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The Hidden Gallery: The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, Book 2

The Hidden Gallery: The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, Book 2

Scritto da Maryrose Wood

Narrato da Katherine Kellgren


The Hidden Gallery: The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, Book 2

Scritto da Maryrose Wood

Narrato da Katherine Kellgren

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (119 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
5 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 22, 2011
ISBN:
9780062012555
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Of especially naughty children, it is sometimes said, "They must have been raised by wolves."

The Incorrigible children actually were.

Thanks to the efforts of Miss Penelope Lumley, their plucky governess, Alexander, Beowulf, and Cassiopeia are much more like children than wolf pups now. They are accustomed to wearing clothes. They hardly ever howl at the moon. And for the most part, they resist the urge to chase squirrels up trees.

Despite Penelope's civilizing influence, the Incorrigibles still managed to ruin Lady Constance's Christmas ball, nearly destroying the grand house. So while Ashton Place is being restored, Penelope, the Ashtons, and the children take up residence in London. Penelope is thrilled, as London offers so many opportunities to further the education of her unique students.

But the city presents challenges, too, in the form of the palace guards' bearskin hats, which drive the children wild not to mention the abundance of pigeons the Incorrigibles love to hunt. As they explore London, however, they discover more about themselves as clues about the children's and Penelope's mysterious past crop up in the most unexpected ways.

A HarperAudio production.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Feb 22, 2011
ISBN:
9780062012555
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Maryrose Wood is the author of the first five books (so far!) in this series about the Incorrigible children and their governess. These books may be considered works of fiction, which is to say, the true bits and the untrue bits are so thoroughly mixed together that no one should be able to tell the difference. This process of fabrication is fully permitted under the terms of the author's Poetic License, which is one of her most prized possessions. Maryrose's other qualifications for writing these tales include a scandalous stint as a professional thespian, many years as a private governess to two curious and occasionally rambunctious pupils, and whatever literary insights she may have gleaned from living in close proximity to a clever but disobedient dog.

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Great tongue-in-cheek look at the indomitable Miss Lumley and her enlightened view of how to deal with these "incorrigible" children while living within the constraints of her job. There's no way I'm going to stop here-- the back story is hinted at and its chilling to think of how it will play out (before Miss Lumley gets things under control).
  • (4/5)
    This was a book club pick chosen by our resident librarian! I personally enjoyed the book and am now committed to reading at least the next installment because I need to know who is up to what. I knew going in this was a children's book but as I was reading I kept wondering what age group was this targeted to. If I had that answer I think I might have quit thinking that some of the subject matter might be over the readers head. It does remind me of the Lemony Snicket series which I enjoyed reading when my girls were reading them. My one regret was I had to read this during a very busy time and could not commit to just sitting down and reading it in large doses, that made it a bit fragmented so I am inclined to think and nit pick more than just enjoy the story. Over all I would recommend it to literary minded young people.
  • (4/5)
    DEEEEEEEEEEEEElightful!
  • (5/5)
    Again, a great book! Loved the narrator, did a wonderful job of making each character real. I was flooded with a warm feeling at the end and I loved the children’s way of adding woo at the end of each sentence. A book too cute to resist indeed.
  • (5/5)
    Nice story buildup ... And wonderfully read indeed. She really made the story come alive with her expressions and enthusiasm.
  • (4/5)
    This next installment in the Incorrigible Children series is even better than the first. Miss Lumley and the children move to London for the summer and the hunt is on! Lemony Snicket and Jane Austen would be proud of the trio of wolf babies and their governess.
  • (4/5)
    Delightful and charming, with a healthy dose of absurdist humor thrown in. Penelope, the 15 year old nanny and star of the book, has more sense than any of the adults she encounters. Nearly unflappable, Penelope has the confidence that her education at the Agatha Swanburne School for Poor Bright Girls can see her through any challenge, which it does. Having succeeded in taming the feral children in her charge, she now must navigate the unfamiliar dangers of London and foil the sinister plots of some rather odd and creepy people in her employers' social circle. Laugh out loud funny in many places. I'm looking forward to the next one in the series.
  • (5/5)
    Oh, those incorrigible children! In case you missed my raving review of the first book, let me assure you that this series is well worth your time. If you love Middle Grade books, especially ones full of charming characters and witty banter, then this is definitely for you. I fell head over heels for Miss Penelope Lumley and her three wolfish charges from the moment I met them. It's pretty much impossible not to. Perhaps it's "optoomuchistic" of me, but I do believe you'll adore this second book in the series!

