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Bone Gap

Bone Gap

Scritto da Laura Ruby

Narrato da Dan Bittner


Bone Gap

Scritto da Laura Ruby

Narrato da Dan Bittner

valutazioni:
4/5 (99 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
8 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 3, 2015
ISBN:
9780062368096
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

National Book Award Finalist * Printz Award Winner for Best Young Adult Book of the Year

"Ruby's novel deserves to be read and reread. It is powerful, beautiful, extraordinary."-School Library Journal

Everyone knows Bone Gap is full of gaps.

So when young, beautiful Roza went missing, the people of Bone Gap weren't surprised. But Finn knows what really happened to Roza. He knows she was kidnapped by a dangerous man whose face he cannot remember.

As we follow the stories of Finn, Roza, and the people of Bone Gap, acclaimed author Laura Ruby weaves a tale of the ways in which the face the world sees is never the sum of who we are.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Mar 3, 2015
ISBN:
9780062368096
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Informazioni sull'autore

Laura Ruby is the author of books for adults, teens, and children, including Thirteen Doorways, Wolves Behind Them All and the Michael L. Printz Medal winner Bone Gap, both National Book Award finalists; the Edgar Award nominee Lily’s Ghosts; and the Book Sense Pick Good Girls as well as the first two books in the York Saga. She is on the faculty of Hamline University’s MFA in writing for children and young adults program and lives in the Chicago area. You can visit her online at www.lauraruby.com.

