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The Hypnotists #01

The Hypnotists #01

Scritto da Gordon Korman

Narrato da Ramon de Ocampo


The Hypnotists #01

Scritto da Gordon Korman

Narrato da Ramon de Ocampo

valutazioni:
4/5 (19 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
5 ore
Pubblicato:
Aug 1, 2013
ISBN:
9780545643580
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

An all-new, mesmerizing adventure from the masterful Gordon Korman! Jackson Opus has always been persuasive, but he doesn't know that he's descended from the two most powerful hypnotist bloodlines on the planet. He's excited to be accepted into a special program at the Sentia Institute -- but when he realizes he's in over his head, Jackson will have to find a way to use his powers to save his friends, his parents, and his government.
Pubblicato:
Aug 1, 2013
ISBN:
9780545643580
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Gordon Korman published his first book at age fourteen and since then has written more than ninety middle grade and teen novels. Favorites include the New York Times bestselling Ungifted, Supergifted, The Unteachables, Pop, Schooled, and the Masterminds series. Gordon lives with his family on Long Island, New York. You can visit him online at www.gordonkorman.com.

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    this was my very first Gordon Korman book...dang what was I waiting on???? A fairly quick read, Jax has always thought himself to be a little odd. Little did he know that he has a long family history of hypnotists....on both sides of the family. Enter The Sentia Institute...a place for hypnos to fine tune their skills. Jax thinks the institute is great until he learns that things are not as they seem.
  • (5/5)
    Jax Opus is a pretty ordinary kid except that he has a gift as a hypnotist. He is descended from two families noted for this ability. When it is discovered, he is offered a place at Sentia which is operated by Elias Mako who "has devoted his life to New York City education and is an inspiration to every single one of us." At first, Jax feels that Sentia is a waste of his time since no one will tell them what they are doing. He also has trouble getting to know the other kids there who are all really busy trying to be the best hypnotists.Jax finally gets to the stage where he is making some progress when he meets a guy from a rival organization called the Sandmen who tells him Mako is not the benefactor to humanity that he says he is. When Mako convinces Jax to make a video to encourage all viewers to vote for Mako's candidate for president, Jax finally realizes that Mako isn't a good guy. But Mako has hypnotized Jax's parents and left a suggestion that they kill themselves which forces Jax to do what Mako wants. Jax has to call on the Sandmen to help him get the better of Mako in an exciting scene at the presidential candidate's victory rally. I liked Jax and thought that he was a good kid who got into a bad situation. The story was filled with action enough to keep any middle grader turning the pages. This is the first book of a three book series and will make readers want to get the rest to find out more about Jax and his abilities.
  • (3/5)
    Narrated by Ramon de Campo. Wouldn't it be fun to have powers of hypnosis and manipulate people to get what you want? With great power comes great responsibility and that's the theme here as Jax finds himself battling his mentor to save democracy. It's all very over-the-top and the adults are pretty inept, but it serves as a suspenseful escapist read for kids.
  • (2/5)
    Jax is recruited into an organization that helps people who have the power to hypnotize others learn to use and control their powers. Jax is special even among hypnotists as he is the descendent of two famous mesmerizing families. The head of the organization tries to use Jax's amazing abilities to affect politics and Jax ends up getting help from a rival organization.

