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Voyage of the Dawn Treader

Voyage of the Dawn Treader

Scritto da C. S. Lewis

Narrato da Derek Jacobi


Voyage of the Dawn Treader

Scritto da C. S. Lewis

Narrato da Derek Jacobi

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (232 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
5 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854386
Formato:
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Descrizione

Narnia ... where anything can happen (and most often does) ... and where the adventure begins.

The Dawn Treader is the first ship Narnia has seen in centuries. King Caspian has built it for his first voyage to find the seven lords, good men whom his evil uncle Miraz banished when he usurped the throne. The journey takes Edmund, Lucy, their cousin Eustace, and Caspian to the Eastern Islands, beyond the Silver Sea, toward Aslan's country at the End of the World.

Performed by Derek Jacobi

Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854386
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Informazioni sull'autore

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Out of the Silent Planet, The Great Divorce, The Screwtape Letters, and the universally acknowledged classics The Chronicles of Narnia. To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and have been transformed into three major motion pictures. Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) fue uno de los intelectuales más importantes del siglo veinte y podría decirse que fue el escritor cristiano más influyente de su tiempo. Fue profesor particular de literatura inglesa y miembro de la junta de gobierno en la Universidad Oxford hasta 1954, cuando fue nombrado profesor de literatura medieval y renacentista en la Universidad Cambridge, cargo que desempeñó hasta que se jubiló. Sus contribuciones a la crítica literaria, literatura infantil, literatura fantástica y teología popular le trajeron fama y aclamación a nivel internacional. C. S. Lewis escribió más de treinta libros, lo cual le permitió alcanzar una enorme audiencia, y sus obras aún atraen a miles de nuevos lectores cada año. Sus más distinguidas y populares obras incluyen Las Crónicas de Narnia, Los Cuatro Amores, Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino y Mero Cristianismo.

