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Scarlet: The Lunar Chronicles

Scarlet: The Lunar Chronicles

Scritto da Marissa Meyer

Narrato da Rebecca Soler


Scarlet: The Lunar Chronicles

Scritto da Marissa Meyer

Narrato da Rebecca Soler

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (228 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
11 ore
Pubblicato:
Feb 5, 2013
ISBN:
9781427229656
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Cinder, the cyborg mechanic, returns. She's trying to break out of prison—even though if she succeeds, she'll be the Commonwealth's most wanted fugitive. Halfway around the world, Scarlet Benoit's grandmother is missing. It turns out there are many things Scarlet doesn't know about her grandmother or the grave danger she has lived in her whole life.

When Scarlet encounters Wolf, a street fighter who may have information as to her grandmother's whereabouts, she is loath to trust this stranger, but is inexplicably drawn to him, and he to her. As Scarlet and Wolf unravel one mystery, they encounter another when they meet Cinder. Now, all of them must stay one step ahead of the vicious Lunar Queen Levana, who will do anything for the handsome Prince Kai to become her husband, her king, her prisoner.

A Macmillan Audio production.

Pubblicato:
Feb 5, 2013
ISBN:
9781427229656
Formato:
Audiolibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Marissa Meyer is the #1 New York Times–bestselling author of the Renegades Trilogy, The Lunar Chronicles series, the Wires and Nerve graphic novels, and The Lunar Chronicles Coloring Book. Her first standalone novel, Heartless, was also a #1 New York Times bestseller. Marissa created and hosts a podcast called The Happy Writer. She lives in Tacoma, Washington, with her husband and their two daughters.


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4.4
228 valutazioni / 180 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    This is the second book in the Lunar Chronicles series. Now fantasy/scifi is not usually my cup of tea, but I am really enjoying this series.

    Scarlet is the retelling of Little Red Riding Hood, complete with a grandmere who is taken prisoner by wolves, Wolf and bad guy turned good guy, turned bad guy, turned good guy. Not sure how this will end up, but right now he seems to be a good guy in love with Scarlet. This series has a little of everything, cyborgs, droids, spaceships, mind control, genetically mutated super warriors that look and act like wolves, and a lot more science fiction stuff. There is also a war looming between Earth and the Lunars (the moon).

    I loved the way that a large part of the book is set around character building. We really get to know the characters, what makes them tick, their families, their strengths etc. Some of the characters from Cinder did not have a very large role in this story, but they were still around for plot continuity and building.

    Of course this is a series, so it should come as no surprise that there is no conclusion to the story. It leaves us hanging, but being as I came late to the party, the next book is already out so I can just keep reading. This book sets up Cinder in the role of Princess who will save the worlds, both Earth and the Moon. We are left with a genuine sense of hope for what's to come as Cinder lays her plan with the help of her new friends.
  • (4/5)
    This was a good book.
  • (4/5)
    I have to say I am quite enjoying this series. Marissa Meyer has cleverly retold another fairy tale (Little Red Riding Hood) once again blending it with fantasy/sci fi. Although "Scarlet" was a little slow in some places, the story came to a good ending, leaving the reader wanting more. Looking forward to the next instalment of "The Lunar Chronicles".
  • (5/5)
    Book 2 introduces a while new set of character and builds the characters from Cinder with Scarlet and Wolf making it a can't wait for book 3!
  • (3/5)
    Loosely based on Little Red Riding Hood, Scarlet’s story starts as she searches for her missing grandmother. Along the way, she meets the dark and handsome street fighter Wolf who might be able to help her, if she can trust him. We also learn a little more about Cinder’s escape and how she might be connected to Scarlet’s grandmother.

    Like Cinder, Scarlet is inspired by a fairy tale but isn’t similar enough to be called a re-telling. If you’re particularly excited for a more faithful re-telling, that might be disappointing. However, I enjoyed the originality of the world Meyer created and thought the similarities to Red Riding Hood added an extra layer of interest. The characters’ personalities are also unique and not exactly what you might expect from the fairy tale.

    Although the characters and world were unique and original, the plot was less so. It was both predictable and light on action that moved the story forward. The writing, the world building, the characters were all good in the same way Cinder was good. Sadly, the lack of action made this feel like a let down, just more of the same, instead of an exciting extension to the series.

