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Look Again: A Novel

Look Again: A Novel


Look Again: A Novel

valutazioni:
3.5/5 (63 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
9 ore
Pubblicato:
Apr 14, 2009
ISBN:
9781427206596
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

When reporter Ellen Gleeson gets a "Have You Seen This Child?" flyer in the mail, she almost throws it away. But something about it makes her look again, and her heart stops—the child in the photo is identical to her adopted son, Will...

Her every instinct tells her to deny the similarity between the boys, because she knows her adoption was lawful. But she's a journalist and won't be able to stop thinking about the photo until she figures out the truth. And she can't shake the question: if Will rightfully belongs to someone else, should she keep him or give him up?

She investigates, uncovering clues no one was meant to discover, and when she digs too deep, she risks losing her own life—and that of the son she loves.

Lisa Scottoline breaks new ground in Look Again, a thriller that's both heart-stopping and heart-breaking, and sure to have new fans and book clubs buzzing.

A Macmillan Audio production.

Pubblicato:
Apr 14, 2009
ISBN:
9781427206596
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Lisa Scottoline is the New York Times bestselling author of over thirty novels including Look Again, Lady Killer, Think Twice, Save Me and Everywhere That Mary Went. She also writes a weekly column, “Chick Wit,” with her daughter Francesca Serritella, for The Philadelphia Inquirer. The columns have been collected in seven volumes, including Why My Third Husband Will Be a Dog and My Nest Isn’t Empty, It Just Has More Closet Space. Scottoline has won an Edgar® Award and Cosmopolitan magazine’s “Fun Fearless Fiction” Award, and she served as the president of Mystery Writers of America. She teaches a course on justice and fiction at the University of Pennsylvania Law School, her alma mater. She lives in the Philadelphia area.

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3.7
63 valutazioni / 66 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    This is my second novel of Scottoline's and I think I am in love. I was gripped to the book from the very beginning and I did not expect the ending to happen as it did. I felt like some descriptions in the book were carried out a little too long, but I also have this nagging feeling that I missed some details. Scottoline is great at foreshadowing sublty, without hammering a point over and over.

    With this book, I kept feeling like I should make a (unfair) comparison to Jodi Picoult. Scottoline, like Picoult has written a lot of novels and they all include lawyers. However, one woman does it better, and that is Scottoline. Her books are written in third-person rather than multiple voices, and although I have never felt reading a Picoult novel that the story isn't being told well, I definitely felt like this story was told much better because of the view towards the characters. Each character had their biases and priorities, but the information was conveyed in such a way that they were somewhat equal. I really loved that.
  • (3/5)
    I read my first Lisa Scottoline last year, but unfortunate it was not for me. I owned a few more, so I decided to give Look Again a chance. This one caught my attention right from the start. This was pretty fast paced and was so much better than the last one I read. I still do not love it, but it was good. I thought it was very unrealistic and took some unexpected turns. I do think it was a little longer than it needed to be.Overall, this was ok. I did not love and I did not hate it.
  • (4/5)
    This is my second novel of Scottoline's and I think I am in love. I was gripped to the book from the very beginning and I did not expect the ending to happen as it did. I felt like some descriptions in the book were carried out a little too long, but I also have this nagging feeling that I missed some details. Scottoline is great at foreshadowing sublty, without hammering a point over and over.

    With this book, I kept feeling like I should make a (unfair) comparison to Jodi Picoult. Scottoline, like Picoult has written a lot of novels and they all include lawyers. However, one woman does it better, and that is Scottoline. Her books are written in third-person rather than multiple voices, and although I have never felt reading a Picoult novel that the story isn't being told well, I definitely felt like this story was told much better because of the view towards the characters. Each character had their biases and priorities, but the information was conveyed in such a way that they were somewhat equal. I really loved that.
  • (2/5)
    A very good premise for a story and suspenseful to the end. However, the writing was too descriptive when not neccessary (slowing down the flow), the characters did not grab me into their world (not 3 dimesional enough) and the neatly tied up ending was over the top sweet (although the twist at the end was intriguing).
  • (3/5)
    This is a story of a missing child and an adoptive mother's love and determination to find Timothy no matter what. It is a bit repetitive in the fact that much of the book isseems to be the internal dialogue of mom. It was an interesting twist using the missing child milk carton flyer image as part of the story line. There was a high degree of emotional tension portrayed, but at times it lost its effectiveness. Still this story is a reminder to us all that those children we see listed and shown as missing are someones beloved child and deserve our attention. I give the book a 3 star rating.
  • (5/5)
    What would you do if you saw a Missing Child's photo that looked just like your child? Would you dig into the past, or would you throw the photo away?