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (3/5)
    Incredibly imaginative and beautiful. If you are religious, you can enjoy the immense allegory in the series, if not, enjoy it for the marvel that it is. This particular book is a bit awkward at parts, but still good.
  • (5/5)
    Edmund, Lucy, and their insipid cousin Eustace go on a Narnian adventure with King Caspian to find the end of the world (and the border of Aslan’s land). Many adventures ensue. Most enjoyable. :)
  • (4/5)
    The book is more a collection of short stories. It's ideal if you read it as a bed time stories to young children, but sometimes it was difficult for me to return to it.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorites of the Narnia series, I love seeing the development of Eustice. I have read this numerous times.
  • (4/5)
    The fifth book in the Chronicles of Narnia tells the story Edmund and Lucy and their cousin Eustace Scrubb after they get pulled into Narnia through a painting in their aunt's house. The three children accompany Caspian as he goes on a quest to the edge of the sea.I really enjoyed this entry in the series. The story was well done and I enjoyed the anecdotal style (similar in some ways to the first Harry Potter book) where a series of different adventures happen. It's a great quest story and also includes all of the fun elements of a story about a sea voyage. Looking forward to the last two books in the series.
  • (5/5)
    This book read like a great adventure story, more so than Prince Caspian or LWW. It was fun and fantastic.
  • (4/5)
    I only partially liked it in the beginning, expecting a book identical in style to the other Narnia books. But the nearer it approached the End (capitalization intentional), the more I liked it, until finally, at the last page, I knew I loved it.The story, as a tale of exploration, ebbs and flows in a rhythm. It does not have one ultimate climax. It has many little ones throughout the book. You won't find battles or many tense moments. What you will find is a pleasant narrative with many interesting mini-adventures and allegories that will remind you a bit of Aesop's Fables without feeling kiddish or going out of its way to make a point.
  • (5/5)
    This is the THIRD book in the Chronicles of Narnia.This might be my favorite volume of the Chronicles. Something about the sea voyage, exploring new territory, the redemption of Eustace, the End of the World, and learning more about Aslan always appealed to me. Everything is so beautiful - the stars, the birds, the flower-filled lake. I know the religious undertones, and even though I'm not religious, I believe in Aslan.
  • (5/5)
    I still haven't seen the new movie version of Voyage of the Dawn Treader, so this review is strictly on the book, which is a good one. I've been trying to journey through Narnia for several years now. I think I received the set of books when I was around twelve or thirteen. That means I've had them for well over twenty years. I kept reading The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe over and over and over again. I am now making progress. I'm at least keeping up with the movies!Voyage of the Dawn Treader is quite a fun adventure book. We are introduced to Eustace, a spoiled cousin of the Pevensies. Lucy and Edmond go to stay with Eustace and his family one summer and are whisked back into Narnia, with Eustace along for the ride. They are hauled aboard a ship called the Dawn Treader where they find their old friends Caspian, Reepicheep, and others. The ship is sailing to find the seven lost Lords of Narnia. Through their search, they encounter strange islands and odd creatures. This is where the story really gets going. In my opinion this is one of the lighter and more fun books in the series. I thoroughly enjoyed it and I regret that I didn't read it twenty years ago. It could almost be read as a stand-alone book if someone was not familiar with the rest of the series. Voyage of the Dawn Treader is recommended for all ages but there are a few places that might be a little intense. If your kids aren't reading independently at this level, I recommend you read it with them. You'll all enjoy it.
  • (5/5)
    This is a beloved childhood favourite, which I've re-read after seeing the film. Though more faithful than the film adaptation of Prince Caspian, the film still strays from the book. The real story is both more gentle (we are incredibly fond of violence in our popular culture) and stronger... and has a brilliant opening line - "There once was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it". Read it to remember...
  • (5/5)
    This reads a bit like "Gulliver's Travels". Lucy and Edmund are back in Narnia with their cousin, Eustace. They travel with Prince Caspian from island to island, following the faint trail of some Narnian lords who set sail for the end of the world some time back. Along the way Eustace loses his "beastliness" (with the help of a dragon adventure) and various lessons about character are learned. One of the bright stars of this novel is Reepicheep, the brave-hearted Talking Mouse. We're looking forward to the movie!
  • (4/5)
    This is a story about a very big adventure that even has a dragon in it. I recommend this book to people who like the series.
  • (4/5)