    This review first published on Doing Dewey.
  • (5/5)
    I absolutely loved the first book, Cinder, so I thought that the next book in the series would be equally awesome. I was right. It was packed full of action, which I love, introduced new characters, I also love that when it's done properly, and I couldn't put it down. In fact, since I'm writing this review a little late, (finished it last night) I couldn't get enough of the series and started to read the next book, Cress. Cinder has another epic journey about who she really is, and this time, so does Scarlet. I love that these books play on those old stories, this one is Red Riding Hood, without actually being like them. They're just a little bit like them. If that makes sense, haha. Anyways. I loved this book. I couldn't put it down. I think I covered that already. The characters really grew, and I really liked the re-introduction of Iko as Thorne's ship, I missed Cinder having someone to almost relate to. I liked her having an android friend. Thorne was an awesome character, he really livened up the story with his antics. Scarlet was quiet and skittish at first, but she really grew into a different character, in a good way. She came out of her shell and started acting like someone who really fit into the book. I was very suspicious of Wolf at first, but I came to love him as much as the other characters. The story kept me intrigued, and I didn't suspect most of the sudden curves it took, which is always awesome. I think that about covered this book. Thanks for reading! Here's a link. Click it if you dare, ;D (psssst. It's just my blog.)radioactivebookreviews.wordpress.com
  • (3/5)
    This started off interesting, then it took me some time to get into it. I just did not want to pick it up for some reason. I am glad that the last half picked back up and held my attention. I would give the last 100 pages 4 stars!I liked the story, but prefer the parts with Cinder and Kai! I honestly just want to see their reunion! And the happily ever after! I know, lame! But, I love a good romance. I think I will take a break before I grab for the next book, but I will for sure continue the series.
  • (5/5)
    I think this book was even better than Cinder. Very fast paced. Great characters. Loved how the new character tied in with the plot of book 1.
  • (3/5)
    This is the third book of the series. The writting is getting better and I enjoyed the progress of the story line. However, there are some teenager agnst and stupidity that I am annoyed and frustrated.
  • (3/5)
    3.5 - I did like Cinder better than Scarlet. I have yet to read Book 3, Cress, but am still going to continue with series. Storyline is great!
  • (4/5)
    This was a strong second outing for the Lunar Chronicles. It had more surprises than the first book. It was also a bit darker in tone.I started this book anxious to find out what would happen next to Cinder, but she wasn't featured in the first few chapters. However, I soon found myself captivated by the new characters, and then it was equally hard leaving them behind to catch up on Cinder.Besides the great characters, another strong point was the setting. New Beijing felt real in the first book, and the author brought France, both rural and Paris, to life here while still giving it a completely different feel from New Beijing.There was one part that left me confused as if I'd missed something, but other than that I really enjoyed this and look forward to book three.
  • (4/5)
    this was a great follow up to Cincer. I actually thought is was quite a bit better than the first with better character development and more twists and turns
  • (5/5)
    Wow, absolutely fabulous! Keep 'em coming!

    Scarlet Benoit is a farm girl, but she wasn't always. She used to live in Paris, now she lives in rieux. One day her grandmother disappears, scarlet knows she didn't run off, but the police don't agree. She will stop at nothing to find her grandma.