    So the book starts off very action and adventure...peters out in the middle....and then gets all action again at the end. It was the slow middle that killed me, that and Jax's blind trust just about killed the book for me. There was a lack of new information about the institute, the things Jax was learning weren't that interesting and it got a bit repetitive.
  • (5/5)
    I received a copy to facilitate my review. The opinions expressed here are my own.I’ve read several of this author’s books and like them. This book starts out action packed. Jackson Opus (Jax) keeps seeing visions. When he does, strange things happen. For example, in the beginning of the book he and his friend are running late for the championship playoffs. One bus after another pass them by. Jax steps out in front of an oncoming bus. He has a vision then the bus stops. As he hops on he tells the driver where he needs to go and how quickly he gets there. The driver ignores all other stops, runs stop lights and gets them there. On the court Jax has another vision as he is guarding the star player for the other team. His team wins. His parents take him to an eye doctor and to a psychiatrist. Both times Jax has a vision and then the doctors do strange things. He has to find out what is causing the visions. Jax finally meets the person that can help him. However, he learns there is so much more to his “gift” and must learn to use it to save everything he loves the most. This is fast paced action at its best. It is one of the quickest and easiest reads, a great middle school book.
  • (3/5)
    The Hypnotists by Gordon Korman is a frightening look at the corruption of power.Jax Opus is twelve years old and descends from famous hypnotists although he doesn't know this fact. He starts to see himself and people do strange things. Come to find out, it's the connection he makes with another person and they do whatever he says. A hypnotist figures this out and brings him to the premier school for hypnotists that Jax attends after regular school and on Saturdays. He also meets hypnotists that are older and so are no longer associated with the school, using their powers to steal and/or make life easier for themselves. Jax is so powerful that the head of the Institute, Dr. Mako, tries experimenting with Jax's powers and realizes that Jax can accomplish what no one else ever has. Jax's parents are not so happy with this gift, as his father spent his life worried his parents were influencing his likes and behaviors. He no longer will look at his son directly because by avoiding his eyes, he should be able to avoid being "bent" by Jax. When Dr. Mako accomplishes what has never been accomplished, he doesn't realize the consequences to Jax. I guess this would be science fiction because this ability doesn't exist, at least to my knowledge. Otherwise, it seems to take place in the real world. It's an good book, not great, but good.
  • (4/5)
    Korman's new novel The Hypnotists is the first Gordon Korman novel I've read in YEARS--and I was not disappointed. This middle grade novel was exciting, packed with suspense and, of course, the art of hypnotism. The power of the human mind to change the world is a crucial focal point of the novel and the ways that Dr. Mako is ability to manipulate an entire city into believing the truths he implants in their minds and rig an election really makes you think about the 'what if.' For a society that is so dependent on the Internet, and particularly social media outlets like social media, if true hypnotism was possible, Korman's story points out just how much danger we would all be in. The Hypnotists discusses hypnotism in the sense of subliminal messages, behavioural modification, and psychological manipulation. He does call attention to the other kind--the type that exists in psychiatrist's offices, but hypnotism for medicinal purposes doesn't possess the same power that people like Mako and Jackson have.Jackson Opus is a young boy who has a natural hypnotic abilities as the descendent of two powerful hypnotist families. He is recruited by the Sentia Institute where his powers are honed. He meets other hypnotists and sees how the mind can be tricked, changed, and forced into doing what another wants as easily as looking at someone and focusing.Of course, nothing is what it seems and Jackson has to figure out who the real enemy is as weird things start happening. Soon, Jackson's friends, family, and the entire city are in great danger as a certain someone starts using hypnotism for very wrong and self-serving reasons. It's a classic story of great power in the wrong hands; an immoral use of something that CAN be used for good.The climax of the novel--the showdown between Jackson and person X--had me hooked on every word. The ending, where we see Jackson's maturity and selflessness, was what really took me off-guard. You won't see it coming either. From beginning to end, this book is great. Don't be put off by the fact that it's middle grade. Gordon Korman is one hell of a writer. I can't imagine what he could do with this novel written for adults.Sure, the changing eye-colour part of Korman's hypnotism was a little cheesy, but the undeniable power and ability of these people to hypnotize mass groups of people without their awareness and through the use of the Internet (basically through Youtube--now THERE is a scary possible reality for us!) was terrifying and exciting. As many people do believe that hypnotism is real, the book is able to hit home. Especially if you, like me, have ever gone to see a hypnotist perform on stage.Much like fellow YA heroes, Harry Potter and Katniss Everdeen, Jackson has the entire fate of the world resting on his young shoulders. Korman takes an age-old idea and revamps it into this exciting, suspenseful, and action-packed story that both kids and adults alike will enjoy.