    This book by C.S. Lewis continues the Narnia adventures. This time however, it is Edmund and Lucy who go with their cousin, Eustace. They fall into a painting of a ship on an ocean that has the current king of Narnia aboard, Caspian. King Caspian is looking for seven lords who left long ago searching for the end of the world. Edmund, Lucy, and Eustace go along with him on this journey. Eustace is a brat who learns the value of friends and work while on this journey. They get the help of Aslan, the great Lion, during times of great need. The whereabouts of the missing lords are all accounted for, but not all met pleasurable ends. In order to save the last three lords, Caspian must sail to the ends of the ocean and leave one of his crew there. Reepicheep, a valiant mouse, is more than willing, so this is what they do. At the end of the world, Lucy, Edmund, and Eustace also go with Reepicheep so they may re-enter their world. Aslan tells Lucy and Edmund they will not be coming back to Narnia.This is a great literature story that should be read to elementary students so they may appreciate this kind of work. We are going to take some of our elementary students to see this movie before Christmas break and I have encouraged our teachers to read the story before then so they may have discussions and learning activities.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed this tale but felt it had less focus, direction, and meaning than the previous books I have read in this series. It was more a series of little short adventures than an overarching tale with a coherent theme. Enjoyable enough, but not his best, in my opinion.
  • (5/5)
     Classic, great, a must-read. Some volumes are more enjoyable than others though.
  • (4/5)
    I've never read the Narnia series beyond Prince Caspian so I'm having fun going through these. Having recently read some of Lewis's other works, it's fun to compare those with this fantasy series and see the similar themes, language and thought structures.As to the series, Voyage of the Dawn Treader is different from Caspian and Wardrobe in a couple of ways. First, as was indicated at the end of Caspian, only 2 of the Penvensies are on this trip…although they do bring along another Earthling, their cousin. I felt myself missing Peter and Susan at times (and sometimes wishing I could trade out Eustace for one or both of them) but at the same time, I was growing somewhat annoyed at Peter and it was refreshing to have Eustace there and see his growth from whining cynic to helpful adventurer. It was also fun to see two central characters return from the previous novel…having Caspian (now king) and Reepicheep there added to the familiarity and camaraderie of the voyage.Another large change is that both Wardrobe and Caspian had a strong central antagonist in the book with a looming conflict to resolve. In Dawn Treader, there isn't a specific antagonist or a large conflict. Rather, we follow the crew on their quest to sail as far East as they can…beyond the ends of the known world and, if possible, into the "land of Aslan." Along the way they have a variety of adventures, thus encountering minor antagonists and conflicts, but the intensity or added tension created by a central character like the White Witch or the power hungry Miraz. One other change I noticed in this book from the previous ones was that the symbolism in this novel seemed more prevalent and blatant than before. Perhaps part of this is because I was reading some of Lewis's other works and so I was tuned into his allegorical nature. Though, some of the symbolism used felt so over the top and obvious that it struct me as interesting. In Wardrobe, there are definite symbolic elements dealing with Aslan near the end of the book…a generally religious person may overlook these and not think twice. At the very end of Dawn Treader, however, is a section of symbolism (coupled with explanatory dialog) that would be very hard for any Christian to mistake for anything other than the blatant symbol Lewis is presenting. It was almost as if he had talked to people who read the previous novels and "didn't get it" and so he went into Dawn Treader thinking…"I'll beat them over the head with it so they can't miss it." This wasn't bad, per se, it was just a distinction that I thought was odd (and I'm curious as to how this will play out in the movie coming out this winter). That said, there are still some elements that are ripe for symbolism but I'm still wondering exactly what they might signify.Overall, I really enjoyed the story. At points, it reminded me of epic voyage stories like The Odyssey or The Aneid. I really enjoyed the character grown of Eustace. I also really liked the variety islands and adventures encountered. Even the peaceful moments of travel had vibrant and creative elements that were a lot of fun (such as the "sea people" near the end). The dragon encounter was very interesting. The Dark Island was intriguing and I would have liked to know a little more of it. I thought the "Death Water" idea was cool, especially that it became almost a mythical/mystical element due to the Aslan intervention.Like The Odyssey, even though the book had an overarching goal (to reach the utter East), it was presented in such a way that it could easily be broken out into a series of standalone short stories. Like previous books, the writing is fresh and engaging and would easily be enjoyed by a child. At times I wonder about the narrator's role, but in the end, I didn't worry about it much.This is an excellent addition to the Narnia series. A little different in scope from Wardrobe and Caspian, but just as enjoyable in my opinion.****4 out of 5 stars