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99 valutazioni / 46 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    This book received many honors, including the 2015 Michael Printz award, a National Book Award Finalist, and one of the top ten best fiction for Young Adults Top Ten.Few can write magic realism and make it work as well as Alice Hoffman or Sarah Addison Allen, yet Laura Ruby was successful in making this work in Bone Gap.While at times the plot seemed somewhat convoluted, I stayed with the book, and I'm glad I did. Bone Gap is a small town, one in which everyone knows each other. And, as usual, small towns have their noisy neighbors, their near-do-wells, and a smattering to those who try to rise above the fray and all that is stifling about small-town life. The book begins with the disappearance of Rosa who left the town as mysteriously as she entered. Finn saw the abduction, but cannot recall the details. Finn is known by many names throughout the town, most of them dealt with his inability to stay on track. We follow the story of Finn who hears the corn talk to him in his rural setting, who allows the nasty Rude brothers to pick on him and beat him up, and we also know that Finn has a gift of understanding people. He knows his brother loves Rosa, but he is to afraid to try to find herr.As Finn finds a love of his own and in this strength learns his abilities to face what seems impossible to rescue his brother's love. Only Finn can rescue Rosa, and it is a very difficult task. As the magic both prevents and aids him.Three and 1/2 stars!
  • (3/5)
    After finishing this YA "fantasy" book up a couple of days ago, I'm still not quite decided on where I stand. And maybe where I stand is "This would be great for semi-mature YAs - they'd totally connect with the storyline and characters!" Was it great for me, personally? It was just okay. It felt more like a realistic fiction novel than fantasy and in that regard I was disappointed. But did I keep reading? Yeah, I did, and not because I had to. So there's that.
  • (4/5)
    Bone Gap is a YA novel that blurs the lines between straight up fantasy and magical realism and draws on fairy tales.Bone Gap is a small town in rural America and the home of Finn and Sean O’Sullivan. Their mother left them years ago, and the brothers were alone until the beautiful Roza arrived in their lives. But Roza has disappeared again, and most of Bone Gap believes she left as mysteriously as she came. Finn O’Sullivan knows she didn’t. He knows what he saw, even if no one else believes him. Roza was kidnapped by a dangerous man in a black SUV. Searches turn up nothing, and Finn is unable to describe the man’s face. The town does not believe him, not even his brother Sean.It would be so easy for Roza to become nothing more than a quest object, but instead this is her story as much as Finn’s, Sean’s or anyone else in the novel. Bone Gap alternates viewpoints, at first mainly between Finn and Roza, but it later adds Sean and Petey’s viewpoint. While most of the town believes Finn must have been in love with the beautiful Roza, it is Petey, the ugly beekeeper, he loves.Aside from the magical realm the man spirits Roza way too, Bone Gap is set in the real world. Yet the entire novel is embedded with a sense of the magical, leaving you straining to hear the whispering voices of the corn fields.Roza’s story is an examination of the story of the woman who’s “fairest in the land.” In these stories, the woman becomes a prize to be won, an object to be fought over. No one sees the person, just the beauty. So it goes for Roza, for whom her beauty is more of a curse than a blessing. Roza is placed within the role of the damsel, but it is a role that she fights against.I think Bone Gap would appeal to people who don’t normally read fantasy novels. In particular, those with a love of mythology might enjoy it. All in all, this is a book that I would confidently recommend to anyone with a love for a deftly woven story.Originally posted on The Illustrated Page.
  • (3/5)
    I love Magical Realism, but this is not the kind of magical realism I'm accustomed to. Or at least I've never read anything like it before. I didn't mind that it was different from what I usually read, but my main issue with this particular story was that I didn't feel invested for a least eighty percent of it. I just couldn't wait to finish, I felt no connection to the characters or the story. Yes the writing was definitely good and I didn't dislike anyone really, I could sympathize with their troubles and thought the quirkiness of the town and the people were interesting, but I still wasn't able develop that deep invested connection. Also I kinda got this déjà vu, I've read this vibe from it, I was getting a beauty and the beast type of story. Overall it wasn't too much of a bad read for me personally since I didn't end up dnf'ing it.
  • (3/5)
    I didn't much care for the magical realism. Although the magical parts were integral to the plot, they didn't feel well integrated into the world of Bone Gap. I also felt that Finn's difficulties with facial recognition were dealt with in enough depth. It was an interesting twist and I wanted more, such as a section from Sean's perspective when he found out about it.Dan Bittner did a very good job narrating, especially in Roza's voice.
  • (5/5)
    A slow burn of a young adult mystery with strong hints of magical realism that feels like riding a carousel at a very creepy abandoned carnival of ghosts.This book took me pleasantly by surprise - it started slow and quiet, but built itself up to stealthily into a burning climax. Wonderful usage of magical realism, fantastic twist, down-to-earth genuine romantic relationships between teens which is a rarity in YA lit, and a powerful message about love, and sight.
  • (4/5)
    Unlike most reviewers, I enjoyed the buildup far more than the climax. The climax and "twist" (what the hell is the twist people are talking about?) were really flat, uneventful and, lackluster to me. Getting to know the characters was the best part of the book. Trying to figure out what was going on and how things would come together was far more rewarding than them actually coming together.
  • (5/5)
    This subtly speculative novel about two brothers facing loss and a young woman fighting for her freedom from a kidnapper is absolutely gorgeous. I love the way each of the characters are portrayed and the magical realism of this small town, where everybody knows everything about everyone, even if they always get the story wrong.
  • (2/5)
    I don't usually do audiobooks, but I have been taking a lot of long (5-10 mile) walks as part of my backpacking training and I am getting bored!!I picked some young adult titles because I am not a great listener, so YA works well for me. I did not realize this was magical realism until I got to the crux of the story and--ta-da! magical realism! difficult situation solved! So frustrating. The story was good up to that point, and I was so curious how it would be worked out.The narrator was fine, other than his female voices. Particularly his voice of Roza, a native Polish speaker. It was not good--it sounded like a 15-year-old making fun of someone. But, I will continue to try some more audiobooks.
  • (5/5)
    A wonderful, rare work of YA magical realism.
  • (5/5)
    I WANNA GIVE THIS BOOK A BIG HUG

    (Caution, long preface below)

