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All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror
All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror
All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror
Audiolibro10 ore

All the Shah's Men: An American Coup and the Roots of Middle East Terror

Scritto da Stephen Kinzer

Narrato da Michael Prichard

Valutazione: 4.5 su 5 stelle

4.5/5

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Info su questo audiolibro

Half a century ago, the United States overthrew the democratically elected prime minister of Iran, Mohammad Mossadegh, whose "crime" was nationalizing the country's oil industry.



In a cloak-and-dagger story of spies, saboteurs, and secret agents, Kinzer reveals the involvement of Eisenhower, Churchill, Kermit Roosevelt, and the CIA in Operation Ajax, which restored Mohammad Reza Shah to power. Reza imposed a tyranny that ultimately sparked the Islamic Revolution of 1979, which, in turn, inspired fundamentalists throughout the Muslim world, including the Taliban and terrorists who thrived under its protection.



"It is not far-fetched," Kinzer asserts, "to draw a line from Operation Ajax through the Shah's repressive regime and the Islamic Revolution to the fireballs that engulfed the World Trade Center in New York."

Nota del redattore

In the news…

As tensions heat up between the US and Iran, this journalist’s account of the CIA-backed coup that overthrew the Iranian prime minister in 1953 sheds light on how the attack’s aftershocks continue to rattle relations today.

LinguaEnglish
Data di uscita1 dic 2003
ISBN9781400171064
Autore

Stephen Kinzer

Stephen Kinzer is the author of many books, including The True Flag, The Brothers, Overthrow, and All the Shah’s Men. An award-winning foreign correspondent, he served as the New York Times bureau chief in Nicaragua, Germany, and Turkey. He is a senior fellow at the Watson Institute for International and Public Affairs at Brown University, and writes a world affairs column for the Boston Globe. He lives in Boston.

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Recensioni su All the Shah's Men