    Before I do my gushing about the story itself, please allow me to once again praise Katherine Kellgren for her gorgeous narration of this story. Her accents are spot on, her voices for the children too sweet for words, and she just has a way of making the whole story come to life. From her plucky portrayal of Miss Penelope Lumley, to her all but ear-splitting rendition of Lady Ashton's voice, each character is brilliantly done! I will listen to all of these on audio if I can help it. They are absolutely wonderful!

    On to the story, shall we? In The Hidden Gallery, Miss Lumley and her spirited young charges are off to London! A new place to explore was thrilling enough, but what shot this into the five star category for me was the fact that this wasn't simply a jaunt into the big city. Adventures aplenty, and the revealing of some new clues about the origin of our the three wolfish children, made for a very fun read. I'm not certain whether my thoughts on how this will all work out are correct, but I'll say that I'm intrigued! Is there a possibility that our four main characters are linked? Perhaps, my friends. Perhaps.

    I know I'm being vague, but trust me when I say that it's necessary. There is so much to love about this story, but all of it is much better appreciated if you're experiencing it first hand. Suffice it to say that the word I use entirely too much while chatting up these books to others is charming. They truly are. These are the novels I wish were around when I was a Middle Grade reader. Although that won't stop me from reading them now, that's for sure. On to the next!
  • (4/5)
    This is actually the second book in a series, but thanks to the author's helpful blurb of the previous book at the beginning of the story, I was able to read this with very little problems. The book is about a Victorian governess's attempts to tame and school a trio of young children who were presumably abandoned by their parents and raised by wolves. It's not always easy, of course, being the governess to these three children, as all of them long to talk in barks and howls and they always have the urge to walk about on all fours, but the governess is largely successful in her efforts. This book details the governess and her pupils trip to London, where they must deal with thespian pirates, a tempting zoo, and a mysterious mystery about the childrens long-lost parents.This book was light, fluffy, and amusing. I finished it in a few hours, and it kept me occupied whilst in the throes of a fever. The mystery about the childrens' parentage is interesting enough, although I was a little dissapointed that it wasn't resolved at the end of the book. However, I enjoy the slighly satiric prose of the book, and it has good characters and interesting situations.
  • (5/5)
    The Hidden Gallery by Maryrose Wood is the second book in the Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place series. The first book in the series is currently a YRCA selection for 2013. The book picks up right where the first left off, with the mess of the ball still on everyone's mind. The heroine, Miss Penelope Lumley, decides it might be a good idea to take the children to London for a trip to clear their heads and get away from Ashton Place for awhile. She also wishes to visit with the headmistress of her former school whom she formed a close relationship with. When she asks Lady Constance, the wife of Lord Ashton, she agrees immediately, but to Penelope's dismay she decides to come along as well. When they arrive in London, things immediately begin to get mysterious again. Penelope receives a strange guidebook from her former headmistress and an old gypsy in the street yells some rather cryptic words at the children. Then, when Penelope finally meets with Miss Mortimer, her former headmistress she also gives her a rather mysterious warning regarding the moon and wolves. Through the rest of the book adventure and mystery ensue, including inebriated actors, questionable judges, and of course a hidden gallery. More questions arise about the origins of the children, of Lord Ashton, and even of Miss Penelope Lumley herself. We can only hope that some of these questions will be answered in the next book, The Unseen Guest. I enjoyed this book just as much as the first, once again for the humorous writing and the sense of mystery which permeated throughout. Jon Klassen's illustrations throughout helped to further the plot and provide some humorous asides. Maryrose Wood's writing is very strong again, particularly when she breaks from the plot to go of on humorous tangents. One such tangent that I particularly enjoyed is:"On the other hand , perhaps Mr. Burns was using his poetic license. This is the license that allows poets to say things that are not precisely true without being accused of telling lies. Anyone may obtain such a license, but still, the powers it grants must be wielded responsibly. (A word to the wise: When asked, "Who put the empty milk carton back in the refrigerator?" if you reply, "My incorrigible sister, Lavinia," when in fact it is you who are the guilty party, at the ensuing trial, the judge will not be impressed to hear you defend yourself by claiming that your whopper was merely "poetic license.")All in all, an enjoyable easy read that could be enjoyed by readers of almost any age.
  • (4/5)
