Trova il tuo prossimo audiolibro preferito

Abbonati oggi e ascolta gratis per 30 giorni
Olivia Forms a Band

Olivia Forms a Band

Scritto da Ian Falconer

Narrato da Dame Edna Everage


Olivia Forms a Band

Scritto da Ian Falconer

Narrato da Dame Edna Everage

valutazioni:
4/5 (34 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
9 minuti
Pubblicato:
Jan 6, 2009
ISBN:
9780743574754
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Everyone's favorite Caldecott Honor-winning porcine diva is back and with fanfare!

There are going to be fireworks tonight, and Olivia can hardly wait to hear the band. But when she finds out that there isn't going to be a band, she can't understand why not. How can there be fireworks without a band?! And so Olivia sets to putting a band together herself...all by herself.

Using pots, pans, her brother's toys, and even her father's suspenders, Olivia forms a band spectacular enough to startle any audience.

Lavishly brought to life in Ian Falconer's signature style, and introducing an eye-catching shade of blue, here is Olivia doing what Olivia does best — making noise.

A Simon & Schuster audio production.

Pubblicato:
Jan 6, 2009
ISBN:
9780743574754
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore


Correlato a Olivia Forms a Band

Audiolibri correlati

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Olivia Forms a Band

4.0
34 valutazioni / 24 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    That imaginative and willful little pig Olivia returns in this fourth picture-book chronicling her adventures, this time determined to create her own marching band, when her mother informs her that the fireworks they will be seeing that evening won't have musical accompaniment. When her family members don't prove as enthusiastic as she is at the idea of participating, our porcine heroine decides she will have to do it by herself. After all, as Olivia reminds her mother, she alone can sound like five people, so why not form a band...?Like its predecessors, Olivia Forms a Band is a superb picture-book, one that pairs a pitch-perfect narrative about a feisty and creative young girl with lots of energy and not a lot of restraint, with absolutely hilarious illustrations that are as beautiful as they are entertaining. Ian Falconer is at the top of his form here, adeptly capturing the droll expressions on the faces of Olivia and her family in his charcoal and gouache artwork. A number of photographs - a rock band, a marching band, the Supreme Court! - are worked into the artwork, in the thought bubbles. Highly recommended to anyone who has read and enjoyed other stories about Olivia, as well as to anyone looking for stories about feisty young girls and their imaginary inner worlds.
  • (5/5)
    Olivia wants to be a one-girl band for the fireworks show she is attending with her family. She gathers up all sorts of instruments, steals her dad's suspenders (while he's wearing them!) and practices (sort of). When it comes time to go to the fireworks show, she changes her mind. That night, Olivia dreams of becoming a member of the Supreme Court. Although only my second book in the series, I really think these books are adorable. Great to read for all ages and the illustrations are really well done!
  • (4/5)
    Olivia and her family are going to watch fireworks on the 4th of July. She decides she needs to form a band to play during the fireworks. After a whole day of practicing she doesn't bring her band to watch the fireworks. I love this book for students because this series is so funny and makes you feel good while you read it. This would be good for a unit containing American Independence or anything to do with 4th of July, or can be put with a fun music lesson or project.
  • (5/5)
    My favorite Olivia book so far. Olivia says the best things in this book and has the cutest snarliest responses. I would not use this book as a lesson, but I would definitely read this book for fun to my children, just to bring the mood up, especially, when Olivia's mother "meets" her "band."
  • (4/5)
    Olivia's family is planning to view fireworks one evening. She is convinced that there should be a band for the fireworks, so she creates a band all by herself.
  • (3/5)
    Another Olivia book. This time Olivia is determined to form a one-man band for the 4th of July. Olivia is less all over the map in this book and it's less new and fun which might be why I like it a lot less than the first one. But it's still cute and kids who liked the first one will still probably like it. I see it possibly in the classroom as just another picture book to have around. Maybe it could connect to a unit about music.
  • (2/5)
    Olivia is frustrated when no one else will join her band for the family's picnic to see fireworks. Inventive as always, she creates her own one-person band. When it's time for the picnic, she decided she doesn't want to take the band, and the family enjoys the display of fireworks. Naturally, Olivia forgets to clean up, and her mom makes a lot of noise running into all of the instruments as Olivia sleeps.