    When Ellen receives a Missing Person's Flyer in the mail, she is stunned to see her adopted son Will's face looking back at her. As she tries to investigate the past, she quickly learns that something isn't right, when people start ending up dead...

    When her truest fears are revealed, Ellen and Will's lives are rocked when he is snatched away to be returned to his father...only the mystery doesn't end there...

    This book is very much like the book, Mothers and Other Liars...
  • (4/5)
    Good mystery.
  • (4/5)
    This book is a real page-turner. You immediately get to like the characters, especially the main character. The chapters are short and manageable, as well, without actually skimping on the story or making it seem shorter than it is, which is great. The chapter length, tone of the story, and the immediately-likable characters reminded me a bit of Mary Higgins Clark's books.

    The story line surrounding the main character and her son seems convoluted and, I will admit, at the same time is highly predictable. However, there are definitely some twists along the way that I was not expecting, and the climax of the book really surprised me with some of the choices Scottoline made in the execution of it.

    There is a romance in the book, though it is pretty downplayed (which I really liked). There are a few places where Scottoline seems to focus on the romance, however, that really just sort of seemed unnecessary and out of place to me. It just felt a bit shoved in. But, I think it's fairly easy to see why she chose to do it that way, and really I only noticed two scenes, and only one for absolute certain, where this is the case. And how this romance is dealt with at work is never really mentioned. I think that ends up being the one and only loose end that didn't get answered for us to make a totally nice bow. But, since that wasn't at all the focus or point of the book, but rather just a side note if you ask me, I think it's forgivable and easily overlooked.

    I would definitely read this book again, and I would totally recommend it for others. But, beware...there are some areas toward the end that will require you to have your tissue box handy! Even if you aren't a parent, Scottoline easily manages to convey the deep emotions that are necessary for those scenes regardless. Definitely worth a read!
  • (5/5)
    Wonderful, suspenseful book. Lisa grabs your attention from the beginning by having you love her adopted son and their life. The things that happen afterwards leave you wanting to turn the page to find out what happens.
  • (4/5)
    enjoyable fast read
  • (4/5)
    Sometimes I just want a book that I can fly through. This is one of those books.I picked it up on a monday and was done tuesday night. This is really unusual for me because at best it usually takes me 4-5 days to read a book these days. The plot moved fast - and the chapters were super short. I think short chapters are a really great way of making a story move. I am always fond of short chaptered books. The writing was fine although she does employ one of my least favorite devices - the old fashioned cliff-hanger of a last sentence in a chapter... "At her front door was the last person she ever expected to see" in another chapter we were left wondering who is on the phone, etc etc. This kind of thing always reminds me of those old fashioned silly cliff hangers they used to have before movies where the damsel in distress was left tied up on the train tracks. It makes me feel annoyed to be manipulated in such an obvious way and I am always surprised when anyone does it in modern literature.Anyway - pushing that issue aside - this was the first book by Lisa Scottoline I have read and I did enjoy it - I think I will read more... I loved the way she wove the pet cat right into the story just as a pet would be a big part of a person's life. Recommended for an airplane trip, beach trip or when you just want a fast page turner.
  • (3/5)
    Mediocre book until towards the end, then it picks up.
  • (3/5)
    interesting idea for a plot. really wanted to read it after reading the back. But I found the writing to be choppy and the author gave too many clues too early making it predictable.
  • (4/5)
    from Dan at work; Excellent story. What would you do, if your adopted son looked EXACTLY like a missing child photo on a post card? And since you're an investigative reporter, you investigate, with almost deadly consequences. Lots of twists and turns and surprises in this book.
  • (3/5)
    I can't quite give this one 4 look because I reserve that for the books that I think of long after the last page; but, I have to tell you, I could not put this one down!