    Here's the thing: I've been reading YA for a while now, and one thing that has been consistently bothering me in the genre?and in other genres too, this is by no means exclusive to YA, it's just particularly prominent/concentrated in YA?has been the number of female characters described as beautiful. Stunning. Gorgeous. Not once, not twice, but over and over and over again. I pretty much enter every book nowadays expecting the default physical appearance of female characters to be "otherworldly beauty." My motto has become all female characters are beautiful unless described as otherwise. It's not so much the beauty that bothers me as much as it is its ubiquity and the amount of times that it's brought up. Everyone has their self-esteem issues, and for me, it's hard to feel close to a character whose beauty feels as if it is transcendent, on another plane of existence or something. Or, if not feel close to them, at least see myself in them. Give me characters with plain faces, give me characters with unusual faces, give me characters who aren't beautiful. Here is where Bone Gap comes into the discussion. When I heard that this book had feminist themes of beauty and physical appearance at its core, I jumped at the chance to read it. And lemme tell you, Bone Gap did not disappoint.

    What Bone Gap nailed:
    ? As aforementioned, this book delves into feminist themes surrounding beauty, and lack thereof. We have Roza, a character who is constantly described as beautiful by everyone she comes across, and Petey, a character who is defined by how ugly she is deemed. By setting up these two seemingly dichotomous characters, Ruby shows how women are forced to navigate milieux where, ultimately, no matter what they do, nothing is ever good enough. When Roza rejects abusive men who force themselves on her, they accuse her of being vain, of thinking she's beneath them because she is beautiful. When Petey begins a loving, caring relationship with Finn, the town assumes that Petey somehow coerced him into it out of desperation, or that Finn simply did it out of pity, all because she is ugly. Ruby does such a fantastic job of setting up these two women, one that possesses and one that lacks, and using the contrast between them to drive home a powerful message. If anything, this book shows you just how defining a gaze can be. But more importantly, it shows you how much more powerful the gazed-at's definition can be.
    ? The characters in this book are wonderful and sweet and endearing and I love them and I want to give them all big hugs. Finn is a precious soul who must be protected at all costs. Petey is all bravado and snark on the outside, but on the inside she's just as gooey as Finn. Roza, regardless of how many times she is beaten down and tired, never loses that ray of sunshine that makes her such a joy to read about. These characters, particularly Roza and Petey, could've fallen apart so easily?but they didn't. Petey was fragile, unable to believe that anyone would see worth in her. Roza was almost always scared, conditioned to look down and cover up. However, these powerful ladies are never defined by their conflicts, they never drown in self-pity or angst. And having read my fair share of self-pitying, angsty protagonists, I can tell you that that's a pretty hard balance to achieve.
    ? The writing style in this book is so lovely and whimsical. It kind of reminded me of a toned-down combination of Neil Gaiman and Maggie Stiefvater's writing styles. Ruby describes Bone Gap as a "rural fairy tale," and I have to say that that description is perfectly mirrored in her writing (and her story).
    ? ANIMALS. I freaking love animals, and there were so many in this book. Glorious, majestic horses. Tiny, cute lil' kittens. Super cool and interesting bees (and Petey is a beekeeper!!! I don't know about you, but beekeeping sounds like a completely badass job to me). Dogs that Sleep in Lanes. It's little things like that that are just the cherry on top of a poignant, engaging story.