  • (4/5)
    Jackson Opus always seemed to find himself in the gifted classes without really knowing why. Everyone besides his best friend Tommy always seemd convinced by Jax no matter what the topic, just by looking in his eyes. When Sentia Institute finds out about him, his life is in for major change. Everyday after school and all day Saturday, Jax attends the Institute led by Dr. Elias Mako who everyone says is a leader in education and an inspiration to all of New York City. Jax finds out he has hypnotic powers in his genes from leading mezmerizers all through history. When Mako comes up with a conspiracy plan bigger than the city of New York, Jax finds himself in the middle of it. Can he manage to survive Mako's insane plan and keep his family safe? This is a page turner for grades 5-8 that will easily lead into the rest of a series.
  • (4/5)
    I can't believe I have never read a Gordon Korman book before. An ex-patriot Canadian, he wrote his first book when he was twelve and hasn't stopped since. He's one of Canada's most well known children's authors. I've had the Bruno & Boots series on my "must get around to someday" list forever! Finally I have the opportunity to read Korman's latest book and find I am well-pleased. Quite a unique plot that uses some elements I've seen before but not pulled all together this way! The book's main theme is hypnotism and it is treated as an entirely scientific matter, brain activity to be stimulated that some people have more of than others. Jax is a well-rounded hero and very likable. A bit of an outsider, he finds his groove when he understands what his strange visions mean. He's a bit slow on the uptake, with his friend Tommy figuring things out faster than he can, but other than that I enjoyed him very much. I was engrossed with the story from the first chapter and read more than half the book in one sitting, finishing it in the next. The political intrigue sub-arc reminds me of Steven King's Dead Zone in which the hero has to stop a politician from winning an election because it will lead to world destruction. Same thing goes here in "The Hypnotists" only on a lesser degree. I liked the ending which wrapped up all the story lines and gave us a final complete ending to the problems encountered in this book. One can walk away satisfied. However, the characters are obviously on the brink of more troubles which we know will come seeing as this is labeled Volume 1. Unique science fiction involving secret societies and underground institutes, should appeal to those who like conspiracy theories.
  • (4/5)
    Great for middle schoolers. Korman strikes another home run with what will surely be a series for him.
  • (3/5)
    When strange events start happening as people gaze into Jax Opus's color-changing eyes, he starts to believe he is hypnotizing them to do odd things. Jax and his parents search for someone to help him at the same time when Jax is recruited by Dr. Elias Mako, founder and director of The Sentia Institute as a mind-bending prodigy. Dr. Mako's most famous slogan, one that is repeated often, by many, is "Dr. Mako has devoted his life to New York City education and is an inspiration to every single one of us." Dr. Mako is developing Jax's inherited super-power of hypnotism...but for what cause?When Dr. Mako coerces Jax into using his gift for immoral purposes, he refuses. But, Dr. Mako has mind-bended Jax's parents to put themselves in mortal danger if Jax doesn't cooperate. How did Jax get involved in this conspiracy? How did he get himself and his parents in so much trouble? He needs help!...and fast. He is not sure who he can turn to, except the one person who he never dreamed could have helped. Together will they be able to undo all of Mako's impending destruction? Time (and maybe book #2) will tell. The Hypnotists is a fast-paced action adventure that has moral dilemmas imbedded in it. What would you do if you have the power of ultimate persuasion? Would it be used for good or evil?
  • (2/5)
    The premise of this book sounded very exciting. At first I was intrigued but this excitement only lasted for about four chapters into the book. After this I was bored but I thought I would stick with the book in the hopes that it would get intriguing again when Jax arrived and honed in his skills at Sentia Institute. Which at first my interest did peak up again some but it was evident quickly that there was nothing really fascinating about Jax and his skill. Ok, maybe this is not fully true as this book probably would have been better if the rest of the characters were exciting, the dialect better, and there was heightened action. Yet for the younger readers they may like this book.