    Ellen is a very likable character, and she is right-on with what a mother would do. Her co-worker Sarah plays the witch that we all know, but turns out to be perhaps a little more than meets the eye. The story with her father and boss top it all off nicely. As is common with Scottoline books, there is a marvelous twist at the end, a very satisfying conclusion, and when you read the last page, there is a breath of relief that all is well in the world you've just visited.

    On a side note, I bought this book at a Friends of the Library book store, and it turns out to be signed by the author! Bonus!!

    Recommended
  • (2/5)
    Did not like the writing.
  • (3/5)
    While the story is somewhat predictable it does have some interesting twists. The romance is somewhat extraneous and I could have done without that. The ending is less than thrilling. If you like mysteries it's okay. Be prepared for a little corniness and somewhat unrealistic behavior by some of the characters.
  • (4/5)
    Ellen Gleason almost throws away the flier "Have you seen this child?" until she looks at it agian. She doen not want to acknowlege that it looks suspiciously like her adpoted son Will. She is a journalist and cannot stop herself from thinking about the picture until she discovers the truth.
  • (3/5)
    Ellen Gleeson is a newspaper reporter in Philadelphia and the single mother of an adopted son. On page one of Look Again Ellen glances at a have-you-seen-this-child flyer and both her reporter's and her maternal instincts are set to jangling: the child on the flyer looks exactly like her son. She obsesses over the coincidence, begins investigating the missing boy, and can't stop even when her job is placed in jeopardy.Lisa Scottoline is a former litigator in Phildadelphia, and the author of fifteen previous novels. She writes a good story; the action moves at a brisk clip, the heroine is likably dogged in her quest and reasonably intelligent, there's a drop-dead gorgeous love interest, and every thing's tied up nicely at the end (after a satisfying number of twists and turns, natch). Scottoline's writing is a bit breathless (knocks come suddenly, eyes flash, and the chapters are short and choppy, frequently ending on mini cliffhangers); still, the thrill is there and it moves so fast the stylistic foibles are easy to forgive.
  • (2/5)
    Only read eight chapters, but couldn't finish. I didn't like their,itself an adopted child possibly being returned to the birthparents ( I didn't finish so I don know how it ended).

