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Greek Lives

Greek Lives

Scritto da Plutarch

Narrato da Nicholas Farrell


Greek Lives

Scritto da Plutarch

Narrato da Nicholas Farrell

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (13 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
7 ore
Pubblicato:
Apr 17, 2000
ISBN:
9789629547325
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Plutarch’s series of biographies was the first of its kind, as much ground breaking in conception as Herodotus was with his Histories. Plutarch looked at the great men of the Ancient World and told their stories, in many cases drawing on sources no longer available to us. They offer a unique insight into the characters as well as the achievements of men who influenced their age and the empires that their culture dominated. They are as accessible now as they were when they were first written. It is the companion volume to Roman Lives, also read with style by Nicholas Farrell on Naxos AudioBooks.
Pubblicato:
Apr 17, 2000
ISBN:
9789629547325
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Plutarch was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Lives and Moralia. He is classified as a Middle Platonist. Plutarch’s surviving works were written in Greek, but intended for both Greek and Roman readers.

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    Or "Come for Alexander, stay for Alcibiades".I wanted to better my knowledge of Alexander the Great but my copy of Herodotus's Histories was looking excessively large so when I saw "Greek Lives" for sale I snapped it up.I wish I'd bought a "Complete Lives" instead. It's so good.Plutarch brings the lives and times to life in an interesting way, and the translator does a very good job of making the work flow and be understandable without resorting to artificial modernising.I could have done with some of the chapter introductions being fuller, some of them assumed knowledge I most certainly didn't have (the 4 1/2 out of 5 is because of that, Plutarch himself gets 5/5). Some of the footnotes/endnotes were a bit enigmatic too.I think I agree with the idea put forward in the introduction that Plutarch wrote these to suggest good ways to be a public person of power, particularly if you consider the different way Cimon is treated depending on the message Plutarch is conveying in a life.Poor Agesilaus who, after a certain point, couldn't get anything right for trying to the right thing, was completely new to me, and I learned a lot about Ancient Greece.Definitely worth reading.