    This was a very cute, fun, educational book to read. The narrator is not a character in the book, and it has a very "I'm being read to" feel about it. It reminded me of Lemony Snicket in a way. This book is not dark like that series, but the narrator has that mysterious type of feel. And there are mysteries that the narrator is leading us to, we just know it...we just don't know when. There are loads of questions this book opens up for the Incorrigibles, who I found to be perfectly adorable. I would love to see these children in action. They are all very sweet, smart, and creative children. This is the second in this series, and I am afraid I am going to have to go get the first book in this series to see how it all begins (I have been saying that a lot lately! But I have been coming across so many wonderful books!)This story is very entertaining for younger readers, there is comedy, action, mysteries and wolf children! How much better can it get??? The author inserts all sorts of educational tidbits that the children will eat up without even realize they are learning anything at all. It flows right into the story, so the children will absorb the material, I think it is just magnificent how it is done. I think any classroom would benefit from having a copy of this for the students to read and parents would have just as much fun reading this to their children. It is a fun book with fun characters!!
  • (4/5)
    In this, the second book of the series, plucky governess Penelope Lumley and her three Incorrigible charges travel to London. Penelope is full of plans for educational outings, as well as a visit with her friend and former headmistress Miss Mortimer, but all does not go as planned. On the journey to London, they meet a sly stranger who seems intent upon stealing the travel guide Miss Mortimer sent to help them in their travels, and upon reaching London they meet other people, including a mysterious old woman, a sleazy judge, and a kind young man with a gleam of genius in his eye. Their time in London is full of ferns, elephants, velocipedes, pirates, letters, and a well-hidden gallery, which their otherwise useless guide book describes in great detail.The writing style and characters in this book are just as enjoyable as they were in the first book, but though the plot moves right along, it does not seem to resolve well at the end. There are many hints and clues that will, no doubt, be important later in the series, but the Incorrigibles' visit to Hidden Gallery itself is actually a bit anticlimactic. Readers who enjoyed the first book in the series will probably enjoy this one as well, but it certainly leaves a lot of loose threads for the author to deal with in upcoming volumes. Who is Judge Quinzey, really? Will Penelope and her new friend Simon meet again? Why is Miss Mortimer so insistent about Penelope using the hair poultice? What is the connection between the painting in the Hidden Gallery and the one in the attic of Ashton Place? How did the Incorrigibles end up being raised by wolves, and who are their parents? Where are Penelope's parents, and why must their correspondence with her be so secretive? The rest of the series promises to be just as enjoyable as the first two volumes, and readers of this book will be left hoping that additional volumes will be quickly forthcoming.
  • (3/5)
    I was unable to avoid a little disappointment in my reading of this installment in The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place series. It was not a strong sequel, which is a shame as I did so much want to like it. The Hidden Gallery has many of the same shortcomings as the first, but as the story stretches on I find them harder and harder to overlook. The children are still very much a lump character, and there is very little reason for the reader to differentiate between them. When they were still fresh from the wild, still a pack, this made sense, but I wanted them to grow and develop significantly more than they did. Some effort was made to grow them, one of the boys becomes an art fanatic, the other develops a love of navigation and Cassiopeia is apparently a math prodigy (isn’t she five? Solving for the area of a triangle?), but that’s the long and the short of it. I cannot even remember which boy has which hobby, but it honestly doesn’t seem to matter. I find them mildly amusing, in a distant sort of way, but I don't really care about them.I felt like more of the humor fell flat too. Not that there weren’t funny bits, such as the attack on the guards pictured on the cover, but there were more bits that tried to be funny and were just embarrassing: “At that point Beowulf scooted up to show Penelope and Simon a new trick he had invented on the velocipede (he called it ‘popping a wheelawoo’). . .” I had to stop reading for a little while after that. I wish that I didn’t think poorly about Wood’s writing. I really love her idea, and the direction I foresee the story going is intriguing. I raced through The Mysterious Howling and wanted to share it with others, even suggesting it to a few children I thought might think it a good read. I’ll wind up loaning out The Mysterious Howling and I would definitely spend money on a sequel, but for the idea and because I wanted/expected better than The Hidden Gallery and I think Wood could deliver. If it was not so, I wouldn’t have finished the book, holding my breath and hoping it would redeem itself.
  • (4/5)
