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The Kingdom Keepers: Disney after Dark

The Kingdom Keepers: Disney after Dark

Scritto da Ridley Pearson

Narrato da Gary Littman


The Kingdom Keepers: Disney after Dark

Scritto da Ridley Pearson

Narrato da Gary Littman

valutazioni:
4/5 (83 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
6 ore
Pubblicato:
Aug 29, 2005
ISBN:
9781423306931
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Using a cutting-edge technology called DHI - which stands for both Disney Host Interactive and Daylight Hologram Imaging - Finn Whitman, an Orlando teen, and four other kids are transformed into hologram projections that guide guests through the park.

The new technology turns out, however, to have unexpected effects that are both thrilling and scary. Soon Finn finds himself transported in his DHI form into the Magic Kingdom at night. Is it real? Is he dreaming?

Finn's confusion only increases when he encounters Wayne, an elderly Imagineer who tells him that the park is in grave danger. Led by the scheming witch, Maleficent, a mysterious group of characters called the Overtakers is plotting to destroy Disney's beloved realm, and maybe more.

This gripping high-tech tale will thrill every kid who has ever dreamed of sneaking into Walt Disney World after hours and wondered what happens at night, when the park is closed.
Pubblicato:
Aug 29, 2005
ISBN:
9781423306931
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Ridley Pearson is the bestselling author of over fifty novels, including Peter and the Starcatchers (cowritten with Dave Barry) and the Kingdom Keepers and Lock and Key series. He has also written two dozen crime novels, including Probable Cause, Beyond Recognition, Killer Weekend, The Risk Agent, and The Red Room. To learn more about him, visit www.ridleypearson.com.

