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Make Way for Ducklings

Make Way for Ducklings

Scritto da Robert McCloskey

Narrato da Owen Jordan


Make Way for Ducklings

Scritto da Robert McCloskey

Narrato da Owen Jordan

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (94 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
10 minuti
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1955
ISBN:
9780545258265
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

In this timeless tale of family life, Mr. & Mrs. Mallard find the perfect spot to raise their young in Boston's Public Garden.
Pubblicato:
Jan 1, 1955
ISBN:
9780545258265
Formato:
Audiolibro


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4.5
94 valutazioni / 68 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    Mrs. Mallard was sure that the pond in the Boston Public Gardens would be a perfect place for her and her eight ducklings to live. The problem was how to get them there through the busy streets of Boston. But with a little help from the Boston police, Mrs. Mallard and Jack, Kack, Lack, Nack, Ouack, Pack, and Quack arrive safely at their new home.
  • (5/5)
    Mr. and Mrs. Mallard are searching for their new home: what place will be safe enough for their new ducklings? As they travel to different places, they encounter new dangers, especially in the city, where they determine that this is not an acceptable place to raise their babies. Finally they find a safe place to raise their ducklings, and Mrs. Mallard teaches her babies to swim and dive.
  • (3/5)
    Honestly, I am not sure that I relate to this story. Perhaps it was over-hyped in my mind, but I don't understand why it is so well loved by others. It is a just fine story, but I wouldn't recommend it to other people. I come from a background as a zooligist, and I spend a lot of time in nature with its denizens. I am a total softy when it comes to animals. I save turtles (only moving them in the direction they are facing) and always wish every animal well when I see. There's just this disconnect between the anthropomorphism of the ducks and them moving back to the public park which was too dangerous for babies while they are still babies. It makes a good story, I guess... unless you actually think about it.
  • (2/5)
    Illustrations are beautiful. A classic. Not very engaging, lacking coherent plot, and a little too long for story time.
  • (5/5)
    I remember this book as a child but I had never read this book on my own. It has great illustrations. It would be a great book to read as a read aloud to younger children. Also to have in the classroom to have children look over on their own. Since the illustrations are different than most books. It gives children a different artistic perspective.
  • (3/5)
    awh fine. Its super cute. Mr. Mallard is an asshole, though.
  • (4/5)
    This is a cute story of a duck family's journey as they search for the perfect place to raise a family. The illustrations are black and white, but help tell the story and make it believable. I like the repetition in the book of using the names of the ducklings over and over again.
  • (5/5)
    Make Way for Ducklings juxtaposes the whimsy of pencil drawings with the hustle and bustle of the city as mama and papa duck search for a place to call home, befriending police officers and children to create a traditionally picturesque scene inside a less traditionally picturesque setting. It is the winner of the 1942 Caldecott Medal.
  • (4/5)
    We rode the swan boats in Boston last weekend. All the while, I was thinking of this book and of E.B. White's The Trumpet of the Swan.

    Then today we were killing time in the book store while I had some work done on the car, and I found (and bought) a lovely hardcover edition of Make Way for Ducklings. My husband is reading it to the kids as I type. I read it to my daughter several years ago, and we both enjoyed it (as we did s0 many other of McCloskey's books, especially Blueberries for Sal). It makes the story even better having seen so recently the sights depicted in the book. My kids are thrilled.

