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She's Come Undone

She's Come Undone

Scritto da Wally Lamb

Narrato da Kathy Najimy


She's Come Undone

Scritto da Wally Lamb

Narrato da Kathy Najimy

valutazioni:
3.5/5 (117 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
5 ore
Pubblicato:
Mar 1, 1997
ISBN:
9780743519410
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

"Mine is a story of craving: an unreliable account of lusts and troubles that began, somehow, in 1956 on the day our free television was delivered...."

Meet Dolores Price. She's 13, wise-mouthed but wounded, having bid her childhood goodbye. Beached like a whale in front of her bedroom TV, she spends the next few years nourishing herself with the Mallomars, potato chips, and Pepsi her anxious mother supplies. When she finally rolls into young womanhood at 257 pounds, Dolores is no stronger and life is no kinder. But this time she's determined to rise to the occasion and give herself one more chance before really going belly-up.

In this extraordinary coming-of-age odyssey, Wally Lamb invites us to hitch a wild ride on a journey of love, pain, renewal with the most heartbreakingly comical heroine to come along in years. At once a fragile girl and a hard-edged cynic, so tough to love yet so inimitably lovable, Dolores is as poignantly real as our own imperfections. She's Come Undone includes a promise: you will never forget Dolores Price.

Pubblicato:
Mar 1, 1997
ISBN:
9780743519410
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Wally Lamb is the author of five New York Times bestselling novels: She’s Come Undone, I Know This Much Is True, The Hour I First Believed, Wishin’ and Hopin’, and We Are Water. His first two works of fiction, She’s Come Undone and I Know This Much Is True, were both #1 New York Times bestsellers and selections of Oprah’s Book Club. Lamb edited Couldn’t Keep It to Myself, I’ll Fly Away, and You Don’t Know Me, three volumes of essays from students in his writing workshop at York Correctional Institution, a women’s prison in Connecticut, where he has been a volunteer facilitator for two decades. He lives in Connecticut and New York.


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Cosa pensano gli utenti di She's Come Undone

3.7
117 valutazioni / 123 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    At times I cared about Dolores and didn't want to stop reading. However, when the life-altering events happened (and there were many of them), I found the writing awkward and I disconnected from the novel. I was hoping for a great ending, but was disappointed. The novel was just okay - not great, but not awful.
  • (4/5)
    Delores' character is lovable and annoying at times. She's just like a real human, isn't she? :PBut anyways, really, there were some parts of the book where I'm just like "REALLY????" flabbergasted, and other times I was just like "Yes girl, take the higher road!" and just wanted to be like her in instances. Overall, it's a wonderful book that really gets you thinking about YOU at times because you reflect so much after.
  • (4/5)
    Dark and disturbing but in its own way quite brilliant. It's been a long time since I read it, but my memory is that it left me with a similar feeling to Janet Fitch's work, somewhere in between Paint It Black (which was beautiful and dark but somehow not as good as her first) and White Oleander (which blew me away and remains one of my favorite books of all time).
  • (5/5)
    I liked this book. A lot of the scenarios are a little over the top, but then again, I like that sort of thing which is why I prefer fiction books over non-fiction. I did like Lamb's other novel better though-- I Know This Much is True.
  • (3/5)
    I didn't love it. At times, I hated Dolores. At times, I was Dolores. This is definitely one of those books I wish goodreads did half stars for because I'm torn between a 3 or 4 star rating. There were some beautiful moments though and those are the parts that stand out and make me lean closer to a 4. I'll probably change my rating once I sit down to review.
  • (5/5)
    I liked this book. A lot of the scenarios are a little over the top, but then again, I like that sort of thing which is why I prefer fiction books over non-fiction. I did like Lamb's other novel better though-- I Know This Much is True.
  • (5/5)
    Warning! She's Come Undone by Wally Lamb will not let go of you until you finish the book. I have had this book on my shelf for a long time but decided to tackle it recently. My copy is 465 pages and not in big print but with dark ink, thank goodness.I have been reading books lately that have a common theme, obesity and dysfunctional families. Since I have always had a weight problem since I was twelve I am holding onto the main character, Dolores Price's tip to imagining mold on the food that you want to avoid. There is much more to this tornado of a book, starting when Dolores was only five years old when her father deserted his family, through having a mother dealing with mental illness. and only finding love through the consumption of food. If things got really bad, she would eat as fast as she could, trying to numb herself against a life that she could barely survive. She learns to protect herself with bad language and take outrageous revenge to even with people as she gets older. She has periods of understanding why she does things.What really amazes me is how Wally Lamb could write this book full of female problems without being female himself. Also he gets it so right with how people who are obese feel about themselves and also what it is like having a mother who is mentally ill and then also what the depths of depression is like. I had great difficulty in putting this book down and I am very impressed with his convincing writing. At times I wanted to tell Delores, " No, stop and think about this first before you do it but she didn't listen to me!I highly recommend this very emotional coming of age journey to everyone.
  • (3/5)
    I have strong feelings about this book I just don't know what they are. I'm honestly kind of speechless. I think it was great? Hell, what happened? What did I read? How do you describe such a complex and... uncomplicated book? It's a coming of age story, an awakening, an odyssey of emotional and mental health. It's all over the place. It all centers around Dolores Price, a young girl who isn't the most emotionally stable. She starts off as a fragile little thing and balloons up into a fat, depressed cynic, and then spends the rest of her life roller coasting around until she finds some sort of balance. It's a discussion of women's rights, religion, mental health, family dynamics, romantic relationships, and more. She is a complex, intriguing heroine/villain/comedic actress. Honestly I can't describe this book and do it justice. It takes a little to get into, but one you do, buckle up.
  • (4/5)
    Good read.
  • (5/5)
    While reading Wally Lamb's She's Come Undone back in the summer of 2003, there were two things that I just couldn't stop thinking about: The Guess Who's classic song, and the Lee Philips-directed film, The Girl Most Likely To (1973).