    The worst part about this book was that it was compared to Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events. Comparing one book to another, arguably, more popular book, or series, or author, or what have you is very dangerous, as it causes the astute reader to view the work at hand through a more critical lens usually reserved for books and series and authors who have proven their worth enough to get there.This gave me a terrible first impression of the book, as I've read other books in the past that have been likened to other, more popular books, series, and authors, some even to the point of declaring themselves superior, only to be let down.So, what can I say about the author, Maryrose Wood, and her ability to overcome these publisher-laden handicaps?One word: Wow.Now other words: Wood has crafted here an atypical governess story, clearly inspired by the Victorian-era chick-lit, but also with a healthy dose of modern-day humor, and a bit of the hair of the dog that bit ya.The premise of the series as a whole, The Incorrigible Children of Ashton Place, is that some feral foundlings, the eponymous children who are dubbed with the surname Incorrigible are put under the charge of a governess named Penelope who has more pluck than anything else. By the end of the first volume, she's managed to convince them to sit up straight, use utensils, and stop eating most woodland creatures. Nevertheless, their surrogate lupine parentage comes through at the most inopportune times.In the second volume, the one I'm reviewing, the Ashtons, their servants, the Incorrigibles, and Penelope all go to London, where many mysteries are reveled, some are only slightly uncovered, and many, many more are introduced.While Maryrose Wood is not exactly Lemony Snicket, she is Maryrose Wood, and that should be enough.
  • (4/5)
    "Ahwoooooooooooo!"As Agatha Swanburn says, "She who waits for the perfect moment to act will never make a turn at a busy intersection." And so we are delighted by this and other revelations of a Victorian lady as related by her student Penelope. I haven't read the first book but I intend to now. I was afraid this boook might just be fluff. However, as I got more into the book I really enjoyed the developing mystery surrounding this family.My only fear is that it will start leaning to the supernatural which I would not enjoy...we'll see. But so far the Incorrigible Children have been wonderwooooo!!!!
  • (4/5)
    Loved book 2 as much, perhaps more than the first part. There is no doubt about reading the final installment.Suitable for 10+ and great fro reading aloud..
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed this book, but not quite as much as the first one. I'm still willing to read book three!
  • (3/5)
    Read this with the girl.
  • (5/5)
    Such a fun and delightful book! I adored it.
  • (4/5)
    We listened to this on audiobook, and it was a favorite with the whole family. Hilarious writing and fantastic narration. I knocked off one star because I don't like cliffhanger endings.
  • (5/5)
    So I started off thinking this was an amusing children's book but that I would not be likely to continue with the series. WRONG, I must know why is her hair red, what's up with Lord Frederick, will the children be okay...
    I really enjoyed the whole book!
  • (4/5)
    Wonderful and very fun little story and excellent storytelling. I love the rhythm of the prose and the structure with her frequent and humorous little back references to things from a couple pages earlier.
    I'm having a little more trouble than I expected finding the next one and I'm anxious.
  • (4/5)
    At age 15, Miss Penelope Lumley, recently graduated from the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females, is on her way to her first position as a governess. When she arrives at Ashton Place, she is shocked to learn that her young charges have been raised by wolves!It's hard to describe this story without making it sound silly. It is silly, but it's also cleverly poking fun at tropes in children's literature and it's an entertaining story whether you catch the references or not. Because of this, it works well as a story for both children and adults to read - if it's your first story about wild children and governesses, great, and if it's not, you'll chuckle along with the narrator even more knowledgeably. It's smart without feeling didactic; I was amused by the explanations of irony, for example, and the use of poetry was fun without feeling forced. I'd be hard-pressed to tell you if I preferred the audio or the book, since the former is superbly read by Katherine Kellgren, while the latter includes illustrations from Caldecott Award-winning illustrator Jon Klassen.
  • (4/5)
    Great story with all the elements to keep kids reading. Loved the idea and the governess character.
  • (3/5)
    After finding three children apparently raised by wolves on his property, Lord Ashton hires Penelope Lumley to be their governess. While the job is not exactly what she expected, 15 year old Penelope does her best to tutor her new charges in manners as well as academics. Where did the children come from? Who set up the terrible occurrences at the Christmans party, and what were they trying to cause?
  • (2/5)
    A fifteen year old becomes the governess at a strange and mysterious manor. Her charges are three children found living among the wolves; she civilizes them while trying to puzzle out her boss's motives.