    I loved it. What more can I say?
  • (5/5)
    This novel of magical realism centers around a mysterious disappearance in a small town with unexplained gaps--gaps of memory and gaps between worlds. Finn doesn't fit in and can't figure out why; he witnessed the abduction of Roza, his brother's girlfriend, but can't describe the assailant; he's drawn to the beekeeper's daughter who is burdened by the town's prejudices; and he must travel between the gaps to save Roza.
  • (2/5)
    Many thanks to Faber & Faber for providing me with an advanced copy of this book.Bone Gap is a hard novel to describe. I could call it a thriller but that's not all there is to it. I could call it a fantasy story, or a feminist faerie tale, but that doesn't quite cover it. To me, it's like the literary equivalent of Twin Peaks. It's about the disappearance of a girl from a town that's not quite right, seeming to exist as more of a gateway to another place, and how that disappearance affects the people that have been left behind. It's a very ambitious story but, unfortunately, I felt that it was often a bit too ambitious for its own good.Bone Gap is incredibly slow moving a rife with metaphor. It's a novel that you really have to pay attention to, as even the most insignificant occurrence could be vitally important to the plot. Unfortunately this also made it quite tiring to read. It's a long time before the tiny details start drawing together, forming a modern day retelling of a popular Greek myth. While everything does ultimately make sense, you really have to stick with it for well over two hundred pages to reach this point.The novel is pretty and lyrically written, but I often got the feeling that this masked an underlying weakness in the plot. Under Bone Gap's beautiful prose, there is little substance. It felt almost like two novels smooshed together - a beautiful fantasy story and sub-par mystery. So much of it felt contrived, from Finn randomly chasing his horse towards traffic out of the blue (the plot required his brother to be mad at him) to the fact that the police refuse to investigate a missing person's report. I felt that the story should have possibly focused on either one or the other, as the shift between the mundane and the fantastical was sometimes quite jarring.The characterisation in the novel also gave me some pause. One of the things I found most interesting about the novel was how it treated the concept of feminine beauty. We see this contrasted between the two female leads - Roza and Petey. One is beautiful (and is mistreated by a succession of men who are only interested in her because of it) and the other is considered ugly and pitied for it (because men will take advantage of her because of it). This was where Bone Gap was most interesting, in the way that it held the mirror up to society's treatment of women and showed how ugly it is.Yet the characters themselves often felt shallow. There are too many horrible men in book. Virtually everyone objectifies women to some degree, even if they initially seem to be caring and kind. The only truly nice man in the story is Finn. Even Sean, who is portrayed as a local hero, immediately assumes that Roza has just left him when she disappears. There also seems to be a lack of research in the Polish used in the novel. While I don't speak this language, a quick Google search revealed to me some errors in genders and spelling. I'd personally expect an author to put a little more research in if they wish to include a different language in the novel.In all, Bone Gap was very beautiful and offered some interesting food for thought, but I found it too slow and surprisingly shallow to read. It's not greatly memorable and I'd probably only recommend it to people who are fans of surrealist fantasy.
  • (5/5)
    This was an amazing read. The story kept jumping between reality and magic reality. Characters are believable. I dove into this novel, and just tore through it. I will read it again. The poetry of character's thoughts, feelings and perceptions was unexpected and delightful. Everything moved the story forward. So much magic, so much believable magic. This was a santathing surprise and I'm just thrilled with it!!
  • (4/5)
