Trova il tuo prossimo audiolibro preferito

Abbonati oggi e ascolta gratis per 30 giorni
How Much is a Million?

How Much is a Million?


How Much is a Million?

valutazioni:
4/5 (19 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
5 minuti
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1985
ISBN:
9780545258159
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

With the help of Marvelosissimo the Mathematical Magician and Steven Kellogg, the concepts of a million, a billion and a trillion are not so quite so intimidating.

Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1985
ISBN:
9780545258159
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

David M. Schwartz spends much of his time finding unusual, whimsical ways to make math and science come alive for kids and teachers, both through his writing, and through speaking at schools and conferences. He's written over 50 books.

Correlato a How Much is a Million?

Audiolibri correlati

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di How Much is a Million?

4.0
19 valutazioni / 28 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    This is a charming book that I loved reading to my students! It always garnered a lot of "Whoa"s! Cute, colorful photographs help illustrate the vastness of numbers and math.
  • (4/5)
    I liked the way this book lays out comparing large numbers for kids. Some of the information I didn't even know! It really puts large numbers in perspective for kids, which in my opinion, is the first major step in learning and grasping an understanding of large numbers. The illustrations reminded me of Magic School Bus (a book I love!). Definitely a great book to read to kids learning larger numbers, but the easiness of the words within the book can be read to all ages.
  • (3/5)
    This book illustrates just how big of a number a million is using interesting illustrations with characters familiar to this series of books.This book starts out strong trying to make the abstract number of a million concrete for young learners. It loses track however when it compares the abstract concept of a million with the abstract concept of the distance to the moon and Saturn. Young learners who cannot grasp a million will gain no understanding by having it compared to other things that they have no grasp of. This would be a great book to have in the classroom and use the beginning of it to try to illustrate the concept of a million to young learners. I would not go past the first few pages though. It would also be great to have on hand for independent reading time for learners to grasp their own understanding in their own time.
  • (4/5)
    Review: This book is a good example of non-fiction because it gives facts and information. It helps students understand the value of one million by providing real-life examples that help put the large number into perspective.Level: Primary, Intermediate
  • (4/5)
    how much is a million is a good book for learning ho to compare things. the author took time to even include an explaination of each of his calculations in the back. this book has cute pictures of kids doing things that would add up to a million. he uses an example of gold fish needing a tank big enough to hold a whale to hold a billion gold fish. it very fun to read because it answers some questions that i knoe all kids share. the book would be great for a multiplacation lesson in 10's. maybe seeing how many years it would take for a person to count in 10's as used in the back of the book.
  • (4/5)
    How Much Is a Million? is a great book for explaining big numbers. It shows how big the numbers are. For example, it showed it would take someone 23 days to count to a million and 95 years to count to a trillion, and that's without taking a break and counting pretty fast. Or, a bowl would have to be as big as a stadium to fit a trillion goldfish! And, if a trillion kids stood on each other's shoulders, they would almost reach Saturn's rings.It has awesome illustrations because it was done by one of the greatest illustrators, Steven Kellogg. The illustrations are cartoony, but really good. The reason that I cannot explain these pictures is that my mom can't accept that some things just are what they are, even when they are. These illustrations are colorful and detailific. Looking at the size of the stadium goldfish bowl in the illustration really helped my understanding of how much space a trillion goldfish would take.I recommend this book to people who want to learn about big numbers like a million, a billion, and a trillion.
  • (4/5)
    This is a great example of informational text. The story itself is informational but then there are deeper explanations in the back about each "if a million..." statements. It gives a very concrete showing of how much a million would be.
  • (4/5)
    Marvelosissimo the Mathematical Magician talks about the enormity of millions, billions, and trillions. The characters are all human, with children who represent the age of the readers. There is not much of a setting or theme, though it does address a child's natural curiosity of the unknown. The style is very simple, and the illustrations are a wonderful display of the text and ideas expressed. This is a very enjoyable and educational book, and I would include it in my collection.
  • (3/5)
    This book looks at how a million, billion, and trillion would stack up in four ways: kids standing up on one another's shoulders, pages covered with stars, goldfish in a bowl and time it would take to count that high. It gives both an idea of the vastness of these numbers and how they increase exponentially.
  • (3/5)
    This silly picture book is a great way to show kids just how much big numbers can actually be. At young ages, many kids can't imagine numbers bigger than 100, but to their surprise, they are quite real and hopefully them understanding that will help make their transitions into those numbers quite a bit easier. This is a great book for younger ages and maybe even the lessons that start introducing the larger numbers.
  • (4/5)
    While keeping to facts and exploring mathematical concepts, the illustrations of this book will make the reader feel like they are enjoying the adventure of a work of fiction. Great as a math block read aloud when talking about large number or place value.Media: ink and wash
  • (4/5)
    Love the different ways to make a million.
  • (3/5)
    This informative books explains what it takes to make one million, one billion, and one trillion. For example, how far a tower of stacked children would reach, or how big a fish tank would need to be if there were going to be one million fish in it. It gives examples for the rest of the numbers as well. There is no story line, but the illustrations make the book worth reading. I would use this in my classroom to give my students an idea of how big those numbers were. I want them to understand the purpose of all of the zeroes at the ends of numbers and I think this book is a great way to give them visuals.
  • (3/5)
    This book helps children count beyond a thousand.
  • (3/5)