  • (5/5)
    I wasn't very taken with the first Narnia book I read, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, mostly because the Christian allegory seemed so blatant--but it was also imaginative with some beautiful imagery and striking scenes, and friends told me the Christian allegory is muted in the later books (other than The Last Battle.) I've found that to be so, and have been increasingly charmed by the later Narnia books, The Horse and His Boy and Prince Caspian, with The Voyage of the Dawn Treader my favorite so far.Part of that is because of the character of Eustace, a cousin of Lucy and Edmund who share their adventures in this book. He's so amusing in the beginning in his self-absorbed know-it-all smugness and it's interesting to see his transformation (in more than one sense of the word). Reepicheep, the talking warrior mouse is adorable--like Lucy, I wanted to hug him. And so many scenes and events in this book are vivid and imaginative: the water of gold, the Dark Island, Aslan's Land and the merpeople. Lewis' style either has grown or grown on me, because I see it more in this book as light and humorous rather than twee.I even found the scenes with Aslan in this book a highlight--despite being able to detect the aspects of Christian allegory. This was a great read.
  • (4/5)
    I must say, I really changed my mind about this book...for the better, actually. I'm not sure if it was just that I was distracted while reading the beginning of this book or what, but I had a horrible feeling that it was going to be awful. Besides that, I'm not a big fan of stories about sea-bound adventures. However, I ended up truly enjoying this book. It was wonderful seeing King Caspian and the two Pevensie children, as always. And even Eustace turned out to be a character that I enjoyed! I really loved how they got into so many different adventures...fantastical things that would never happen anywhere else. My favorite adventures were with the Dufflepuds and at the very end of the world. I laughed out loud at the Dufflepuds in some parts, which is very rare for me to do with a book...so you know it's good :) And, I have to say, with the last two books holding battles, it was nice to have a fairly relaxed book. Not that there weren't troubles in this book, it was just that there wasn't so much of the sense of evil, nasty people wanting to take over Narnia.
  • (3/5)
    I struggled a little through this book. I still find the series enchanting but it was hard to get through. Two more to go! I'm a little disappointed that the Pevensies are not all in Narnia.
  • (3/5)
    See review for #2, "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe."
  • (5/5)
    Strongest entry in the series.
  • (4/5)
    Shortly after the events of the novel Price Caspian, Lucy and Edmond find themselves drawn back to Narnia with their intolerable cousin, Eustace. Three years have passed, and Caspian X is still on the throne. Well, he's on a boat when they arrive, but figuratively, he's still on the throne.He has vowed to find the seven Lost Lords, and has embarked on a ship called the Dawn Trader to do it. He,the Pevensies, Eustace Scrubb, and some familiar characters from PC, including everybody's favorite swashbuckling mouse Reepicheep, embark on the journey together, which is rife with peril and replete with adventure.Part of Lewis' Caspian Triad (followed by The Silver Chair), which is further part of the Chronicles of Narnia, this book belongs on the shelf of those who like Lewis' other work, or are looking for family-friendly (though somewhat religiously allegorical) literature to read their kids at night. Recommended for fans of more youth-oriented, religion-inspired, classic fantasy.
  • (4/5)
    it is a bit dragging in the beginning but it gets more exciting as it goes on.
  • (4/5)
    Another epic adventure in the world of Narnia. Much fun to read, although not as 'complete' as the previous two. The grandiosity (the edge of the world, fallen stars...) makes me wonder whether the remaining books will seem mundane.As in Prince Caspian, I enjoyed the occasional drops of dry humor.
  • (5/5)
    The third of The Chronicles of Narnia in the order in which they were published (and, at the moment, my preferred order), The Voyage of the Dawn Treader begins with what may be one of the best opening lines in all of literature: “There was a boy called Eustace Clarence Scrubb, and he almost deserved it.” This Eustace, a very “modern,” “grown-up,” selfish and peevish little bully, happens to be related to our old friends the Pevensies from the previous books. The two youngest children, Edmund and Lucy, are vacationing with the Scrubbs when our story begins. The three of them are drawn together into a painting of a ship in Lucy’s bedroom, and find themselves in Narnia aboard the ship of another old friend—Prince, now King, Caspian—who is on a voyage east to find what became of seven Telmarine lords whom his uncle