  • (2/5)
    Olivia the pig is the main character of this book. The book begins by Olivia wanting to create her own band because she believes that a firework show needs music. She puts together her own instrument that she can play on her own. She eventually gets bored with it and decides to put on make-up when she leaves for fireworks. Her mom gets mad. They then go and watch the fireworks and they come back home and when they do she doesn't put her toys away like she was supposed to and instead heads straight to bed.Media: Charcoal and gouache on paper
  • (4/5)
    Spunky little Oliva the pig insists that you can't watch fireworks without a band. When her family does not want to be part of the band, Olivia becomes a band of one, collecting instruments from all over the house. However, on the day of the fireworks, Olivia changes her mind and decides not to play. Her band instruments stay in her room, where, of course, she forgets to put them away.
  • (5/5)
    Olivia the pig is back at it again--preparing her band for the Fourth of July fireworks show on the beach. Ian Falconer is a genius at creating the doings and desires of a stubborn and strong-willed little girl in Olivia. Fantastic illustrations and photo-collage portray the energy and independence of this amazing pig!
  • (5/5)
    I enjoyed this Olivia book, and so does my daughter. It's interesting with good pictures, and my daughter enjoys the idea of sounding like more than one person. The author definitely knows family dynamics (for instance, all of the kids going to the bathroom as soon as they get there), and he's good at writing it in an amusing way.
  • (4/5)
    Olivia forms a band is a classic Falconer book. Olivia is upset when she finds out that there will be no band to play when the fireworks go off. So she sets off on a mission to forma band. The only problem is it is just her. You go on an Olivia journey of forming a band and what happens when you do not sound like one.As a student this book is very fun and light. I like how Olivia is so innocent and has no idea what it takes to make a band, but tries anyways. The illustrations add so much to the book.As a teacher this book is great to use with little or struggling readers. It has the comedy to keep you interested and the language and grammar to help them learn to read. Get book.
  • (5/5)
    Grades 2-4. Kids will love this book cause their imaginations and things they create come alive in this book. Creativity is the object of this book.
  • (4/5)
    This isn't as good as Olivia's other outings, but Falconer can't help but have moments of brilliance in all his books. Here it's when Olivia suggests forming a band on one page and her family uniformly disengages eye contact on the next. Delightful, as always.
  • (4/5)
    Olivia the porcine diva is dreaming big again. When her mother announces that the family is going to see fireworks that evening, Olivia insists that fireworks without a band is just not kosher. Recruiting her family is met with worried here-we-go-again looks, but Olivia is not deterred. My favorite line from Olivia comes after Olivia's mother tells her a band has to sound like more than one person: "This morning you told me I sounded like five people!" (Echoing similar refrains in our house.)My daughter's favorite page was the one with the fireworks (['faɪəʃʊks] in her idiolect), which she still remembers from the 4th of July.One thing that pleased me was to see Olivia being considerate of her siblings in piecing together her one-pig band (although she appears to snatch her father's suspenders without asking), giving them something they want in exchange for their toy musical instruments.As with the other Olivia books, Falconer's palette is spare black-and-white, punctuated with splashes of red and blue. The expressions on his characters' faces are so masterful that they tell at least as much of the story as does the prose.A couple quibbles I have are the ever-present baby bottle (with no adult nearby) and the non-sequitur final page with its depiction of what Olivia's dreaming (I suspect it was put there to give adults a chuckle as I can't imagine the vast majority of the book's target audience would recognize it - my daughter wanted to know who those people were), but overall I found it as charming as my girl did.
  • (2/5)
    Sorry, I just don't see the appeal. I mean, I think back when my sons were little, and of course there were times when they behaved & believed in a similar manner - but that scrap of resonance would not have persuaded us to keep reading of Olivia's adventures.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely love the Olivia book series! The pictures are always witty and fit well with the story plot. The story line is great and always leaves me laughing. I love reading this book to my three year olds at the daycare I work at. They always request the Olivia books.
