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Judy Moody Gets Famous

Judy Moody Gets Famous

Scritto da Megan McDonald

Narrato da Barbara Rosenblat


Judy Moody Gets Famous

Scritto da Megan McDonald

Narrato da Barbara Rosenblat

valutazioni:
4/5 (25 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
1 ora
Pubblicato:
Jun 10, 2011
ISBN:
9781455828203
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

Fans of Judy Moody already know that Judy has a mood for every occasion-and this time Judy is in a jealous mood. Jealous of classmate Jessica Finch, that is, who gets her picture on the front page of the newspaper. When Judy sets off in pursuit of her own fame and happiness, watch out! She's so determined, she just might find it, or she might merely become more INFAMOUS than ever. Her latest adventures are sure to put listeners in a very Judy Moody mood!

Pubblicato:
Jun 10, 2011
ISBN:
9781455828203
Formato:
Audiolibro

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25 valutazioni / 11 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    Feisty third-grader Judy Moody returns in this second chapter-book devoted to her adventures, discovering to her chagrin that she is the least famous member of the Moody household - unlike her younger brother, Stink, she has nothing to put on the refrigerator "Moody Hall of Fame" - and of Mr. Todd's class at school. How can Judy become famous? By discovering a cherry-pit from George Washington's famous cherry tree? By breaking a record in the Guinness Book of World Records? By entering her cat Mouse in a pet contest? Or by doing something completely unexpected...?I enjoyed this follow-up to the first Judy Moody book, once again finding the eponymous young heroine an engaging blend of spunky rebel and essentially good-hearted young girl. It was interesting that when Judy eventually does get her fifteen minutes of fame, it is for something she does anonymously, to benefit others. I appreciated that, and I also appreciated Judy's decision to confess to Mr. Todd that she was the one responsible for the worm incident in class, not her rival Jessica. With an amusing story, an appealing cast of characters, and entertaining illustrations, this series is a great pick for beginning chapter-book readers in the market for girl characters with... character.
  • (4/5)
    Genre: Realistic FictionReview: This is an example of realistic fiction because it is a story that could happen in real life but the characters are not real. The characters are made out to be believable, however, the events that took place are not real.Age Appropriateness: Intermediate
  • (1/5)
    i like this book but the book was to boring sorry but that not the problem
  • (4/5)
    Another cute Judy Book. This one is as good as the first although we aren't past the first half yet. I want to get back to this one!!
  • (3/5)
    Judy Moody is back for more school adventures - one of Judy's classmates has become famous for winning a spelling bee and soon Judy's got a new goal: Get Famous! Of course, none of Judy's plans for getting famous work out exactly like she thinks they will, but there's tons of fun to be had along the way. Judy Moody is great for readers who are ready for their first chapter books and who like a good laugh.
  • (4/5)
    This realistic fiction is about a third grade girl, Judy, who wants to be famous for something. Judy get jealous because all of the people around her have won awards, Jessica for the spelling bee, even her little brother has won an award. Judy enters her cat into a show so that she could win something and be in the paper. However, this plan goes awry when Judy's cat jumps out of her arms in the photo. At the hospital Judy discovers that all of the dolls are all broken. She steals them and fixes them and then returns them. The newspaper thanks the mystery person for doing this, and Judy decides to ask for credit, and her parents are very proud of her and put her up on the wall of fame.
  • (4/5)
    This is an adorable book about a third grader Named Judy moody who is jealous of her classmate for winning the spelling, Bee. She and her friends come up with some really cool ideas to help her become famous. One she takes her cat to a pet show and shows off that her cat can make toast. When she got second she had a picture of her elbow in the newspaper. she thought of other ways to brainstorm. While looking at the Guinness book of world records. she decided her and her friends would become the human centipede. During this, she broke her friend's finger. While at the hospital Judy meets a girl who had a heart transplant and was complaining about the dolls and how they are broken. Judy stole the dolls and fixed them up. she sent back the dolls and hoped no one would notice. The next day her story about the dolls was in the newspaper and she was very happy.Use: I would use this as an independent reading book and I would use it as a whole class book and discuss how we could help others in real life just like Judy did in the book.Media: This is a good use of realistic fiction because the book is relatable and all the events could happen in a third grader's life. The way Judy Acts is relatable to most children. there is also a family that is relatable too.
  • (5/5)
    I love how nice it was also l like how Judy was so kind and it was nice to hear
  • (4/5)
    Judy Moody is JEALOUS with a capital J when she finds out she's pretty much the only one she knows that hasn't been in the public's eye. She sets out to become famous, no...INFAMOUS...and in the process learns that sometimes it's the journey that's more important than the notoriety...though she'd still SERIOUSLY like a make up picture because the whole elbow thing, yeah, hard to tell whose it was!


    **copy received for review
  • (3/5)
    Narrated by Barbara Rosenblatt.Jessica Finch gets her picture in the paper after winning a spelling bee and Judy Moody is envious of her fame. Judy wants her moment in the spotlight, too, and she comes up with different ideas to achieve it, from claiming to have a cherry pit once owned by George Washington, to setting a world record as a human centipede (and breaking Frank’s finger in the process). While at the hospital with Frank, Judy discovers a collection of battered dolls in the children’s wing and comes up with a compassionate idea that inadvertently makes her famous, even though in the end no one knows it was her.Jessica Finch gets her picture in the paper after winning a spelling bee and Judy Moody is envious of her fame. Judy wants her moment in the spotlight, too, and she comes up with different ideas to achieve it, from claiming to have a cherry pit once owned by George Washington, to setting a world record as a human centipede (and breaking Frank’s finger in the process). While at the hospital with Frank, Judy discovers a collection of battered dolls in the children’s wing and comes up with a compassionate idea that inadvertently makes her famous, even though in the end no one knows it was her. Rosenblatt narrates with youthful energy and humor that matches Judy’s wacky plans and ambitions. Judy’s emotions, whether outrage or jealousy or happiness, are portrayed vividly.
  • (4/5)
    In my opinion, this is a very fun and engaging book for early-chapter book readers. I liked this book because the author’s language is fitting to the story and the characters in the story, and it is appropriate language for young readers. Judy uses the (invented) word, “famouser” to explain how she felt even more famous than several famous people, including Queen Elizabeth and Superman. While some might criticize the author’s vocabulary choices because a few words are not real words, I liked that the author chose imaginative words; I think it makes the story playful. Additionally, children who read “Judy Moody” books are at an age where they may often unintentionally make up a word, which is okay because they are developing learners. I also liked this book because of the characters, particularly Judy Moody. Judy Moody is a very entertaining character because her moods are unpredictable. The author does an excellent job of portraying Judy as a sassy, silly and spontaneous third grader. The big idea of this book is to teach readers that jealousy is an ugly trait to have.