Miraz sent away year before. But the mouse Reepicheep has a yet greater ambition, to sail to the very end of the world, to Aslan’s country, and meet whatever adventure awaits them there.In nature, this story is episodic, but to bind it together Lewis provides not only a great and glorious quest, but also two of the greatest characters in all of the Chronicles: Eustace, and Reepicheep. Both provide some comic relief near the beginning of the book—Eustace’s journal entries are particularly hilarious, as are his repeated demands to speak to the British consul—but both are characters of such great depth. Reepicheep, like several other characters in Prince Caspian, is a creature of faith. He wants nothing more than to go to Aslan’s country, and none of the dangers and fears along the way can conquer that desire. He is fearless, wise, and brave, even if he is only two feet high! Eustace is, to put it kindly, a beast, but he is so selfish he thinks instead that everyone around him are beasts. Only when he becomes one externally does he realize how greatly he needs help on the interior. I love the subtle and realistic way Lewis treats his reformation:It would be nice, and fairly nearly true, to say that “from that time on Eustace was a different boy.” To be strictly accurate, he began to be a different boy. He had relapses. There were still many days when he could be very tiresome. But most of those I shall not notice. The cure had begun.Actually, all the characters are beautifully drawn. I am amazed at how much Lucy grows as a person in each additional book, and Edmund too. Caspian is more well-rounded here than he was in the last volume, and becomes more so at the end when he is unable to gain what his heart most greatly desires. For him, and for the others, this is a voyage that will change the rest of their lives.Of course, the adventures they encounter are varied and fascinating as well, and only become more beautiful and exciting the further east they go. As a child I was incredibly excited by the episode in which Caspian frees the Lone Islands from tyranny and a brutal slave trade, and today I find I still am. And who can forget Eustace’s experiences on Dragon Island? Or Deathwater Island with its terrible power and beauty? Or the invisible, “uglified,” always-agreeing dufflepuds? (The last was one of my sister’s favorite episodes in the book, and we both laughed many times over lines like “And what I say is, when chaps are visible, why, they can see each other.”) Or the horrors of the Dark Island, or the wonders of Ramandu’s Island? And then there are the wonders of that last sea, where the water is sweet, covered in lilies, and bathed in light. And, finally, a glimpse of Aslan’s country itself.I know many Narnia fans consider this there favorite Chronicle, almost as many as accord The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe that title. But for some reason the Caspian books were always my least favorites when I was a child, and I haven’t quite “rediscovered” this book the way I did with Prince Caspian. Still, this is a beautiful sea voyage story with deep themes, lovable characters, and exciting adventures. Highly recommended.
  • (5/5)
    Academics and literary authors (Tolkien amongst them) have often dismissed the Narnia books as nonsense - but regardless of their literary merit, they remain amongst my favourite books of all time. The Voyage of the Dawn Treader was the book I read under the covers with a flashlight when I should have been sleeping. I read it everyear - it is beautiful, escapist fiction. Ignore the occasional sexism and Christian symbolism and pretend to be six again. I read it every year.
  • (4/5)
    The Voyage of the Dawn Treader was my favorite of the Narnia books when I was a kid for two reasons: it's a seafaring adventure (however nominally), and it's, well, actually an adventure, with exploration of unknown worlds. I read it when I was about eleven or twelve years old, not long after being introduced to Homer's Odyssey thanks to the Wishbone program on PBS (I think - might've been a prose version that I read in school), and one of the big things about both books that I enjoyed was the strange and enchanting and maybe even dangerous places that the heroes came across.But as much as I liked the Odyssey parts of the book, and I really really liked them, I didn't care much for the characters themselves. I always felt that everyone treated Eustace horridly and that he had every right to be distrustful of Caspian and the others, and every right to be homesick. One of the big problems I had with the Narnia series when I was eleven persists in bugging me now, fourteen years later: everyone who has been to Narnia expects everyone else to automatically know and respect that Narnia is real and Aslan is real (and wonderful) even though there's absolutely no reason for these others to believe. If Eustace has been told all his life by his mother (one of the authority figures in his life whom he trusts) that the Pevensies are strange children and to be avoided, and if Eustace has never had reason to believe otherwise, why on earth shouldn't he believe that they're just playing a grand game of make believe when they talk about Narnia? I don't know but from the outset of Dawn Treader, I always have much greater sympathy for him than