It's a splendid book. Dynamic, pushy, and it keeps you on your toes wanting for more. I am Joe's exuberant kidney.
  • (5/5)
    Excellent read with a unique quirkiness that keeps one turn9ng the pages.
  • (4/5)
    Very trippy book, short but well written. Engaging from start to finish
  • (4/5)
    Its superb
  • (5/5)
    It's only after we've lost everything that we are free to do anything.
  • (4/5)
    I would if I could but I can't talk about this.