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83 valutazioni / 54 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    This book is the first in a series of adventure and mystery children's novels set in the Walt Disney World theme parks that I'm reading to my Disney fan daughter.  The basic gist is that five young teenagers have been used as models for holographic theme park guides in Disney's Magic Kingdom known as Disney Host Interactive (DHI).  A simple one-time acting gig unexpectedly leads the kids to start crossing over in their sleep and appearing in the Magic Kingdom in the form of their holograms.  An old and mysterious Imagineer named Wayne tells them that they were created to counter the characters of Disney villains who are coming to life and trying to take over the parks (and thus known as the Overtakers).The five teens kind of have a Scooby Doo crew crossed with a Disney Channel Original Movie vibe.  Finn is the leader and the main protagonist of the book.  Charlene is an athletic cheerleader who is often frightened about participating in the adventures. Maybeck, a tall African-American, is the sceptic of the group and typically responds with sarcasm.  Willa, possibly of Native American background, is more positive and is good at working out clues.  Philby is the redheaded tech genius of the group.  Finn's mysterious friend Amanda also helps out, although she is not a DHI.They have to solve a mystery by finding clues on the rides.  The Overtakers try to stop them by turning the rides against them.  Which leads to the creepiest scene ever in It's a Small World that will totally ruin the ride for you. They ultimately have to face down Malificent and her sidekick Jez.It's a fun and interesting story, and much more of a literary children's book than you might expect from it's commercial tie-in with a big theme park.  In fact, since the Disney company is so image conscious, I'm surprised that they actually make the company look bad at some points in the narrative.  My daughter enjoyed this book and I expect we'll be reading the whole series. 
  • (4/5)
    What a wild, fantastic ride!! I was as engrossed as my son. And talk about your giant cliff hangers...not one thing was actually explained or resolved! We are so glad we already purchased #2!!
  • (3/5)
    Interesting premise, decent characters, a bit shaky on the execution. The story got a little convoluted at times, and the author seemed to revel in their insider knowledge of all things Disney World. Still going to read the next one.
  • (4/5)
    This book was SO much better than I expected. Fun characters, neat storyline.
  • (2/5)
    The story had an interesting premise, but the delivery was just okay. There were lots of plotholes that were never filled in. It doesn't seem like the holes were left as cliffhangers, the author just moved on and seemed to forget about them. The beginning was very slow, but when the action picked up, it did get interesting enough to hold my attention. I will pick up book two to see if there is improvement in the series.
  • (3/5)
    "Kingdom Keepers: Disney After Dark" was a great book. In the story, five middle school students became a part of a new program that was promoted for the Disney parks. This program was called, "DHI" for, "Daylight Hologram Imaging" and in this program, the five kids, Finn, Charlene, Maybeck, Philby, and Willa were guides of the park and told the visitors all about the park, and Walt Disney. Although the job was a dream come true, there were secrets that were revealed through out the story. The biggest secret that was revealed was that after hours, the villains were in a group called " The Overtakers" and they were attempting to take over the park. Throughout the story, Ridley Pearson tells the story of how Finn and his friends battle against the Overtakers and their leader, Maleficent. I enjoyed reading this book because the author tells the story of this magic happening at he Disney parks in a way that definitely made myself as a reader believe in the magic that took place. This made me enjoy the book because on a personal example, I have been going to Disney World for approximately 8 years and this book has made my view on the park completely different. I recommend this book to anyone who has a love for Disney, mystery, action, and even magic.This book has a spellbinding plot that will have readers unable to put their book down.
  • (5/5)
    I gave this book a five star because I felt it's idea and topic was original. It also was funny and kept you hooked till the end. In The Kingdom Keepers book the five main characters take a job in the magic kingdom to make daylight holographic imaging of them selves to guide people around the park. Soon they find, out after the holograms are finished, when they go to sleep they get transported into their holograms. through out the book they have a adventure that in some points puts their lives in danger. in the end can they defeat the evil characters that threaten the park or will these evil beings take over the park and shut it down.
  • (2/5)
    I barely finished this one. Thirty-three percent through and I was speed-reading just to get to the end. I really should have just stopped, but the idea sounded too good not to follow through, like Kingdom Hearts. But it's not worth your time.The concept is ideal for any Disneyphile-evil lurks in the park and five kids have to stop it, going on rides after close and exploring cast member tunnels and doing all the things you're not allowed to do. Walt Disney World goes from a place of joy to a battleground. Anyone who's been to a Disney Park at least once should be intrigued.But you shouldn't. It's so poorly executed and poorly written. Like it was a rush job. The characters have no depth. They don't even get the depth of stereotypes. No one has a personality. I could not tell you the difference between the two girls of this five person team. And they're barely in the book as it is. Anyone who's not the "team leader" gets barely any screen time. The two other boys are "the big guy" and "the computer guy" but "the big guy" occasionally feeds information about computers and "the computer guy" acts weak and nerdy. No one has internal goals or distinguishing characteristics. Power Rangers had better characterization.The story is all event. And they throw in some BS about how these kids are "holographic cast members" and that gives them the ability to be in the park after it closes. This is a thing that doesn't exist in the park, and I had to try explaining to my kids five times. It's rooted in science but acts like magic and has no rules around it. It just happens. Once they're in the park, they have to do some lame The Da Vinci Code style sleuthing, because Walt Disney knew that his movies were going to come to life and imprison the guests in dungeons down below. That's a sentence I just said. This fetch quest accomplishes its job of filling out pages by making every obstacle the same--you get on a ride, the ride malfunctions, but you succeed anyway without any lasting consequences. Goalposts are never pushed back.Kids deserve better than this. The only highlight is seeing the things you saw in Disney World, and only in the "hey I remember that" way.This is no Percy Jackson or Wimpy Kid. I did not care whether the characters lived or died. And there were too many of them anyway. In addition to the Team of Five, there are two girls with ambiguous motives but the same non-personality, an Imagineer mentor, and "the adults who know nothing". The author can explain the Utilidor under the park, but not why these kids matrix-jump into their holograms when they fall asleep nor how that works. That's like Benedict Cumberbatch doing the mocap for Smaug, then going to sleep and finding himself IN the film. It feels like the author was writing to a deadline or to the specifications of investors and focus groups. Pick up a Travel Guide instead.