    This is a young adult book that was free this year in the audio sync program. One comment, there is a bit of sexual content, mild yes, no details but some heavy petting going on. A story set in Bone Gap, Illinois. I was pretty sure that it is fictional but, hey, who knew. If you google it there is a place called Bone Gap. The story features a rag tag bunch of characters; Finn the main character is described pretty much as a spacey kid, his brother Sean, Petey the beekeeper's daughter, Roza the girl from Poland here studying botany, the Rude Boys (bullies) and Charlie Valentine (not his real name). Besides the amusing array of characters there is a long list of animals; Calamity the Cat, the goat, the horse, the chickens, the dog in the lane, murder of crows, etc. Then there is the corn. The corn whispers. The story revolves around Roza going missing. But it also is told from different perspectives of Finn, Roza, Petey. Oh, and less I forget, there is a bit of botany (plants, gardening) going on as well. A pretty good story, maybe a bit too much stuff going on for some readers but after I settled into the story, I liked it. It also won quite a few awards or made some short lists. Having just read How to read Literature Like a Professor, I can recommend this book as a good exercise. If you want no spoils, don't read the rest. This story is based on the mythology of Persephone. Roza goes missing, Finn sees her leave and thinks maybe she wanted to go but he is not sure and he can't describe the man that takes her. He can't talk to Sean who loved Roza. Petey is mad at Finn for not being able to see her for what she is. Of course the story of Persephone is that she is the daughter of Demeter. Hades falls in love with her and takes her to Hades. Finn is on a quest, his quest is to find Roza but he also finds himself in this quest. Finn enters the corn, he finds the stream (river Styx), he "finds" Roza with his unique vision and he, Roza and Russ escape back through the corn to Bone Gap.
  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Amazing! I was sucked into this story and transported to a magical land. A truly unique novel.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Intriguing and held me captive throughout the whole book.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (5/5)
    I really liked this one. 4.5 stars. I may come back later and round it up to 5. I don't know if I've read anything quite like it. The magical realism was just right. The characters were great. I might review this one on the blog later, so keep an eye out for a longer review.
  • (5/5)
    That started out like a fever dream and ended in perfection, or, perhaps, vice versa. Either way.
  • (4/5)
    Mysterious enough to keep you turning the pages to find out what happens to the characters-all of whom I cared about.
  • (3/5)
    Bone Gap isn't a place you stay in, it's a place you leave, which is why when young, beautiful, mysterious Roza goes missing no one believes that she was taken, they think she ran off, moved on to the next city, forgetting all about Bone Gap and it's inhabitants before she even crossed the state line. However Finn know's the truth, Roza would never leave him or his brother, Sean. Not without a goodbye, an explanation, something. So he sets out to find her, following the smallest clues and the tiniest of hunches, never giving up hope. Bone Gap is a beautiful, strange, wonderous book that haunts the reader long after they've finished it. Amazon - Barnes and Noble - Book Depository---------------------------------------------I knew from the second I picked up this book that it was going to be so hard to review it. It was hard enough to decide how many stars to give it let alone talk about my opinions towards it and how I liked/disliked certain aspects. First off, this is the weirdest book I have ever read, it has these moments of pure clarity and realization and understanding and before you have time to acknowledge those moments or contemplate them they are suddenly overcome with these unexplainable events or odd, perplexing scenes that leave you wondering if you're reading the same book you were two minutes ago. I'm not going to lie I had a love hate relationship with most of this book. It instantly reminded me of "Lovely Bones" which I don't even think I finished because I despised ever second of it (including the movie) but for some reason I really enjoyed "Bone Gap". I wouldn't recommend this book to everyone but if you're okay with unusual characters and somewhat paranormal undertones I'd check it out. Until next time, Ginger In compliance with FTC guidelines I am disclosing that this book was given to me for free to review. My review is my honest opinion.
  • (4/5)
    Thanks to Edelweiss and the publisher for access to this title.

