Trova il tuo prossimo audiolibro preferito

Abbonati oggi e ascolta gratis per 30 giorni
Arrow to the Sun

Arrow to the Sun

Scritto da Gerald McDermott

Narrato da Gerald McDermott


Arrow to the Sun

Scritto da Gerald McDermott

Narrato da Gerald McDermott

valutazioni:
3.5/5 (25 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
7 minuti
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1975
ISBN:
9780545257435
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

This Pueblo Indian myth explains how the spirit of the Lord of the Sun was brought to the world of men.
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1975
ISBN:
9780545257435
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore


Correlato a Arrow to the Sun

Audiolibri correlati

Recensioni

Cosa pensano gli utenti di Arrow to the Sun

3.4
25 valutazioni / 26 Recensioni
Cosa ne pensi?
Valutazione: 0 su 5 stelle

Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Cultures have used myths to explain the world. In Arrow to the Sun, the Pueblo Indian tale, the spark of life is sent to Earth by the Sun. The illustrations are intense. Great book to add to collection of traditional literature to showcase a variety of cultures.
  • (2/5)
    In my opinion, the illustrations are more interesting than this particular story. I've heard Native American stories that were a lot more "colorful," story-wise.
  • (3/5)
    1975 Caldecott Winner

    I really enjoyed the illustrations in this book.
  • (2/5)
    Older story, not really impressed by the graphics or the story. The story was short and simple and could be used in a classroom with children to promote understanding and knowledge.
  • (3/5)
    A young Indian boy sets out to find his father. He must travel and ask many people about his father until he find him. He comes across a man who gives him an arrow that allows the boy to travel to the sun where he finds his long lost father. I was very excited to read the book due to the fact that it was about the Native American culture, because some where down the line in my family we had Native Americans. After reading this story I was not all that impressed with it. I think what I didn't care for was the illustrationns, not the actual text. As an adult the illustrations for me were hard to follow and understand, I would guess that it would be a lot more diffuclt for a child to enjoy the drawings. I also did not like the fact that the illustrator only stuck to a couple of colors.
  • (2/5)
    My favorite thing about the myth was the illustrations. The author chose to provide authentic pictures that capture the unique qualities of Pueblo art. The myth reflects how the Pueblo Indian people highly regard and respect for the sun being the source of life. Obviously, in the Pueblo Indian region, the sun is a major part of life and this myth is in appreciation of it. The illustrations are completely capturing the Pueblo style of art. However, I was not as much of a fan of the writing. There seemed to be little character development and love stories where the characters are relatable.
  • (3/5)
    Personal Response:I like that the illustrations are based off Pueblo art and the common hero elements in the story: hero sets off on a quest to find out who he is, hero endures a series of trials, hero triumphs in the end.Curricular Connections:I would use this story as part of a story time on heroes from around the world.
  • (4/5)
    This story by McDermott shares the creation myth of the Pueblo people and how fire/light came to Earth. The illustrations are simple collage or colored pencils, maybe.
  • (3/5)
    This Myth does a fantastic job of portraying the Pueblo Indian culture. The illustrations are so amazing. The colors are so vivid and bright. This would be a great story to read during a native american unit, or just to expose students to other cultures.
  • (5/5)
    The illustrations in this book earned a Caldecott Medal in 1975 for the outstanding Native American imagery it contains. They were produced using a four step, colored ink process. The story tells of a boy who goes on a quest to find his father and must endure four trials to prove his lineage to the Lord of the Sun. This story speaks to the reader of the rich spiritual culture of the Pueblos. As in other Native American myths and legends, the spirit of the boy is transformed as he endures journeys and trials to reach maturity. The illustrations provide clues to this transformation: in the beginning, the boy is drawn completely black with a single feather in his head dress. By the end of the story, he is filled in with many colors and the head dress he wears is full and vibrant. This is a great example of a coming-of-age story that all cultures can appreciate and be inspired by.Library Implications: While the illustrations and length of this story make it suitable for young children, I feel the underlying theme and spiritual content would make this a valuable read for older children as well. The librarian could work with English teachers to develop a study of myths and legends from various Native American groups. This would be a great way to compare and contrast belief systems. Students could also use a scaled-down version of the illustration technique to present pictures of themselves transformed after a particular trial of their own
  • (4/5)
    Other children ridicule the Boy who has no father, so he sets out to learn who his father is. Finally, the third person he comes to in the "world of Men," the Arrow Maker, is willing to help him. He turns the Boy into an arrow, and shoots him to the sun who poses a test to the Boy to determine who he really is. The Boy must pass through the Kiva of Lions, the Kiva of Serpants, the Kiva of Bees,and the Kiva of Lightening. Easily, the Boy did this and was filled with the power of the sun. Father sent him back to Earth where people celebrated his return.
  • (4/5)
    Amazing illustrations, very authentic of the Pueblo Indians. Every page was so vibrant with color and the storyline speaks to many that want to journey out and find their missing parent. This is a wonderful tale about the sun and the earth. This is a great way to kick off the study of geometric shapes and how it can be used in the arts. I really enjoyed looking at this book.
  • (2/5)
    This book is a tale about a boy who never knew his father. The story follows the boy through proving himself as the Lord Of The Sun's son. The book possesses challenges of finding one's self, and comfort of family knowledge.
  • (4/5)
