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The View From Saturday

The View From Saturday

Scritto da E.L. Konigsburg

Narrato da Jenna Lamia e Jan Maxwell


The View From Saturday

Scritto da E.L. Konigsburg

Narrato da Jenna Lamia e Jan Maxwell

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (54 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
4 ore
Pubblicato:
Dec 8, 2009
ISBN:
9780743597142
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

HOW HAD MRS. OLINSKI CHOSEN her sixth-grade Academic Bowl team? She had a number of answers. But were any of them true? How had she really chosen Noah and Nadia and Ethan and Julian? And why did they make such a good team?
It was a surprise to a lot of people when Mrs. Olinski's team won the sixth-grade Academic Bowl contest at Epiphany Middle School. It was an even bigger surprise when they beat the seventh grade and the eighth grade, too. And when they went on to even greater victories, everyone began to ask: How did it happen?
It happened at least partly because Noah had been the best man (quite by accident) at the wedding of Ethan's grandmother and Nadia's grandfather. It happened because Nadia discovered that she could not let a lot of baby turtles die. It happened when Ethan could not let Julian face disaster alone. And it happened because Julian valued something important in himself and saw in the other three something he also valued.
Mrs. Olinski, returning to teaching after having been injured in an automobile accident, found that her Academic Bowl team became her answer to finding confidence and success. What she did not know, at least at first, was that her team knew more than she did the answer to why they had been chosen.
This is a tale about a team, a class, a school, a series of contests and, set in the midst of this, four jewel-like short stories -- one for each of the team members -- that ask questions and demonstrate surprising answers.
Pubblicato:
Dec 8, 2009
ISBN:
9780743597142
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

E.L. Konigsburg is the only author to have won the Newbery Medal and a Newbery Honor in the same year. In 1968, From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler won the Newbery Medal and Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley, and Me, Elizabeth was named a Newbery Honor Book. Almost thirty years later she won the Newbery Medal once again for The View from Saturday. Among her other acclaimed books are Silent to the Bone, The Outcasts of 19 Schuyler Place, and The Mysterious Edge of the Heroic World.

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4.3
54 valutazioni / 55 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    Having read "From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler" by E. L. Konigsburg and finding this book I hoped that this book would be on par with the first. I was not disappointed.Four 6th grade students are brought together to compete against other schools in the sixth-grade championships. Each has their own family story, no two alike, but they come together to become quite the team and go on to trounce the other sixth-grades and move on up to the seventh-grade competition.Along the way they not only hone their knowledge, they also learn about their differences, similarities and create close bonds between themselves.Mrs. Olinski has her own challenges and along with her team learns more about her students and herself.I enjoyed this story as the kids are treated not as adults, but as learners in life. The adults don't talk down to the kids, but rather help them understand and learn to navigate life and the things that happen.Konigsburg has written other books and I do plan and reading more of them.
  • (5/5)
    How does a teacher build the best Academic Bowl team in the history of ever? Mrs. Olinski has many answers to this question, but which answer is the right one? Each of the students on the team has unique skills and knowledge that adds to their overall success. In addition, they have something else in common, something that makes them remarkable.The unique organization of this story adds to the suspense, and also enhances the character development. The first four or five chapters start with a teaser about the Academic Bowl, then shift to a short story about each individual on the Bowl team. Once the whole team is introduced, the chapters are shorter, but still start with the ongoing bit by bit feed about the Bowl.
  • (5/5)
    I have mixed feelings about this book. Personally, I loved it, I could really relate to it, and I thought it was very well written. Conversely, this is one of those Newbery winners that probably appeals to adults more than children.This book received the Newbery in 1997, the year my son started sixth grade. He was in an advanced program and on the math team. I was a bit of a nerd myself at that age (Who am I kidding? I’m STILL a nerd), winning the science fair and the spelling bee. I could SO relate to the Academic Bowl team in this story (from page 148, “Here were four kids who could speak in complete sentences without a single you-know as filler”). I think my son and his classmates could have as well.Nevertheless, even though its reading level is grade 4-5, the structure of the book will be daunting for many even-older readers, because it’s not linear and it is not plot-driven. E. L. (Elaine Lobl) Konigsburg ties together the first-person narratives of the four sixth-grade Academic Bowl team members (who call themselves "The Souls"), Noah, Nadia, Ethan, and Julian (who are interconnected in other ways), with the third-person limited story of their coach and teacher, the wheelchair-bound widow Mrs. Olinski, and an overall third-person omniscient tale of the team’s progress in Academic Bowl competition.
  • (3/5)
    What a lovely book. Not sentimental, overwrought, or oversimplified, like much of middle grade children's literature. E. L. Konigsburg's writing is sharp and the story is told with the care and cleverness it deserves. I appreciated her treatment of the unique group of pre-pubescent characters through deft perspective shifts and each with his or her own story of personal growth. What I liked most is that she doesn't assume her audience is incapable of rising to the complexity of the narrative and relationships. This isn't dumbed down for children, but instead perhaps, simplified for adults.
  • (4/5)
    Slooooow.... but good.
  • (3/5)
    A book on making friends and bringing children together.
  • (4/5)
    This book takes you on adventure with four children and a school teacher. It talks about their lives and how they met. It teaches youth about friendship, forgiveness and real life situations.
  • (5/5)
    This book appeared on several "recommended" or "award winning" lists I reviewed, but since I knew nothing about it, it took quite awhile for me to finally bring a copy home. Hence, I was unprepared for what I discovered inside, which was nothing short of literary magic. The writing is simply beautiful - not complicated but in no way dumbed down like some children's books I've encountered. The characters are fully fleshed (even the peripheral ones) and sympathetically drawn. I loved the humor and humanity that pervades the entire story. What the author does is the literary equivalent of a five-star, five-course gourmet meal. How I wish there was a sequel - I miss these literary friends already!
  • (3/5)
    Really good book.
  • (4/5)
    this is about Noah going to Connecticut with his grandma to do a letter.
  • (3/5)
    Its an okay book. I didn't expect to see the characters act the way they acted though.
  • (5/5)
    Even though I had read this book before, I couldn't wait to get back in the car to rediscover how each of the characters would be linked to the others. Four exceptional students end up in Mrs. Olinski's sixth grade class - not just exceptional for their varied talents, but for the kindness of their hearts. The story addresses so many issues (divorce, sibling rivalry, bullying, discrimination) but with the lightest of touches.