    Too young for me to enjoy, but a nice read if you've been missing the Lemony Snicket series.
  • (2/5)
    This series has been compared to Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events, and that comparison is very true, in my opinion. Unfortunately, I didn't like Lemony Snicket's series, so I wish I had read that comparison before I started this book. Most of the characters in the book were very flat. There was a huge mysterious buildup as to who the orphan children really are, but unfortunately, little resolution was given to the end of the story. One major event was resolved (the Christmas Party), but everything else was pushed off to the next book in the series. I don't mind cliffhangers, but I would like something to hold me until I get to the next book. I was left with nothing on this one. Slightly disappointing.
  • (4/5)
    The 5th book of this series just came out, and I finally got around to reading the first one. I really enjoyed it; it is smart, funny, engaging and quirky. With a lexile level of 1000 and an AR level of 6.8, this is a great book for those middle grade students who need a higher reading level without some of the YA content. It contains many pearls of wisdom from the inimitable Agatha Swanburne, not to mention our young governess-heroine Penelope. There are quotes from literature, and even some Latin phrases thrown in for good measure. With that being said, you might assume this is one of those books that adults love but middle graders don't like. However, I have several students who love this series. This would be a good family read-aloud, or a road trip book. I understand the narrarator is fabulous. There are a lot of mysteries left unexplained, so be ready to start the next one quickly
  • (4/5)
    Fun and quick read about 3 children found in the woods & their "civilizing" by the 15-year-old narrator who has been hired to be their governess.
  • (5/5)
    After completing her education at the Swanburne Academy for Poor Bright Females, 15-year-old Penelope Lumley accepts a post as governess at Ashton Place. The intrepid governess is not daunted upon learning that her three charges have just been captured in the woods where they have been living in the wild. Miss Lumley simply adds instruction in personal grooming, wearing clothing, and speaking to her curriculum of mathematics, geography, language, and literature (with occasional distractions from squirrels). Miss Lumley's skills will soon be put to the test when the lady of the house decides to host a Christmas party with the children in attendance.Katherine Kellgren's narration further enhances an already delightful fairytale-like story. All of her characterizations are outstanding, but I particularly enjoyed hearing the children's voices as they struggled with human speech. Readers should be forewarned that the story ends with a cliff-hanger. I'm eager to get my hands on the next book in the series, and it will have to be the audio version now I that I know how good it is in that format.