    I went into this without knowing anything about the book, and I found it wonderful and amazing! It started off as a contemporary story about a boy in a small town and took off from there with adventure and mystery and magic. While I didn't relate to this directly as a retold fairytale, I would recommend it to those who enjoy the more obsure and strange retolds. And also for fans of Nancy Werlin's Impossible.
  • (4/5)
    This is a lovely, lyrical read. Finn is a lonely teenager who lives with his older brother every since their mother left a few years ago. The brothers take in a young woman, Rosa, who later disappears. Throughout the book the point of view switches between the main characters. The reader realizes somewhere into the book that something is different at Bone Gap, the place is perhaps somewhat magical - and not always in a good way. I wasn't totally satisfied with the ending, but must say that this felt like a different type of story than most, and I did enjoy that experience.
  • (5/5)
    A beautiful Polish girl shows up one day in Sean and Finn's barn, hurt and frightened. 17 year old Finn takes her to his older brother, strong, silent Sean who matter-of-factly takes care of her injuries and offers her food. Roza decides to stay on with the brothers as she is in a country far from home and has escaped from a kidnapper, intent on keeping her and all of her beauty for himself.The 3 bond together and the brothers enjoy the warmth Roza brings to their broken family with her knowledge of growing fresh vegetables and making good foods. Finn discovers a magic horse in the barn one day and starts riding it with Petey, an outcast because of her unusual looks. Finn doesn't care what she looks like though; in fact he is bullied because he never can remember faces anyhow. But he does know he is comfortable with her, as Sean and Roza develop a strong sense of comfort with each other on their own. One day, the 3 decide to venture forth to the town fair and all good things come to a screeching halt. Roza is spotted by her former kidnapper and taken again, with only Finn as a witness. She seems to be going willingly with the man, but as she gets in the car, Finn realizes too late that she was forced to do so in order to save him. With Finn's inability to describe the man, the people of Bone Gap think it is all a story and why would Roza stay with the boys when even their own mother wouldn't ? But this story isn't simple and although Roza has slipped into a gap not exactly real, all hope is not given up. This twisted fairy tale story brings out questions about beauty in our society, how things and people aren't always what they seem and what true bravery is. This 2016 Printz winner is for ages 14 and up for incidental sex, but more for the brutality of the world.
  • (5/5)
    Lovely prose, satisfying mystery, a story that pivots around the expectations of who rescues whom and why, Bone Gap is one of those books that I couldn't bring myself to return to the library when I was finished reading it because I just couldn't bear not having it around to hold. Can't think of much higher praise than that! This book should win all of the awards because it's so good at winning your heart. :-)
  • (5/5)
    In a small town, everyone knows everyone's business. They all know that Sean takes care of his brother Finn since their mother left, and that Finn is different. Now a beautiful girl who appeared in their barn has disappeared. Finn claims she was kidnapped, but can't describe the kidnapper.
  • (3/5)
    Narrated by Dan Bittner. Just when I thought I had this book pegged as a kidnapping thriller, the story veered into dreamlike directions time and again. Where is this book going? What is it really about? Beauty? Acceptance of self and others? Finding the soul behind the stranger? Not for teens who prefer their stories cut and dry but an intriguing journey for those who take it. Bittner's narration kept me attuned for the most part, evoking the atmosphere of a Midwestern small town where everyone knows everyone, and bringing out the memorable aspects of certain characters such as Petey, Roza, Finn and Charlie Valentine.
  • (4/5)
    Tells the story of two brothers and the woman who came in to their lives, Roza, and just as quickly was taken when she was kidnapped. Finn couldn't describe the kidnapper except for the way he moves. A beautiful story, part mythology, part magic, part realistic fiction. Using a narrator and alternating focus on Roza and Finn, the story unfolds as Finn falls in love with Petey, he gets pets who show up and connect with him, and he figures out where Roza has been taken. Roza is trapped by a strange, icy man who wants her to love him. Complicated, lovely, and strange.
  • (4/5)
    Bone Gap, Illinois is a little different than most places. No geological feature produced the name of the town. Instead other gaps exist. Finn and Sean O'Sullivan live there. Sean always dreamed of going to medical school, but his plans were thwarted when his mother ran off with a man. He did the responsible thing, got a job driving the ambulance and taking care of his adolescent brother. Finn finds a Polish woman named Roza in their barn. They know she's running from something but aren't sure what. When she goes missing, Finn is the only one to have witnessed what appeared to be a kidnapping by a man in a black SUV. But was it a kidnapping or did she go willingly? Finn is unable to describe then man he saw take her. Life isn't the same after Roza is gone. The townspeople always thought Finn a little odd, and now they find him even odder. No one really believes him. Finn befriends Petey, a girl who hates her given name of Priscilla. At times the two of them get a glimpse of a place neither had ever known to be near Bone Gap. Will Finn or Sean find Roza or will they just give up? The reader also gets Roza's story and is kept abreast of what is happening to her while she is in the "gap." This book is described as magical realism. It combines reality with fantasy. It makes for an odd but compelling novel. The audience is definitely teens, but adults will enjoy it as well. I listened to the Harper Audio version offered this summer through AudioSync. This is not my usual genre. Although I found the book strange, I was compelled to keep listening.
  • (5/5)
    Wow! This is a wonderful story full of mystery, magical whispering, gateways to other worlds and lessons on how we see (and don't always see) the beauty in ourselves and others. Full of charming, rich characters and wonderful atmosphere.