    This retelling of a Pueblo Indian folktale about a boy who must undergo trials while searching for his father won the Caldecott medal for its vibrant art. The story is a simple, familiar one, but with one with great importance for the culture from whence it came. The art is bright and beautiful. The story could be slightly confusing for younger readers who would not be able to understand the symbolism, but the pictures would be very appealing.
  • (2/5)
    The caldecott winner in 1974, this is a beautifully illustrated creation myth. Done with gauching.
  • (4/5)
    The art is so graphic and vibrant. It is interesting to make such static images seem full of movement. They also sort of look like early video games. Okay story about a boy searching for his father, but the art is the best part.
  • (4/5)
    Bright and colorful Native American tale
  • (3/5)
    This book is a good example of a folktale, because it has been passed down from generation to generation. The story also has the hero prevail in the end and finally gain acceptance from his town. The illustrations in this book are quite good. They are made in gouache and ink. They bring a good contrast to the page and really engage the reader. The illustrations also play a crucial part in the telling of the story.
  • (3/5)
    This is the legend of how the sun had a child with a Pueblo woman. He travelled to the sun by arrow, proved himself through challenges, and returned to his people.
  • (4/5)
    The subtitle is A Pueblo Indian Tale, and the Caldecott-winning artwork is reminiscent of Native art I’ve seen, with a color palette rich with oranges, reds, yellows and browns. The book relates how the Lord of the Sun sent his spirit to the people of earth. I cannot help but compare this Pueblo Indian tale with the story of Christ.The Lord of the Sun sends a “spark of life” to earth, where it enters the house of a maiden, who then has a baby. The boy is persecuted by others, and then travels to his Father. After enduring several trials the father tells the son, “you must return to earth … and bring my spirit to the world of men.” So he returns to earth, and the people celebrate with the “dance of life.”
  • (5/5)
    rrow to the Sun is an art lover's dream. The colors are vibrant, the geometric retelling of the story is bold and at times even humorous. I had mixed reactions when I read this book to my children: my son who tends to be less artistically inclined did not enjoy the art, but our four year old boy loved it. The myth is beautiful and inspiring and has all the magic and mystery wrapped in the art as well as the text.
  • (4/5)
    6.The Pueblo Indian tale by Gerald McDermott is a variation of a Pueblo Indian myth which explains how the spirit if the Lord of the Sun was brought to the world of men. The overall message of this exquisite picture book is the endurance and persistence to finding an answer to a question without allowing obstacles to block your path. I liked this book for a few reasons. First, the story’s theme was meaningful because it taught persistence and inner strength can get you through any hardship. Though, the setting was dated back to the Pueblo Indian’s era, the plot is suspenseful. A son was dedicated in figuring out who his real father was, which in the end it was the Lord of the Sun, however the organization of the plot was engaging. Second, the story helps the reader to understand the different perspective of the Pueblo Indian time period. Additionally, the illustrations are created by bright, vibrant colors and symbolic type of shapes to resemble the traditions of Indian myths and tales. Third, the picture book creates mythical characters, but their point of views and perspectives are like human nature. For example, a son is looking to find his real father as his peers make fun of him for not knowing his true parent. I like how the book creates an accurate setting for the time period, but the overall big idea of the story can relate to readers experiences.
  • (5/5)
    great images, colorful, simple, and powerful
  • (4/5)
    This traditional story of a boy searching for his father, who happens to be the sun was a fun quest showing the reader the older traditions of the Pueblo Indians like doing the Dance of Life and importance of the sun to them, which is the source of all life. The illustrations were specifically native American and really made the reader feel that they were reading a book made by the native American Indians. instead of the usual looking people or sun, they had a fun Pueblo Indian twist along with the colors that they used, which were mostly orange, yellow, brown, and black, until the very end. The journey that the boy went on to find his father was also very interesting because he had to become an arrow and then pass a series of tests in order to prove he was the sun's son. When he came back to the village he was celebrated because of his newfound power and this quest was very interesting for the reader and told in a great way. I thought that the illustrations throughout the book were the most important, and best, part to this story, even though the story and plot line were great too. Going on a journey and returning a hero is something ever child likes to read and this father and son relationship could be used as a parallel to any father and son pair in the real world.
  • (3/5)
    Summary:The book is a pueblo tale about a boy trying to find out who his father is. He goes to different people asking if they know where his father could be. The arrow maker knew who the father was, so he fitted the boy to his bow and flew it to the sun. When he arrive on the sun, the boy found out that his father was the sun lord. Personal Reaction:I really like the book because I am Native American and it teaches about my culture. The pictures in the book are interesting because they are made out of different shapes.Classroom Extension ideas:1. Introduce children to the Native American culture.2. Have the children draw a picture using shapes like the book does.
  • (4/5)
    Unlike most story picture books, this one uses strong bold shapes and colors to make it’s pictures, even the humans are made of geometric shapes. These shapes and drawings bring in a true sense of Native American culture and beliefs. This story is about a boy who is in search of his father who he was made fun of for not having one. Fantasy is extremely present as the boy becomes an arrow and his father is the sun. Some pages are absent of words, but the illustration does a great job depicting the scene.