    This book helps young readers understand bigger numbers more visually. They can see how much a million actually is. I myself never would have thought it would take 23 days to count to a billion. He uses many different examples using gold fish and people which I think children would love. It says that if you were to stack a billion people on top of each other, it would lead into space! All the way to different planets. This will get students interested and make them want to learn more. Also, like I said it shows them just how big these numbers really are.
  • (4/5)
    I liked the book How Much is a Million? for several reasons. First, it is an informational text to teach children number sense. This book compares how much a million or a billion is to relatable topics. For example, "If one million kids climbed onto one another's shoulders, they would be taller than the tallest buildings, higher than the highest mountains, and farther up than airplanes can fly." This can help students really visualize how large the number 1 million is. Second, this nonfiction piece is engaging for young readers and organized in a clear way with accurate representations. With the help of a magician, the author creates visual pictures and illustrations to help readers conceptualize these large numbers in an interesting way. Finally, this book can really help with the growing problem of innumeracy. This book is accessible and engaging for many students, and is a must for my classroom! The big idea of this book is to help students have a better understanding of number sense.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this book. It is written for younger kids, however I enjoyed reading this because it does an amazing job relating incredibly large numbers to real life items. For example, how large would a goldfish bowl have to be to fit a billion goldfish in? It then explains that the bowl would be as large as a stadium. Sometimes we know that million, billion and trillion are large numbers. However, do we actually know how large they are? This book does an excellent job in doing this.
  • (4/5)
    Schwartz's humorous story helps children conceptualize how really, really big a million, a billion and a trillion are. The illustrations are very colorful and detailed, and have plenty of amusing characters that children will enjoy looking at. The book shows children sitting down to count to a billion--and finishing 95 years later, as well as a billion children climbing on each other's shoulders and standing up past the moon. It uses examples children can imagine, like goldfish and counting and other children, to help them see how those compare to bigger and bigger things. It even asks at the end, "How much is a zillion?"
  • (4/5)
    Making the comparisons of how much a million really is can grab the attention of so many young kids as I could see their eyes opening wide when reading some of the information. I think the comparison for a million was great, billion was okay, but taking it to trillion was a bit much.
  • (4/5)
    This is a really cool book that came up with creative, interesting ways to not only show you how big a million, billion, and trillion are, but to show just how much larger a billion is than a million, and a trillion is than a billion.Very, very cool.
  • (5/5)
    The author find creative ways to help kids get the concepts of numbers, and count to a million. The illustrations are amazing, and the book is very delightful. A great introduction to math as it explains how to visualize a number that big.
  • (5/5)
    This is one of my favorite math books. It does a great job of giving students a better understanding of just how big very large numbers are, through using multiple humorous examples. The illustrations of these examples will get kids excited to learn about more complex math. My favorite example was comparing the size of fish bowl big enough to hold 1 million goldfish as the same size to hold 1 whale.
  • (4/5)
    This is a great text for trying to imagine large numbers. The fact that Steven Kellogg includes his usual brand of detailed, fun illustrations only improves on the experience.
  • (5/5)
    This book focuses on what you would think, how much a million (and other numbers) really is. It gives examples that are easy for students to follow along with. Good especially for younger students.
  • (5/5)
    I liked this book because it allows readers to explore number concepts in a very unique way. Often times we only address how much a hundred or a million looks like in math class, but presenting it in a story format is something not typically done. This allows for a cross between the subjects of reading and math, and that combination could potentially be powerful. The language in the book compares how much a million is to things relatable to children. For example, the author compares one million to tall buildings, high mountains, higher than airplanes, and a fish bowl the size of a whale. The author parallels these comparisons by using detailed illustrations that show these large amounts. One each page, there are paintings of children acting out these amounts who are being directed by a wizard. The wizard acts as the teacher in the plot, but is much more cool and interesting to follow than a classroom teacher. Essentially, the author takes readers out of their classroom and away from white boards and number blocks out to the whole world to serve as a greater ‘manipulative’ for understanding millions, billions, and trillions. The central idea of this book is numbers and using every day things to gain number sense.
  • (5/5)
    How Much Is a Million by David M. Schwartz is a great book about children that have many questions about numbers and how big they are. The pictures in this book matched the author’s words so that students could further visualize difficult concepts. There are many activities that students could do with this book. One activity could be for the teacher to ask the students how high would a tower be if you stacked a hundred blocks on top of one another. Another activity to do with manipulatives is lining a hundred objects up side by side and calculating how long the objects would extend. There are many other activities that you could do with this book. I would defiantly recommend this book to teachers to read to their students because it is a fun way to teach students about numbers and how big they are. I would defiantly read this book to my students because I want to teach my students how important numbers are. I think this book is a wonderful way to get students to conceptualize very large numbers.
  • (4/5)
    If you are not a “math” person (which would include me), How Much Is A Million makes the concepts of large numbers easy to understand. This beautifully illustrated test explains the concepts of million, billion, and trillion in kid-friendly terms: “If you wanted to count from one tone million, it would take you about 23 days.” Also useful to adults would be the note from the author which explains how he arrived at his calculations.
  • (3/5)
    Great book to read when starting to talk about place values, especially a million. I love how this book tried to put a million into perspective for our students.