    Listened to Listening Library CD edition read by six different narrators: Rick Adamson, L. J. Ganser, Agnes Hermann, Aasif Mandvi, Barbara Rosenblat, and Jeff Woodman. Previously read.

    Just a note: I participated in Academic Bowl in junior high and high school and that's likely to have influenced my feelings about this book.
  • (5/5)
    Four 6th grade kids form a unique friendship and make an unlikely team for an academic competition for paraplegic teacher Mrs. Olinski. Together they all learn something about themselves.
  • (4/5)
    The members of Epiphany Middle School's Academic Bowl will surprise you - not only by their intelligence proven by the success of the team but by their compassion and resilience. The book is broken into flashbacks from each of the member's perspective in the journey that lead them to becoming a member of "The Souls," the Academic Bowl team name. They each have an equal part of the story, including their teacher/coach Mrs. Olinski. Readers will feel a connection to each of the members and Mrs. Olinski as they are "underdogs" and will want to root for them. The story will speak to kids who have had to overcome obstacles and wanted to feel like they are a part of something special. Targeted for high 4th grade readers and up.
  • (4/5)
    This story begins at a Middle School Quiz Bowl Challenge in which Noah, Nadia, Ethan and Julian, all sixth graders are competing as a team under the leadership of their homeroom teacher, Mrs. Olinski. Mrs. Olinski is asked how she chose the members for this extremely successful team and she is unable to answer right away. The story then moves into flashbacks of each of the team members, beginning with Noah's presence at a wedding and ending with Julian, the last addition to the team. Each story seems to move seamlessly to the next one when their lives interconnect. Mrs. Olinski's story and that of the Quiz Bowl itself is told intermittently, interspersed between the flashbacks of the four team members. An overriding theme seemed to be the power of friendship and kindness over difficulties and problems which span from typical school bullies to racism to physical disabilities. Konigsberg seemed particularly adept at characterization in this children's story. In fact, the characters and their personas seem to outshine everything else and that is probably by design. I loved seeing how all the characters fit together and formed a whole that was better than the sum of their parts. There is also some interesting symbolism in the book...and fitting for a children's novel, some of it is cleverly explained.
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite books! The view from Saturday tells the story of four very different 6th graders who team up and become friends, with the help of their great teacher, for a chance to beat 7th graders in a academic bowl.
  • (5/5)
    Oh Newbery books, how I love you. Some are better than others, but all of them demonstrate the potential of high quality children's literature. This story is both a Newbery and a book by Konigsburg, who has a cannon of great books for kids, so it was an easy pick. The story is about four children who become friends and compete in an academic decathlon together. Each chapter focuses on one child, and the time line weaves back and forth between the Academic Bowl competition, their pasts, and their present as friends. The children don't fall into stereotypical categories; instead, they are unique individuals with varied backgrounds, and the trait that draws them together is their open mindedness. They are intelligent, and quirky, yet it's not a story about nerds becoming popular, or even the underdogs triumphing, but about the formation of friendship and the discovery of a talent that is uniquely suited to them.It's amazing how crafted these characters are in such a small story. Each has a background, with conflicts, flaws, and success. Noah is a stickler for factual information and data. He spent a summer with his grandparents in their retirement community, where he learned calligraphy and was best man at the wedding of two other elderly folk living there. Nadia is the granddaughter of the groom. Her parents are recently divorced, and this doesn't make it any easier for her to accept that her grandfather decided to remarry, at his age. Ethan, whose grandmother is the bride, is a quiet one. He has always felt overshadowed by his older brother, but thinks he may have found people who see past his wall of silence. Julian is a kid who just can't fit in. His parents are from India, and he spent his earlier years growing up on a cruise ship. Though other kids in the school don't understand him, and he's even picked up a few bullies, he believes that he has found kindred spirits in Noah, Nadia, and Ethan. He draws them together, unwilling and unwitting, into a friendship that becomes stronger than all of their obstacles. Finally, there is Mrs. Olinski, their homeroom teacher. She was paralyzed in an accident many years ago and this is her first year back in the classroom. She is looking for a group of four to represent her homeroom in the decathlon, but did she choose the students, or did they choose her?The tone of the book blends silly and serious as easily as it shifts between characters and time frames. We learn about the back history of each child, which makes them so well suited to the decathlon, we see them meet and face various obstacles through the strength of their friendship, and we watch with bated breath as they compete in the Academic Bowl, the youngest team to ever make it as far as they do. In all their actions they demonstrate love and compassion, and an understanding of the deeper meanings of life. It's not about getting revenge, but showing the other person the better road to follow. It's not about conforming to your peers, but understanding yourself. You know that it is a good book when it can make you alternately laugh out loud and then cry; this book will. Children's literature can be just as powerful as adult literature, and you can read this book for proof.