  • (2/5)
    A simple story about good and evil. This story is predictable, but it was an okay read. Not a favorite of mine, but solid.
  • (5/5)
    This is a great book for any fan of Disney World. Using cutting-edge technology, five Florida teens have been transformed into Holographic Hosts at Disney World’s Magic Kingdom. It all seems to be going well, until the kids begin having disturbing dreams that start affecting their everyday lives. They sneak in after the park has closed, and Wayne, a retired Imagineer, directs them in their fight against the Overtakers – Disney Villians. I found myself chuckling out loud several times, and look forward to read the next books in the series. Although I feel you’d only appreciate and understand the story if you’ve been to WDW, it really makes me want to go back so I can see it in this new light (I knew there was something unnerving about those animatronic kids in the “Small World” ride).
  • (3/5)
    This Disney story takes place at the MAgic Kingdom in Orlando. It's a classic good verses evil tale centered around 5 kids and a wicked Maleficent. It felt very gimicky even for a kids book. The only saving grace is the level of the writing and adventure. Not sure I would recommend it to anyone but die-hard disney fans.
  • (3/5)
    Fun concepts in a playful story set in Disney world. I suspect the normal target audience (young readers) will like this adventure. I enjoyed it from the standpoint of a nice "behind the scenes" plot. Next time I am in Disney World I wonder if I'll be looking for clues Walt may have scattered throughout the park.
  • (4/5)
    You think you know what happens in Diseny Land after dark, but this book will make what you know to the next level.Finn Whitman is just a kid looking for a way to earn money, but little does he know the dangers of becoming a DHI. (Disney Host Interactive or Digital Hologram I ). Wayne, on old imagioneer, tells Finn that him ond the other DHIs need tofind out what the "Stonecutter's Quill" means. They then go through the trouble of find the clues to desiphering it on the rides that have to do with; water, stone, clouds, and sun. They find out what it means and battle Maleficent, an evil which, with her so called daughter, Jez. Now this all happenes when you and I are aspleep in our beds.
  • (5/5)
    I've never been to Disney world or any other Disney park. But after reading this novel, I really want to go to one!There are a lot of things I enjoy about this novel but one of my favorites is how Pearson kept the realism of the park and added some elements without making it boring or repetitive. I really love this book and it goes to show that you can write a book for kids and have it be amazing. If you are looking for a fun mystery with some familiar characters than this is the book for you.
  • (4/5)
    Middle school student Finn Whitman gets the opportunity of a lifetime when he is chosen to be part of Disney's latest scheme- Disney Host Interactive, or DHI. DHIs are holographic hosts who escort guests around the park. Everything is going well until Finn and the other DHIs find themselves locked inside the park after hours. Maleficent, the evil witch from Sleeping Beauty, comes alive and tries to hatch an evil plot. Because Pearson sets the book in Walt Disney World, the book has a sense of realism. The rides and characters are not imagined, but actually exist, thus giving the reader a clear picture in his or her mind. Pearson also mixes technology (DHIs) with pre-established Disney icons/fairy tale characters (Maleficent, Mickey Mouse, Tom Sawyer), which helps to deepen the book. I will be picking up the sequels as soon as possible.
  • (1/5)
    The book "Kingdom Keepers: Disney After Dark" is about a boy named Finn who gets stuck in disney world. I think this book was good, however it depends on what level reader you are.This book was probably made for a second grader looking forward on going to disney world. For a middle schooler I would not recomend this book.
  • (4/5)
    Blake says this book is fabulous, awesome and amazing and that I would really like it. This from the kid who wasn't sure about it when I picked it up for him at the library. I knew he would like it because he loved Peter and the Starcatchers and he loved Walt Disney World. Of course this is mostly fictional but fresh off a WDW trip he is just eating it up. We had to rush to the library for the next one.
  • (4/5)
    I love it when one of my boys reads a book and then gives it to me to read with an excited, "You've got to read this!" My son liked this book both because of the plot and because the story is set at Disney World. (We just visited there in December.) When the evil Overtakers threaten the happiest place on earth, five middle school kids have to save the day. The book is filled with references to Magic Kingdom rides. Although it starts a little slowly, the plot picks up about halfway through and pulls readers along to the end. This is the first in a series, and I'm pretty sure that both Ben and I will be reading the next one!
  • (2/5)
    If you like Disneyworld, chances are you might enjoy this quick, delightful read of five youngsters who are given a unique opportunity to have their physical bodies become holograms. Soon the reality and fantasy mesh as they learn the dark side of Disney at night when the Pirates become real swashbucklers, the small world dolls escape from their platforms and evil mayhem abounds as the evil witch Maleficent reigns supreme.It was a light, breezy read. At times I was frustrated because the plot was very scattered and the text not well written. But, I did enjoy the creativity.Guardedly recommended.
  • (3/5)