    A remarkable novel, She's Come Undone is a coming-of-age, heartstrings-tugger about a girl named Delores who grapples with childhood obesity, and the maltreatment she endures from others?including her wayward mother?as the result of it.

    Delores undergoes quite a bit in her life. And I personally loved and felt a great deal of empathy towards her, considering that my own childhood included battling the bulge.
    They all?even her fellow college coeds?mistreat the fat girl, Delores, but all of that begins to change after a distraught and suicidal Delores one day finds herself washed ashore and face-to-face with a beached whale ...

    She's Come Undone is one of the greatest books that I've ever read. And it's no surprise that Ms. Oprah selected it as a must-read for her book club. Five stars.
  • (4/5)
    This story follows the life of Dolores Price, and what a life she has. While she might not be the most likable character, I did find that I wanted things to work out for her. I found the story to be highly entertaining, heart-warming at parts, and loved the ending. There is abuse in this story, so I would recommend this book to people who won't find it triggering.
  • (5/5)
    Awesome! Wally Lamb miraculously pulls this off--a man writing in first person from a woman's point of view. Totally convincing, I wonder how he has such an intimate understanding of the mind of women? I could relate to so much--Delores Price is my hero. I was able to mourn and celebrate some of my own victories and tribulations in the guise of rooting for the protagonist. This is a truly soul-nourishing work of fiction.
  • (1/5)
    Ridiculous. Save your time.
  • (3/5)
    While I liked the narrative voice, part of me was made uncomfortable? felt abandoned? by the decisions the protagonist made and by her almost complete un-self-awareness for the first two-thirds of the book. Maybe it simply reminded me too much of my own adolescence. But I still feel that Lamb gets too much misplaced credit for the emotional inner lives of his characters. While he may understand some of the motivations behind certain behaviors (both rational and irrational) I'm not sure he is as whole-heartedly empathetic as I would want the author writing about these wounded characters to be.
  • (3/5)
    This book is about Dolores Price, from her young years in Rhode Island to adulthood. The story traces her unhappy life as the only child in a dysfunctional family to her adulthood where she finds happiness with Thayer. After suffering the trauma of rape at 13 years of age, she begins her odyssey of self loathing by escaping to her room to eat snack foods and watch Tv and eventually weighs over 250 lbs. After spending years in a psychiatric hospital, she learns to love her new self and she is able to form friendships and relationships with several other characters in the story. Although I found the story compelling at times, I found her hatred and vindictiveness tiresome and still can't understand why she spent over 7 years in care. Does this make sense to you? Her care was paid by her deceased mother's best friend, another nose stretcher. Although it has a happy ending, I don't think I will be reading other titles by Wally Lamb.
  • (2/5)
    This 1992 novel had a lot of attention in the 1990's but I never felt inclined to read it until now. It tells the story of Dolores Price who is a thoroughly messed up person, whose life goes from one crisis to another. Her parents get divorced, she comes to hate her father, she is raped at 13, has a horrible high school time, is forced to go to college, where she is shunned because she is obese, runs away from college, her mother is killed, she ends up in a mental institution, spends years seeing a psychiatrist, maneuvers to meet her old roommate's boyfriend and immediately fornicates with him, has an abortion, marries the boyfriend, comes to be very unhappy with him, they get divorced, she does many stupid things and is a very annoying character. The end is inconclusive and non-definitive. There are few admirable characters in the book and the language is often foul. I could not like the book and I suppose the only good thing about reading it is that now I know what a depressing thing it is.
  • (5/5)
    This book was amazing. Wally Lamb did a great job of writing from a woman's point of view. Even if you dislike the protagonist, you end up rooting for her.
  • (1/5)
    didn't finish it. Protagonist was loathsome.
  • (5/5)
    One of the best books I've ever read in a very long time. As painful as it was to reach much of the early parts of the book (due to the grim realities of this child's life), Dolores becomes a survivor despite herself. Reading the book felt good.
  • (4/5)
    I read the book, I liked the book but I cannot even begin to tell you how annoying and depressing the character of Delores was throughout the book.I mean I just wanted to really, you know, slap the eyebrows off her face. Yes she went through some trying times but the negativity was overwhelming, just too much but really, what more can you expect but gosh...SLAP! ok much better.Wally Lamb is wonderful and deserves to be read. But Delores, she needs to come undone with a big 'ole snap out of it slap.
  • (5/5)
    Our book club chose this book because the cover art and jacket blurbs led us to believe it would be "lighter fare." Even though it wasn't what we expected, we really enjoyed it and were rooting for the heroine.Dolores Price is a pretty pathetic and sad young woman - with good reason! But I liked the writing and had to keep reminding myself it was written by a man. I wish he would write a sequel so we find out what happens to her. I firmly believe Dolores rises above her circumstances in the end.
  • (3/5)
    I read this several years ago, so I'm a little fuzzy on the storyline, but I do remember I liked it. (yeah, that was super helpful.. you're welcome)
  • (5/5)
    Listened to this on CD while driving to Charleston. I was crying so hard, I missed my exit and didn't realize until 30 minutes later! Very touching.
  • (3/5)
    Well, I read this back when it was very popular, and I don't remember liking it very much. This always happens to me--those books that seem so meaningful to other readers fall flat for me. But I do remember thinking that the protagonist was just not a very believable person to me. It's a book that supposed to be for women but didn't seem to "get" women--at least, that's how I remember it.
  • (5/5)
    It's like Mr. Lamb thumbed through my heart's pages before writing this book.
  • (1/5)
    This book was all around insulting. Is this Mr Lamb's idea of the way women act, think and feel? Very disappointing.