    This book was devoured in one and a half sittings. I tried to make it last, really, I did! It was just too good to stop reading. The imagery was on point, and the writing style as always had wonderful flow. Marissa Meyer is swiftly taking up the 2015 favorite author slot for me.
  • (4/5)
    I know that Scarlet was supposed to be about Scarlet and her story, but Thorne and Cinder's dorky friendship made this book!I loved Cinder> in this book and I have a feeling that she will come even further in her character development in the next two books."Once, people had looked at her with revulsion. Now, people were terrified of her.She wasn't sure which was worse.She wanted to scream to the world that it wasn't her fault she was this way. She'd had nothing to do with it."Thorne is my favorite. I want to give him all the hugs because he is so precious.I enjoyed Scarlet a lot. I really liked her farm girl wibe - all about peace, quiet and growing vegetables."Who knows? tomorrow you might learn about broccoli. By next week, you could know the difference between summer squash and zucchini."Her aggressive side was also quite enjoyable. But most important thing about Scarlet is that she gives everybody a chance. She is not quick to judge and is not afraid to forgive and trust somebody again. I especially loved how she was defending Cinder, without even knowing her."People are so quick to accuse and criticize, but they don't know what she's been through or what led her to do the things she did. Do we even know for sure that she did anything?"Normally a guy like Wolf would have swept me off my feet, but for some reason he was just okay for me. Maybe because of the lies he kept telling Scarlet. Or maybe he just felt too robotic and monotone (granted that is explainable by him being under the thaumaturge's power) but still.I wasn't too thrilled about their insta-love, but at least Scarlet herself questioned it too. I loved the dynamic Scarlet and Wolf had though, their conversations were awesome:"You'll want to aim for the head. That usually makes a fatal shot. Or, if you're feeling shaky, the torso. It's a larger target""Your head looks pretty big from here."There was an obnoxious overuse of words "gulp" , "glare" and "prone", but I will let it slide, because it was so enjoyable. I cannot wait to dig into Cress, as am I really enjoying this series.
  • (4/5)
    Fairy tale meets science fiction. [Scarlet] follows where [Cinder] left off and introduces us to a new cast of characters to go with the ones we already love. Cinder is in prison after being captured after the ball and is facing being shipped back to Luna where the Queen plans to have her executed.Scarlet's Grandmother is missing and the authorities are not investigating the disappearance. Scarlet knows that her grandmother wouldn't just leave her without saying a word and it's a very bad sign that her identity chip has been removed. While working in the city Scarlet comes across a street fighter named Wolf and, well, you know how the fairy tale goes ...I love how Meyer takes the basic concept of the fairy tales and tells her version with many twists and turns.I am looking forward to the next instalment!
  • (4/5)
    Really good book. I'm excited for the next one to come out.
  • (4/5)
    Scarlet is the second book in The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer. I think my biggest complaint on this one is the plot is highly predictable, which might be a downside to following the fairy tale a little too closely. Luckily Scarlet is just so darn entertaining and great fun to read that I mostly didn't mind. There will be some spoilers for both books.The story picks up immediately where book one leaves off. The biggest and only news story is about the disaster at the Commonwealth's yearly ball. Could that have gone any worse? Determined not to be handed over to Queen Levana, Cinder works to break herself out of prison even knowing it will make her the most wanted fugitive on the planet. In France, Scarlet Benoit could care less about what's on the news. Her grandmother has gone missing and the police refuse to help citing evidence that grandma is an obvious "runaway". Scarlet takes it upon herself to find out what's going on as her grandmother would never run away and leave the farm unattended. When Scarlet encounters Wolf, a street fighter who may have information about granny's whereabouts, even knowing it's a bad idea and he shouldn't be trusted she enlists his help in the search. Scarlet must find out what's happened to her grandmother through any means necessary.I enjoy how Meyer re-imagines the classic fairy tale characters. Scarlet, aka Red Riding Hood, is quite a fun. With red hair and dressed in a red hoodie, she's brash, firey and won't take no for an answer when it comes to finding her family. She is quite different from our initial introduction to Cinder, who was almost meek in comparison. Like Cinder, she's not a "waiting for my prince to come" type, instead preferring to be proactive about the situation. There's a lot of girl power in these books. Wolf is exactly who I expected he would be with the foreshadowing of the monster army on the Lunars are creating from book one. Combine this with knowledge of the original fairy tale and this is where the story becomes predictable. Of course he's lying to Scarlet, of course he knows a lot more than he says and of course Scarlet is the true mission objective. And obviously he's smoking hot and going to be Scarlet's love interest because this is YA. Over in Cinder's story line, we're introduced to Captain Carswell Thorne, who reminded me a lot of