  • (5/5)
    This is my favorite Olivia book so far--the part where Olivia puts on lipstick and then preens in the mirror cracks me and my 5-year-old up every single time. I absolutely LOVE it!!!
  • (2/5)
    I had mixed feelings about this book after reading it. I liked the book because the illustrations were fascinating and engaging. I also liked how this book might be used to introduce different concepts in a music class. But I didn’t like how this was one of the only relevant uses for the book. The book didn’t seem to have a big idea or message except for maybe to follow through with your goals (although Olivia prepared her band, she didn’t end up playing). I was a little confused as to what the main message might be. I don’t think that this book pushes the reader to think about tough issues. I didn’t like the plot of this book because it wasn’t organized or paced well. The entire story line seemed to be disjointed without a true resolution.
  • (4/5)
    This is another cute Olivia story about her forming a band. It would be good to read to children when they are learning about instruments. I like how Ian Falconer incorporated real pictures into his illustrations.
  • (3/5)
    Caldecott Honor winner Ian Falconer returns to his beloved muse Olivia in Olivia Forms a Band. In this book the reader finds Olivia’s family--which has expanded to add another baby brother, William--preparing to have a picnic and view some fireworks. Olivia is naturally excited, but when she discovers that there will not be a band to accompany the display, she decides to correct the problem. Initially she suggests that the family become a band, but when they balk at the idea, she decides to take on the task of providing musical entertainment alone. Her innovation is delightful and would doubtlessly make Dick Van Dyke’s character from Mary Poppins proud.While Olivia is just as lovable as she was in Falconer’s previous titles, this book is not quite as successful as its predecessors. Falconer’s dedication to honestly portraying a child of Olivia’s age and all the forgetfulness and distractions to which they are prone is admirable, but in this book it makes for uneven storytelling. A diversion involving Olivia and her mother’s makeup disrupts the flow of the story and proves to be unnecessary to the tale as a whole. Fans of Olivia will be happy to add this to their collection regardless, and those fan’s parents will appreciate Falconer’s insight into the ins and outs of raising young children.
  • (3/5)
    Olivia is ambitious. No doubt about that. She decides to create a band for the fireworks show. So, she works hard to gather everything she needs for this band. She finds a whistle, pot lids, and a drum. Her band sure is loud. But this goes to show kids that whatever they dream can be a reality. That’s why I enjoy Olivia, no dream is too big. We are shown that on the last page when Olivia is sitting with the Supreme Court Justices. Details: This book was written to interest children in grades K-3 and is on a 2.3 reading level.
  • (4/5)
    Olivia is an outspoken rambunctious pig. When her mother tells her that they are going to watch some fireworks Olivia decides that their needs to be a band at the show. So all by herself she became a one pig band. But that idea was forgotten by the time they were leaving and her band was left on the floor for her mother to trip over.
  • (4/5)
    Olivia the porcine diva is dreaming big again. When her mother announces that the family is going to see fireworks that evening, Olivia insists that fireworks without a band is just not kosher. Recruiting her family is met with worried here-we-go-again looks, but Olivia is not deterred. My favorite line from Olivia comes after Olivia's mother tells her a band has to sound like more than one person: "This morning you told me I sounded like five people!" (Echoing similar refrains in our house.)My daughter's favorite page was the one with the fireworks (['fa????ks] in her idiolect), which she still remembers from the 4th of July.One thing that pleased me was to see Olivia being considerate of her siblings in piecing together her one-pig band (although she appears to snatch her father's suspenders without asking), giving them something they want in exchange for their toy musical instruments.As with the other Olivia books, Falconer's palette is spare black-and-white, punctuated with splashes of red and blue. The expressions on his characters' faces are so masterful that they tell at least as much of the story as does the prose.A couple quibbles I have are the ever-present baby bottle (with no adult nearby) and the non-sequitur final page with its depiction of what Olivia's dreaming (I suspect it was put there to give adults a chuckle as I can't imagine the vast majority of the book's target audience would recognize it - my daughter wanted to know who those people were), but overall I found it as charming as my girl did.