    Assuming that he didn't mean to generalise and that very well may be a woman like the main character somewhere in the world, even then the book crossed a line. It was too much, not only everything that could go wrong to her did go wrong but it all happened in an entirely predictable way.

    If you're going to write an unsympathetic main character the story has to make up for it.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book and just like "I Know This Much Is True" - I couldn't put it down. Wally Lamb's weaves a story with very strong characters; his characters always seem so tragic and in so much pain; I am always rooting for them! As a New Englander, I particularly enjoy that his books take place across an area I know very well and can relate to. There aren't many books that transport me but his books definitely do.
  • (5/5)
    Sad, depressing, funny and hopeful all in one. Lots of good one liners to live by... ( thought about how love was always the thing that did that- smashed into you, left you raw. The deeper you loved, the deeper it hurt) ....puttin' rain in my eyes tears in my dreams and rocks in my heart-Billie Holiday. (What might make you happy? asked the professor. " Small thighs" "My boyfriend finding my G spot" "Prince Charming" Allyson hooked her bare feet around the chair in front of her. "Prince Charming locating my G spot between my thin thighs" And of course this one " Our day will come If we just wait awhile...
  • (2/5)
    “If you want your prayers answered, get up off your knees and do something about them.”The central character of this novel is Dolores Price, a 40-year-old woman who recounts her life from an innocent 4 year old in 1956 Connecticut through her painful progress into adulthood to middle age.Dolores, is the sole surviving child of a totally dysfunctional marriage, a younger brother having been strangled by the umbilical cord during birth. Her mother, Bernice, never quite recovers from this loss whilst Dolores's father, Tony, is an occasionally abusive husband and womaniser. As Dolores's childhood progresses, her parents' marriage collapses, her mother has a mental breakdown leading to her being confined to a state hospital, and she is forced move to live with her maternal grandmother, Thelma Holland. Mrs. Holland is a dutiful but generally ineffective guardian who outwardly is unable to offer much comfort to both her daughter and slowly disintegrating granddaughter. When 13 years old Dolores is raped by one of her grandmother's upstairs tenants, then her mother Bernice, is later killed in a freak accident Dolores knows that she can't turn to her grandmother for solace, instead she retreats into binge eating hiding behind a mountain of fat, both of which temporarily protect her from further physical assault.To try to fulfil her dead mother's final wishes Dolores enrols at college. There she becomes the room-mate of Katherine (Kippy) Strednicki, who is only really interested in more superficial concerns. However, Kippy has an apparently saintly boyfriend back home who has rejected her sexual overtures believing that sex before marriage is sinful. When Kippy's boyfriend,Dante Davis, sends Kippy nude photos of himself Dolores intercepts them and keeps them for herself. Dante becomes her obsession.After a failed year at college and following a similarly failed suicide attempt, Dolores spends seven years in a private mental hospital where she recovers both her mental and physical equilibrium. On departure she sets out to find and win Dante. She succeeds in this widely fantastic plan, only to suffer further humiliation at his hands. Throughout everything, Dolores clings to a frail notion of family by writing to her grandmother, lying about her own miserable life whilst expressing affection that are never satisfactorily reciprocated.Throughout the novel I found rooting for Dolores in the hope that she would overcome all her previous adversity and find peace and happiness. In a way she does. In the latter stages of the book the author rather strays into some of the hot social and political topics of the day,namely abortion and infertility, AIDS, Parkinson's and the plight of the whales which is a bit of a shame in what otherwise is an intensely introspective novel. The book's suspense depends more on emotions rather than events, and its hard not sympathize with Dolores. This is a story of survival.Considering that this is Lamb's first novel he writes convincingly in the voice of a female, tracing her life from 4 to 40 (or at least in the opinion of this male reader anyway) and despite the tragic events at times made me smile. Yet somehow it failed to really hit the mark (the dalliance with the the Political issues of the day certainly didn't help) culminating in a relatively low mark. A good effort but no banana.