Valutazione: 4.728813559322034 su 5 stelle
4.5/5

59 valutazioni19 recensioni

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  • Valutazione: 5 su 5 stelle
    5/5
    This should be required reading for every American. Was even better as an audiobook than a read.
  • Valutazione: 5 su 5 stelle
    5/5
    Packed with information and history. Told very well like a story would be. All The Shah's Men is really insightful on the coup in Iran and really explains the sentiment felt to Americans.
  • Valutazione: 5 su 5 stelle
    5/5
    Easy listen. Very interesting.
    Not anything you’d learn in a history class.
  • Valutazione: 5 su 5 stelle
    5/5
    If this book was a mandatory reading, my country, the United States would be a better place.
  • Valutazione: 5 su 5 stelle
    5/5
    An amazing writer, Stephen Kinzer gives a thorough explanation behind the '53 coup. He goes into great detail of the relationships between Iran, Britain, and the United States, laying out the political and socioeconomic atmosphere that led to the decisions that had been made.
  • Valutazione: 5 su 5 stelle
    5/5
    It was very engaging. Not only are you learning a history you're probably not aware of but you can understand what's going on during that moment in history.
  • Valutazione: 5 su 5 stelle
    5/5
    I very much enjoyed listening to this detailed and honest remark of events preceding and proceeding the 1953 British-American coup in Iran. This is a great story of one man's rise to national heroism and fall as a traitor through acts of foreign conspiracy. The main character in this book is Dr. Mohammad Mosaddegh, the democratically elected Prime Minister of Iran in late 1940s and early 1950s. Spirited by nationalism and mourning for the well-being of Iranian people whose potential wealth was being exploited by the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company (AIOC), he rose to power through democratic elections and managed to nationalize Iran's oil, much in the same way that the British had done to their homeland properties. The British, utterly angered at such a "loss", tried every trick possible that they found in the books, including unending and relentless attempts to persuade President Truman to act against the Iranian PM. Truman, who seems to have been a man of wisdom, countered the British and suggested they, too, come to reason and offer a more just and fair deal to the Iranians - similar to America's 50-50 deal with Saudi Arabia through Arabian American Company (Aramco). The British did not show any enthusiasm in being fair to the Iranians, whom they demeaned through their countless communications. They even blocked any attempts by Truman to deal with Iran and imposed some of the crippling economic and oil sanctions on the country.
    Things took a different turn, though, as Eisenhower took office of the President in the US and showed much more interest in cooperating with the British than his predecessor. Convinced by Churchill that Mosaddegh is leaning towards communism and that Iran may soon be occupied by the Soviets, Eisenhower allocated substantial sums of money and personnel through the CIA to conduct "Operation Ajax" (or "Operation Boot" as the British call it) to overthrow Mosaddegh.
    These detailed remarks clearly illustrate that the West's interest to appoint "friendly" leaders in oil-rich countries, as indicated in the communications between the UK and the US, isn't something new, but dates back to early-mid 20th century. Oil has always been the reason for conspiracy and war in the Middle East, but the western powers know very well that if they want to give their plots a chance to succeed, they must divert the attention from the main cause to "humane" reasons such as democracy and liberty - none of which do they care about for the people of the countries whom they invade and occupy.
    The actions of the west in such countries is always followed by unintended consequences. As clearly and eloquently stated in this book, after the success of the coup, the UK and US appointed Shah as the Iranian king who had shown high respect and dependence to them than Mosaddegh. The coward incompetent king who fled the country anytime crisis broke in Iran (so much so that he only agreed with the coup under the condition that he could flee Iran if the coup was unsuccessful - which he actually did), not only didn't have sympathy for the Iranian people, but also sought nothing but personal gain. The monarch dictator, then, became hostile to the west by bringing up the oil issue and - as history repeats itself - he, too, had to leave. This was not, however, the only unintended consequence of the 1953 coup. The 1979 Islamic Revolution brought about more chaotic circumstances in the country and the region, which and the following events (such as the hostage crisis) would have been avoided if the Americans had not intervened in Iran's affairs in 1950s.
    This, in summary, is an eye-opening book that tells the reader why Shah was not at all a good solution for Iran and why Iran (and no other country, for that matter) should never trust the West on such friendly offers like democracy and liberty.
  • Valutazione: 4 su 5 stelle
    4/5
    Hindsight, of course, is 20/20, but this is certainly a damning indictment of the shortsightedness of American foreign policy in the Middle East.
  • Valutazione: 4 su 5 stelle
    4/5
    Short primer on Iranian history, then fairly detailed account of the rise of the secular, populist Mossadegh and the British-spurred, American-financed coup against him. Truman sympathized with nationalist aspirations, but Eisenhower (and the Dulles brothers in charge of foreign policy) was more sympathetic to fears of Communist takeover, even though that wasn’t really what was going on in Iran. So America backed the shah, because he was friendlier to Britain’s oil interests, and bought “stability” for 25 years at the cost of brutal repression and then passionate anti-Americanism when bottled-up popular demands finally exploded. Depressing but useful history, emphasizing the mismatch between Iranian aspirations (not to be stripped of their oil for a pittance, not to be treated like lesser human beings by the British) and British/American preoccupations (global dominance, Communism).
  • Valutazione: 3 su 5 stelle
    3/5
    A study of the CIA's overthrow of the democratically elected government of Iran in 1952 at the urgings of Great Britian so as to restore the British control of the nationalized oil industry and reinstall the hereditary Shah.
  • Valutazione: 4 su 5 stelle
    4/5
    This is the history of the first American intervention in Iran: the 1953 CIA coup that ousted the popular and democratically elected prime minister Mohammed Mossadegh and enabled the implementation of the quarter century brutal regime of the Shah Resa Palavi. This coup tarnished , almost sigle handedly, the up to then pristine U.S. reputation in that part of the world and it left a deep scar in the collective memory of iranians up to the present day. At a time when the western powers (an the U.S. particularly) appear to have forgotten the way Iran (or Persia, as she was then known) was treated by them in the first half of the 20th century, this is a very welcome addition to the non specialist literature.