for Lucy or Edmund, and it bothers me that they seem to have absolutely no sympathy for him once they've all landed on the ship. The poor kid has suddenly had his entire perspective on the universe changed, of course he's going to react badly. And, besides, he's already not a very nice kid, even if he's a sympathetic character.Other than my opinions on Eustace growing stronger with the recent reread, I found my overall preference for this book out of the series growing more distinct as well. I thought the moralities of the islands a bit simplistic and heavy-handed, but other than stupid Aslan poking his head in, this is still the least wearisome of the Narnia books and the most exciting. It's also the best one for sparking an imagination and for the lack of allegory (not to say Lewis didn't stick allegory in wherever he could, it's just not as bad as in the other books).If I keep any of the Narnia books in my library, it will be this one, though I'm not sure I can bear to read about the way the Pevensies and Caspian treated Eustace again - this last time, my irritation was almost too much to enjoy the book at all.
  • (3/5)
    Wonderful book. I started slowly re-reading the series this past year - just before the first movie came out, of course. First time I've read these books since junior high, I think. Wondered if they would still be as wonderful as they were 15-20 years ago, and if I would actually pick up on all the imagery and allegory I missed as a child. Answers are, pleasingly, yes and yes. The Odyssey-like path of this book does present the same slight structural problems that all stories of this nature seem to have - a sense of it being a series of mostly disconnected episodes, the plot being extremely limited in the ways and extent to which it can dynamically build on itself, etc. - but at the same time, I really enjoyed how the islands and encounters got slightly more abstract and trippy the closer they got to The End Of The World. Quite enjoyable.
  • (4/5)
    As a child, this was my favorite of the Narnia series: a wide-ranging quest story, sending the characters beyond the boundaries of Narnia into the unknowns of the Lone Islands. There were adventures, daring, laughs and scares enough to go around. As an adult, coming back to the story, my position has changed a bit. It's still a very good story, but like most quest tales, it feels episodic, never really leading up to any particular climax; in fact, although it concludes with some beautiful imagery, the last few chapters really tailspin into a simple travelogue with no real plot. I found, this time, I wanted more: I wanted to follow Reepicheep into the sea beyond the end of the world, I wanted to visit Caspian on his sad return back to Ramandu's island, and his marriage to the wizard's daughter. Lewis leaves us hanging with a handful of great scenarios he only hints at, instead returning us - with stunning brevity - to the mundane world of reality and the end of the book. There are also some problematic aspects with the whole tone of the book. Lewis' essential moral in "Dawn Treader" seems to be that we should "be happy with our lot," because it is dissatisfaction that just keeps coming back again and again to bite at the characters. Eustace becomes a dragon when everyone's just about had enough of his moaninng; one of Caspian's lost lords falls prey to the lure of gold; the Dufflepuds are unhappy with their physical forms; Caspian himself nearly forsakes his kingdom to sail to Aslan's country. There's even a telling little moment when Caspian faces down a white slaver, who claims that such transactions are "progress." Caspian's response? That in Narnia, progress is not seen as necessarily a good thing. (And that's C.S. Lewis, a traditionalist if ever there was one, speaking straight through his characters.) But the problem is that if everyone did just what they were supposed to, there would be no excitement in this world, no wonder or adventure. Lewis comes close to admitting that with Lucy's despair at being unable to return to Narnia, but no...even that is seen as something she must accept. It's a bit of a weird message to send kids: don't get bigger than your boots, Johnny, or else.All that said, it's still a stirring adventure story, and it has some of Lewis' finest prose: his description of the end of the world is breathtaking, and there's a lovely little set piece when Lucy discovers the wizard's book on the island of the Duffers. As I have been listening to the unabridged audiobook, I should point out that Sir Derek Jacobi's narration is, as one might expect, everything you could ever wish for. Occasionally his high-pitched Reepicheep is a little trying, but the variety of voices and vocal levels he employs is really admirable, and he has a wonderfully kind and gentle narrative tone - rather like a kindly uncle. It's a wonderful listening experience overall.
  • (4/5)
    The Voyage of the Dawn Treader is my favorite book of the series. There isn't any Big Evil, just some greedy bureaucrats, storms, sea monsters and not-so-intelligent dwarves. Aslan of course lends a hand at crucial moments, but Reepicheep is really the conscience of this particular journey. It feels as if Lewis had a lot of fun making up strange islands and beasts, and the voyage propels the narrative forward.