    Aside from the names of the ducklings (Ouack?), I enjoy this book quite a lot. The writing is a pleasure, the story is a classic, and the illustrations are fabulous.
  • (3/5)
    This book feels in many ways like it is lacking in depth to me. It has some good themes such as family and maturity but the story doesn't seem to focus on anything significant. A mother duck feels like her ducklings would not fair in the hustle and bustle of city life so she hatches them on the outside of town. After they are born, they go through a harrowing journey through the city to get to the park where they live happily. Overall, I think the book is just a fun little jaunt that isn't unbelievably captivating. I also didn't like the complete lack of involvement in the ducklings lives by Mr. Mallard it felt like the book was reflecting the time period it was created in and gave the father duck an aloof nature that wasn't entirely necessary. This book also felt longer than it needed to be. Granted the illustrations were awesome, I just wish more attention was paid to the story.
  • (4/5)
    not crazy about animals who talk and have human feelings,liked the drawings.the 20th century children's book treasury
  • (5/5)
    The story begins with two ducks, the Mallards, looking for a place to raise their family. They travel all over the city looking for places to live that do not have any turtles or foxes. After finding a small island, the ducklings are born, and the father decides to look around the area. While away, Mrs. Mallard raises her ducklings and prepares them for the day they journey to the park to meet Mr. Mallard. As she walks her family to the park, the policeman who usually fed the Mallard peanuts alerted the police in order to block traffic so the ducks could pass, and head to their new home in the park.
  • (3/5)
    This Caldecott Award winning book tells a tale about Mr. and Mrs. Mallard trying to find a suitable home for their little ducklings. A friendly police officer helps the family traverse the dangerous Boston streets. Simple but rich drawings add much depth to the story.
  • (5/5)
    Very beautiful pictures- old book.
  • (5/5)
    A charming story for a mother's care for her children, and a city that joins in protecting a family on the way to a new home. Great read aloud, and playful language that children love to hear again and again.
  • (4/5)
    The drawings of ducks are great. I think perhaps another story is hiding here. Like, what the hell was Mr. Mallard doing, while Mrs. Mallard was training all the ducklings. Does he work at Langley? Was he "exploring" the parts of the river that the loons occupied? Sounds like a plot line from Mad Men really.
  • (5/5)
    This classic book is a special book to read aloud to kids who will love counting the little ducklings and following the story to make sure they arrive safely to the Public Garden. This book helps build up vocabulary with words like mallard, flapped, polite, proud, delighted, waddled, dither, hatched, responsibility, opposite and promised.
  • (5/5)
    Great read aloud book!
  • (5/5)
    This story was one of my favorites when I was younger. I loved reading about Mr. and Mrs. Mallard raising a family of ducklings and deciding the best place to raise their family. Mrs. Mallard knew right away that raising their ducklings in the Boston Public Garden with many people on swan boats throwing peanuts was somewhere they would go later on but no with the little ducklings. So, they head off to a quiet island in the Charles River to raise the little ones until they are old enough to explore the Public Garden following in a row being their parents.
  • (3/5)
    A beautiful story of Mr. and Mrs. Mallard, two young ducks in search of a good place to raise a family. Upon finding Boston with its parks and willing people to feed them, the Mallard family settles down. After learning how to survive around bicycles and anything else with wheels and where to find peanuts they settle down in the Charles River. Eight ducklings later, Mr. Mallard goes off to explore. Mrs. Mallard shows herself to be a competent mother. Once the young ones are ready, the mom and babies embark on an adventure to meet the father in the park. Traffic becomes a problem until the entire community becomes involved. This book has been a favorite for generations of beginning readers. I have read this book many, many times as a young person and even today this masterpiece resonates deeply within me. The combination of drawing and artistic use of words, along with real locations make this book attractive to young and old alike. The illustrations are carefully rendered with attention to detail, each duckling is imbued with its own personality. The story moves rapidly and has a happy ending that is completely satisfying. I believe this story would be useful in class to teach about wildlife, especially ducks. This book also would be useful to help with phonics, the ducklings names could let the class brainstorm about other rhyming words. This story would also be a good time to relate how to be safe in traffic, watching both ways before crossing the street.
  • (5/5)
    Truly a classic, but a bit long for storytime.
  • (5/5)
    Love love love this book! The story is great for children and also uses the correct ornithological terms too which makes a wild bird lover happy.
  • (3/5)
    This book is about a family of ducks. Before the ducklings arrive, the father and mother duck search for a place to make their home. They finally do and the ducklings are hatched. Father duck leaves to try to find a better home for his family and tells mother duck to bring the ducklings and meet him somewhere. As the rest of the family is on their way to meet father duck, they go through the town causing traffic to stop and "make way for the ducklings".
  • (5/5)
    I love love love love this book. I can't wait to have children and read it to them!
  • (5/5)
    Make Way for Ducklings is a beautiful, heart-warming story. It tells of duck parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mallard, finding a place to raise their ducklings. They find a place to live on an in the river, but as they get older, Mrs. Mallard begins to lead them through the streets of Boston. Not only is this a lovely story, but the pictures are spectacular. There is no question as to why it won the Caldecott Medal.This is one of my favorite children's books. I have it in my personal library and can't imagine it not being part of a child's early literature experience.I think this could be used in the classroom as a science lesson about ducks and how they raise their ducklings. Mostly, I would just use it to read aloud and expose the students to good, quality literature.
  • (5/5)
    Make Way for Ducklings by Robert McCloskeyThis Caldecott winner is about a mother and father duck, named Mr. and Mrs. Mallard, looking for a place to raise their ducklings in the big city. They look in various places and find an island in the middle of the river. Once the ducklings learn to walk in line, Mrs. Mallard takes them through the streets of Boston to the public park. The streets are very dangerous for the duckling, but they make it through with the help of a police man.I love this story. It takes me back to childhood because my mother used to read this story to me. I love the creativity of the picture and the author. It shows what challenges wild life can encounter when they live in a city.I would use this story with lower elementary students. I read the story and then have a discussion on what they would do if they were an animal in the big city. I would then have them draw me a picture of what animal they would be and show a challenge that animal would meet. I would have them write a sentence about it or write the sentence for them if they cannot write yet.
  • (3/5)
    A story about a family of ducklings trying to meet father duck on the other side of the pond. Friendly humans help the ducks make it to the pond safely
  • (4/5)
    Beautiful book to read to young children with enthralling illustrations well worthy of the Caldecott Medal won.
  • (3/5)
    Make Ways for Duckling is about a husband and wife duck couple that is looking for the perfect place to call home and to raise a family of ducklings. They fly from place to place in search of the right place to lay their eggs. Once the ducklings were old enough and trained they set off to look for the place to spend forever with.I thought it was a good book but I think it would be better to read it to a first grade class or a kindergarten class. My son, who is 3, was not able to stay interested. I liked the pictures, however, I am more of a colored picture kinda of person. Though I do think the pictures got the point across and added to the story beautifully.I would have the class draw pictures of what their idea place would be to live if they were a duck. I would also have them write a one page story about the place they call home and what makes them classify that as home.
  • (5/5)
    I love this book!! the illustrations are in black and white which makes this book unique. This book has wonderful language and vocabulary for small children.