Zaphod Beeblebrox from Hitchhiker's Guide. He's in prison for desertion from the American military and for stealing a military ship in the process, his ego is so large it can barely fit in the same room and he's a bit of womanizer. But he's fun and a good foil for Cinder. And naturally he's going to help Cinder so they can both escape. Poor Kai, still woefully unprepared for being Emperor of the Commonwealth and dealing with the political situation. And I still love Iko!We are also given a bit more insight into the world Meyer has created. This version of France a blend of old-world and futuristic. Folks go to the local tavern for a drink, watch entertainment on vid feeds and vegetables from the farm are delivered on space ships. It's still not as much depth as I'd like but it does add a little more dimension. As I mentioned at the start the book has it's flaws with the predictability of the plot being the main one. Being a YA story there are YA tropes. Scarlet and Wolf's relationship, while sweet in its way, is basically insta-love. Scarlet makes some bad decisions when it comes to trusting Wolf even when she knows she shouldn't. The characters also frustrated me with the fact that even after the big reveal from granny that they still couldn't figure out who Cinder is without being explicitly told so. Still, the story remains engaging and highly entertaining. The plot is fast paced and there is a lot of action at the end. I'm looking forward to see how Meyer re-imagines Rapunzel.
  • (3/5)
    So far this fairytale retelling is just...meh. I don't love it or hate it. It's just there. I'll read Cress and Winter because I've got to know how they eventually take out Levana. Can't stand her.
  • (4/5)
    Why, why, WHY does every single heroine in YA lit need a guy? A guy to back her up, a guy for her to pair up with, a guy to lead her, a guy to save her? I thought this was supposed to be offering up NEW twists in classic fairy tales. So fucking lame.
  • (3/5)
    I've had this on my TBR list for too long and one of my goals for 2015 is to pare down my copious e-books. I'm glad I've read this one and it was a quick read but that's also a little of what made it a 3.5 versus a 4 star read for me. Perhaps I'm expecting more than I should but I quite enjoyed Cinder and Scarlet was okay but felt a bit flat. I expected more from the world-building but I have to admit that I still haven't a very clear idea of how the world is in the state it's in for our characters. Also, the writing seemed so... simple and in a way that kind of annoyed me. Perhaps the writing style was the same in Cinder (it's been quite a while since I've read that) but it really bothered me here. I know it's a YA series but this still felt too basic in writing style. I do think the fairytale re-imagining makes this worth reading no matter what though and that's likely what will make me read Cress (I also have that on my reader so I should read my money's worth anyway). I'd definitely recommend this for fans of the series and those with an interest in re-imagined stories.
  • (5/5)
    even better than Cinder . . . moving right along to book three . . .
  • (4/5)
    This book is the second book of the Lunar series. It is about a girl named Scarlet who's Grandmother wen't missing. Then she meet's a street fighter who may have information on her grandmothers whereabouts. He takes her to Paris where a gang has her Grandmother captive. There they meet Cinder the missing Lunar princess. After meeting her she find's her Grandmother is dead. She ends up going with Cinder to stop the Lunar Queen and get revenge for Her dead Grandmother.I gave this book 4 stares because it was very interesting. I enjoyed it's humor and action. I really liked the back storys and the discovery the characters made.
  • (5/5)
    I thought is was slow at the beginning, when Cinder came into play, it slowly sped up and then took off like a bandit. Really enjoyed this one. It just keeps getting better.
  • (4/5)
    This series continues to simultaneously defy my expectations while also having some parts that are a bit predictable, given the YA format.Red Riding Hood in a futuristic France. The missing grandmother. The big bad wolves. The granddaughter in red, who is lovely and spunky and oh-so-determined to help her grandma.Cinder's tale also continues from book one as she follows Dr. Erland's advice, causing ripples around the world. The two storylines eventually come together and I could not put it down from that point on.Given that each volume in this series calls upon a different fairy tale, I expected there to be more resolution at the end of each book, rather than the ongoing story ark across all of them. It's making me glad I started reading after all four had been published.
  • (3/5)
    Okay story. The story felt half finished.Scarlet and Wolf are introduced, but the reason for their addition is still unknown. Don't get me wrong, their story is nice but they really aren't support characters yet.
  • (3/5)
    Sweet little play on some fairy tales. Pretty interesting. I'll definitely finish the series.
  • (4/5)
    Why did I read Scarlet?
    Earlier this year I was surprised to discover that I actually enjoyed reading a futuristic adaptation of Cinderella where Cinderella is a cyborg. What a weird sentence. I was, and am, thrilled that this is a series that isn't just incorporating one fairy tale but many! Dream come true! Honestly, I could not wait to see how the author could weave in the story of Little Read Riding Hood with Cinderella and I'm so excited to see how more familiar favorites are incorporated into this world!