    This is an interesting idea that was not executed well. Characters that get to go around the magic kingdom after closing to try to solve a mystery is a intreguing plot. The backstory of how they are able to do that is creative. The Disney characters coming to life is fun. There is so much potential that is just wasted with poor writing and poor editing. The charters, both human and Disney, are not fleshed out. There is much talk about how they are a important to the team, yet they never seem to work as one, and we don't really see anything that distinguishes them and makes them each special. The purpose of the characters Amanda and Jez never seem to fit. Finn's relationship with his parents brings unnecessary conflict. Wayne, the main characters' guide, is more confusing than helpful. There is only one real villan, and we never understand her motivation. If the villans can come to life and try to disrupt the magic kingdom, why aren't the good characters trying to stop them. I was not impressed with this book. My eleven year old daughter did enjoy it, so we will probably get more in the series. I hope that they get better.
  • (4/5)
    The main character in the story is Finn, a 13 year old boy who lives in Florida and is very familiar with Disney World. He and four other kids were selected after a rigorous process, to become Disney's first holographic hosts...kind of an animated, walking and talking holographic image of themselves. All is well until Finn and others discover that when they fall asleep they "cross over" into the Magic Kingdom in some weird state that is half human and half holographic image. On these nighttime excursions, animatronics and Disney characters seem to come to life, and most of them are up to no good. An older cast member named Wayne who lives at the park explains to them that an evil magic is at work, and that they need to solve the puzzle of the Stonemason's Quill to overcome it. Thus begins their adventures in the park after dark.Well, this is a children's book, but I loved it. It started out a little slow, but really picked up once they were on the quest for the Stonemason's quill. Some rides, like It's a Small World and Splash Mountain will probably never be the same for me...lol. I will say, though, that Pearson does not spend a lot of time describing the rides or the park. There is an assumption of fammiliarty which could probably make the story less enjoyable if you have never been there.
  • (5/5)
    Shows a new darker side of the Disney Parks. Since I've been to Disney really easy and fun to follow along and picture myself in the main characters shoes. Really good book that I recommend to anyone who loves anything Disney.
  • (3/5)
    This book feels like a Disney production, in the same way the you can seen a short clip of a performance and know that it came from Disney World or a Disney Channel show. There is just enough of everything to make it appear happy, well-rehearsed, and a place you might like to be. Missing is depth, natural flow, and realistic serendipity. Kingdom Keepers is based on fictional Disney production (the DHI's), so it is fully in keeping with the Disney production model. The use of proper names for various park elements felt somewhat forced, at times making this little novel feel like a Disney advertisement. Readers barely get to know the main character, learning a little more than a name for the supporting characters. To be honest, I don't like the Mouse, never really did, and this opinion colors my view on this book. If you don't have strong feelings against all things Disney, this will most likely be a fun read.
  • (4/5)
    A lot of fun to read. The background of "Disney After Dark" is well realized, and the YA characters are well done. The premise is not completely fleshed out - but the author is trying to save something for the sequel. The premise is that certain evil forces have been set loose in Disney World, originating from the evil characters of the Disney stories. A group of chosen teenagers find themselves half human and half hologram, and the future goodness of Disney World, and the real world depends on their teamwork and fortitude. The evil character of record is Malificent, but there will undoubtedly be more. I'm looking forward to the sequel.
  • (4/5)
    Selected as virtual "hosts" or Disney Host Interactive (DHI) models for Disney World's Orlando theme park, five teen get more than they bargained for (a nice paycheck and perpetual park passes). Turns out the cutting edge technology that transformed them into holograms also connected them with their virtual selves, and now they're spending their dreaming hours in the park. Not such a bad gig you say? Well, everything isn't exactly kosher. It seems that the DHIs were created to do more than entertain - they're intended to complete a quest left by park founder Walt Disney himself; a quest that will, if successful, stop the gradual encroachment of the park's villains into the real world. (Yes, Victoria, there is a Maleficent, and she doesn't like you!) Known as the Overtakers, the villains are working on a plot to take over the park - and then the world. And for Finn Whitman and his fellow DHIs solving Walt's puzzle just became a matter of life and death.It's a bit predictable and the whole stuck-in-the-game thing has been done better, but it wasn't bad.
  • (5/5)
    Five Children are picked to become guides for Disney World using a new technology called DHI, which stands for Disney Host Interactive or Daylight Hologram Imaging. This new technology, however, has a glitch. The five kids are transported in their hologram form to the Theme park after they fall asleep. There they meet a man named Wayne, who tells them the park is in great danger from an evil witch and the Overtakers. With many familiar Disney characters, Disney After Dark has many intriguing moments and makes you wonder what really happens after Disney World closes.
  • (4/5)
    The cool story line alone earns this novel 4 stars out of 5 - who wouldn't want to be in a Disney park after dark? Battling the villains and witches might be hard work but I can think of way worse jobs. Finn and his friends find themselves in the middle of the action but pull through in the end. This novel by Ridley Pearson is 324 pages of fun and suspense told from 13 year old Finn's perspective. The ending allows for a sequel - something fans of this book will appreciate.
  • (5/5)
    In the Kingdom Keepers, Finn Whitman and four other teens are chosen to become DHI, which stands for Disney Host Interactive and it also stands for Daylight Hologram Imaging. They first think that it is going to be cool, but when they re
  • (5/5)
    this book is another one of my favorites because the characters grow through out the story and become heroes and save all things Disney! ha ha. but this book is just like your in Disney fighting animatronics and other Disney characters and if you haven't read this book and you love disney as much as me you will definetly love this book.
  • (5/5)
    Great book! I'm a fan of Disney, but have never been to Disney World. Even though I didn't know much about Disney World the book described it very well. I now want to visit Disney World to see the all of what was described in the book. I would recommend this book! I look forward to reading the rest of the series!