    That's the storyline but I couldn't read it.
  • (2/5)
    Scottoline does a good job navigating the legal, ethical and moral journey of the story's premise but beyond that, there really wasn’t a whole lot for me to love, or even like about this one. The writing is rather light-weight, more suited for a ChickLit or contemporary romance novel than a gut-wrenching thriller as this one is billed to be. Ellen as a character was impossible for me to accept. When she isn't day-dreaming about being romantically linked to Marcelo (her immediate supervisor at the newspaper) or engaging in some passive-aggressive office battles with her fellow journalist Sarah, Ellen is off throwing caution (and her job) to the wind when she decides that "she" needs to find out for herself Will's true lineage and embarks on a solo investigation to the point where she engages in behaviour akin to stalking and at some points in the story, comes across as a bit unhinged, and not in a very realistic way. I get that Scottoline is a single parent and may view things from a perspective different than mine (I am not a parent), but I found it very disturbing how focused the messaging is on mothers and how Ellen communicates that a mother's love is different, regardless of whether the mother is the birth mother. The story downplays male roles in general and IMO really takes a bit of a swipe at relegating the father to a secondary role as a parent and care-giver, which I found disturbing. I expected the story to have a bit more objectivity to it and not have such a "blinders on" female focus. It doesn't help that some of the dialogue was a weird mixed-bag of 40-something/20-something lingo and didn't always flow like a normal conversation would. There are also some continuity and just general common sense issues that if this had been a movie, would have driven me crazy. Overall, this story probably works for readers who like their action-packed thrillers to be of the soap opera/romance beach read variety. This was my first Scottoline read and while her stories may appeal to some readers (as some glowing reviews tend to suggest), I will be passing on her other books as not my type of read.
  • (4/5)
    One of Lisa's best works thus far (loved the audio as narrator was excellent)! When reporter Ellen receives a “Have You Seen This Child?” flyer in the mail, she starts worrying it looks like her adopted son and she starts her investigation which takes her to Miami to follow the birth parents...she has to know and does her own digging. However, there is more to the story of how he was kidnapped and uncovers the truth--risks losing her own life and her son. Some great twists and turns you will not expect!
  • (3/5)
    Easy read. Fast paced. Slightly better than many beach book mysteries. Enjoyed it.
  • (3/5)
    There was a certain amount of that feeling you get in dumb horror movies: you want to yell out "don't do it" to the character who seems intent on causing trouble for herself. I found that aspect a bit off-putting. Predictable end, even for me, and I really never "see it coming" when I'm reading. The saving characteristic was the moral/ethical dilemma that was really gripping: what would you do if you saw a picture of your adopted child on a missing children card? I think that aspect would have been more real without the neatly tied-up ending.
  • (3/5)
    This book was weird at first because I didn't think it started off that well. She used description in the wrong way, bogging down her sentences and what she was trying to get across. After the first few chapters though, things went much more smoothly. Other than the general predictability of the book, I thought it was pretty good and very thought provoking. The general summary is that Ellen Gleeson, a beautiful reporter is content with her life. She has a job, a son and a hot boss, but when she recieves a HAVE YOU SEEN THIS CHILD? card in the mail that looks eerily similiar to her son, things start to get a little complicated. Because Ellen is a reporter she has a curious nature about her, and she stops at nothing to find out the truth about the little boy on the back of the card until she realizes she may not want to know anymore. It wasn't the plot or the characters that kept me reading, it was the one single thought of "what would I do if I adopted a child that really wasn't supposed to be up for adoption?" Scottoline does a good job of challenging the reader as to what they would do in the situation. I see a little bit of Jodi Picoult play going on, and there is even the "lawyering" part of the book which is also similar to Jodi Picoult's books. Overall, the book was an enjoyable read, fast and made me think about the topic after I was through reading it.
  • (4/5)
    A frightening thriller facing every parent's nightmare with a twist. One family is missing a son, another one wonders if her adopted son is that missing son. There are many turns that keeps you guessing. It was one of those books not to read at night because you'll end up reading way past your bedtime trying to find out what happens next.
  • (5/5)
    Great book! Nice suspense.
  • (4/5)
    Are you one of those people who looks at the faces in the ads for missing children? I am. So is Ellen Gleeson. Someday maybe I will recognize the face of a child in the neighbourhood and be instrumental in reuniting a child with his/her family. Never would I expect to see the face of my own child staring back at me. Ellen didn't expect it either, but there it was. The boy in the poster looked exactly like her son, Will. The reporter in her wouldn't let Ellen rest until she had explored the possibilities - and what she discovered is the stuff of every mother's nightmares.If you have read any of Lisa Scottoline's other books, you will know that she is eminently readable. Her style includes a lot of dialog and short chapters. I read the book in one sitting. Partly because of the writing and partly because I got so caught up in the mystery. There were lots of twists and turns, lots of roadblocks to get through and just when you think you've got it solved ... well, you don't.The ending bothered me a little just because I am not a fan of pat endings. On the other hand I was pleased with Ellen's generosity and heart at the end and all through the book. Just an excellent read.
  • (4/5)
    A quick read, with JamesPatterson-esque chapters, full of moral delimma and heart-wrenching drama. Entertaining and interesting story idea of "What would you do if you saw your adpoted child on a Have You Seen This Child ad?"
  • (4/5)
    A mystery without gore. Very little violence. A good read!