    Was this a good followup to Cinder?
    I didn't quite devour this book like I did with Cinder. I do, however, think that it is a great followup. Many of the questions I had at the end of Cinder were answered and enough happens in the plot of Scarlet to leave me with more questions thereby increasing my interest in reading Cress. I would say that is a good indication that Scarlet is a good followup.

    What did I think about the new characters introduced?
    In this installment we are introduced to a gang that makes real gangs look not quite as frightening. They give a whole new meaning to the Big Bad Wolf featured in Little Red Riding Hood. I really liked that aspect of the tale and found myself LOVING Wolf although I refuse to accept that his real name is Ze'ev. Is it just me or is that name terrible?!

    I'll be honest I had some issues with Scarlet. She seems to contradict herself throughout the novel. She is super judgmental of Wolf and then goes on to say that she likes to hear both sides of the story which is why she isn't judging Cinder. . . yada, yada, yada. I didn't dig that and I'm really hoping that I start to like her more and she is developed more as a character.

    I really loved Captain Thorne! He provided comic relief in what could have been a much more tense situation.

    Will I read Cress?
    Duh.
  • (4/5)
    Love the spin Meyers gives to classic fairy tales in this series.
  • (5/5)
    Scarlet is the second installment of the science fiction fairytale series, the Lunar Chronicles. In this book, Scarlet Bennoit hunts for her missing grandmother and enlists the help of a peculiar man with oddly sharp teeth who goes by Wolf. Together Wolf and Scarlet travel across the French countryside on the heels of a dangerous gang responsible for Scarlet's grandmother's disappearance.I'm so behind on book reviews.... Scarlet exceeds its predecessor, Cinder, in extraordinary ways. Typically, the sequel of any story pales in comparison with the first novel, but it's the exact opposite with Marissa Meyer. The characters are compelling, interesting, and realistic. Being a redhead myself, I throughly enjoyed Scarlet's personality and temper that comes with candle hair. The fact that she throws tomatoes against a wall when she's angry just makes me love her all the more, the mental image just strangely satisfying for me. Then there's Wolf, the mysterious man who has a thing for farm tomatoes and wrestling, yet feels some obligation to help an angry French girl in locating her lost grandma.This story, like Cinder, follows a popular fairy tale from the Grimms. If the red hair and red hoodie worn by the main character isn't a dead giveaway, then Wolf's name surely is. Yes, this is Red Riding Hood in Space. With a gun. And an attitude. Seeing an all new story from Meyer, and yet still getting the perfect parallels from the original story, was such a satisfying read. By chapter 48, I was throwing my head back and laughing at the climatic turn of events. Absolutely wonderful.Things to Watch Out For:Romance: a couple kisses passionately a couple of times; romance between charactersLanguage: NA (that I can remember. At the most, the use of the word d*mn once.)Violence: somewhat graphic scenes where multiple named and unnamed characters are slaughtered; blood is a key factor in some of the violence scenes; a character is mind controlled to take a bullet for another character; wolf-like characters attack and mutilate charactersDrugs: NANudity: a naked lady is said to be painted on the side of a space ship; some comments by men in a bar at the beginning about a womanOther: NA
  • (2/5)
    This second book of The Lunar Chronicles was okay but not as good as the first. Or maybe it was just as good but my expectations were higher after unexpectedly enjoying the first novel. The story in this one felt scattered. The different points of view weren't distinct enough to keep the switch from being confusing. I felt annoyed that both powerful female characters got paired up with men to complete their tasks. Not that there's anything wrong with men and certainly nothing wrong with men helping out, I was just hoping for a more comprehensive flip of the fairy tale model.I do admit, I like the way that the Big Scene was handled. The men were unable to help and three female characters got the job done on their own. I also appreciate that the male characters can't be trusted entirely. This speaks to the constant awareness that women have of being physically smaller than men, the awareness that the person they're trusting could hurt them if they wanted to. Or maybe I'm projecting. As a petite woman, in every venture outside and every time an electrician or painter or plumber does work at my house, I am quite aware of my size in relation to other people. I'm rarely outright scared, but I'm always aware that I'm the smaller mammal.And I felt really irritated by Meyer's use of "list" as a transitive verb. Three times people "listed" their heads. Dude, just say "tilted" or even "inclined," if you want to sound fancier. "Listed" is awkward and takes a reader out of the story because she's not expecting the verb to be used that way. I'm not even sure it should be used this way. You could say something lists something else in the sense that one thing causes the other thing to list, but the only way I could see this working on someone's head is if they're wearing one really heavy earring.Even though I didn't enjoy this novel quite as much as I did Cinder, it was a quick, fun read, and I enjoyed it enough to want to see what happens in the next book in the series.