  • (3/5)
    Never got around to reading this when it first came out 15-17 years ago, but on the recommend of another great reader friend, I picked it up for a road trip and didn't put it down until I finished it,! Whoa - what a roller-coaster ride of a coming-of-age novel. There's definitely no one like Dolores Price, and her troubled young life: her irreverence, her deep longing for a father who abandons both her and her mother; her naiveté about the adults in her life, her struggles to feel like she belonged -anywhere-just like any adolescent girl, her searing trauma of rape at 13 years old, and her desperate attempts to cope with the event is only compounded by the sudden accidental death of her mother. She's only able to break out of her self exile in her grandmother's home, (binge tv watching and eating herself into oblivion) when she gets on a bus and travels to the college her mother and sympathetic high school counselor had worked so hard to get her admitted to, in spite of Dolores' stubborn resistance. The painful struggles she experiences as one of the ten new college freshmen girls in her dorm- to fit in somehow, fat as she is- are sometimes cringe-worthy, but always genuine. After another humiliation by her roommate's intoxicated boyfriend on the dance floor at a college party, hapless Dolores falls into the clutches of yet another lonely, self seeking adult, intent on using her sexually. Ugh -that episode was definitely miserable to read but it does drive Dolores into a rage that leads her to a turning point. Will she destroy herself? She flees her college, and everything, everyone in her life, by embarking on a last ditch trip to Cape Cod, which culminates in her all night "watch" over a beached, dead whale at the shore's edge - a giant black behemoth - and her suicide attempt in the water next to it. This poignant, dreamlike treatment, contrasting her despair, and pain with the underwater ocean images is truly an original passage. The author deserves the kudos he's received for this book for chapters such as this - thankfully, Delores can't quite do herself in, and after she is found and taken to a psych hospital and then halfway house facility, we readers get to cheer her on as she discovers truths about herself, her past, and lose the crippling weight that has literally and figuratively dragged her down. Her determined efforts to drive herself forward into "normal" adulthood, (as Dr. Shaw, her counselor had trained her: "Visualize your solutions! PIcture an answer to your problem. Then make the picture real.") sends her seeking out her roommate's teenage boyfriend (Dante) who she discovers is now a teacher in Montpelier, Vermont. Her romance with the now adult Dante, and their four year marriage is another leg of her growing up journey, and again we can foresee that Dolores' troubles can result in another psychological "crash", but she rights herself, with the help of several colorful characters from her old neighborhood. The loss of her grandmother brings more maturity and perspective to Dolores, and as we zig-zag with her through the early 80s, we know she's beginning to be the person she always could be. With all the great cultural references (rock n roll songs, the supposed death of Paul McCartney- Beatles references, Woodstock, more 70s rock, Watergate, the peace & love movement, the moon walk, the growing tragedy of AIDS) we have another foul mouthed, frustrated, always questioning female Holden Caufield in her own Catcher in the Rye, with a scope and reach that hearkens back to 19th bildungsromans. Dolores' life is a '70s version of other female protagonists as varied as Scout in To Kill a Mockingbird, or Weetzie Bat from Francesca Lia Block's eponymous 1989 y.a. novel but with a wider range of colorful, often eccentric characters, some kind, some bumbling,all a mix of sinster, self serving or ignorant. Sometimes too crass and explicit for my taste (or teen readers!), this book and especially Dolores Price becomes totally real, a woman we always root for, and who experiences (eventually! ) a redemptive present, brilliantly told with humor and razor sharp dialogue and description.