  • (4/5)
    What a lovely story! When a friendship comes together like the one written about in Ms. Konigsburg's novel, it is a magical thing. I liked seeing how each of the main characters is faced with a decision and ultimately chooses for kindness - and how that choice changes everything for each one of them. I also like that the children in this story are portrayed with respect - not with condescension. They are young, but they are perceptive, and they take responsibility to making things better.
  • (3/5)
    The Souls are four friends who are picked to represent Mrs. Olinsky's class in the quiz tournament. Each of The Souls has a story and the book is made up of vignettes from each of their points of view. The book was kind of about everything and nothing all at once. Very Newbery-ish. I enjoyed the multiple narrators of the audiobook.
  • (5/5)
    The book focuses on four sixth-grade members of an Academic Bowl team, Noah, Nadia, Ethan, and Julian, and their paraplegic teacher, Mrs. Olinski. The narrative alternates between the children's first-person perspective (of past events) and that of Mrs. Olinski (in the present day, at the state finals). Utilizing a format similar to Q & A (the book that formed the basis of Slumdog Millionaire), in which questions at the competition lead to stories about each child's experiences, Konigsburg crafts a humorous and heartfelt tale. As the narrative threads circle around and twine with each other, we get a better and better picture of the group and how they became "The Souls," the adults with whom they interact, and the small New York town, Epiphany, that they call home. Unlike many of the books I've read recently, almost all of the characters are sympathetic (aside from some delightfully skewered school officials), even the ones who aren't as endearing when we first meet them. A delightful treat.
  • (5/5)
    This is a book I re-read regularly, because the story is fantastic, the characters are well rounded, and E.L. Konigsburg really has a way with words.The book begins at nearly the end of the chronological order of events, then tracks back and forth to fill in the picture. Each major character is given ample development, because each is given his or her own chapter that intersects with another characters, demonstrating their connection to the others.The oversimplified plot goes something like this: four kids are involved in an academic quiz bowl competition in the ultimate battle: sixth graders vs. eighth graders. How this particular team comes together is really the crux of the matter. All the questions and answers used in the quiz bowl are included in the book, so be careful: you might just learn something!
  • (5/5)
    This is about four less-than-straight-A students who come together with their teacher, a paraplegic, to win the Academic Bowl. This story deals with issues of race, societal expectations, societal roles, and handicapped people by not dealing with these issues as issues. Rather, the author simply allows these multi-cultural, less than perfect students and their paraplegic teacher to tell their own stories. While the story is about winning a competition, it really is about the fact that every one of these less-than-perfect kids and their less-than-perfect teacher is a winner, especially when they work together.
  • (4/5)
    This is a good example of realistic fiction because each of the main characters comes from a diverse background. Also, they take a while to learn to trust each other before becoming "the souls" and even then may not associate with each other outside their meetings. Mrs. Olinski also chooses her team very carefully and focuses on the dynamics of the group.
  • (5/5)
    The 1997 Newberry Medal was rightfully bestowed to Konigsburg. While her first award in 1968 for The Mixed Up Files of Basil E. Frankweiler was also laudable, her second masterpiece is by far the greatest.As I turned each page, this highly crafted, wonderfully delightful tale solicited a wide spectrum of emotions, from tears to laughter and from sorrow to joy. Filled with insightful analogies and magical symbolism, Konigsburg fit all the fragmented pieces together while weaving past and present tense in a style that was easy to follow.Intuitively, sixth grade teacher Mrs. Olinsky choose a team of four to compete for the Academic Bowl contest. Each member brought separate skills and knowledge as together they rivaled even the toughest eighth grade team.The beauty of the story was not only in the winning, but truly in the magic of the journey as along the way each member, including their paraplegic mentor Mrs. Olinsky, learned the wisdom of kindness, of sharing, of caring and of the acceptance of things unseen and felt by the human heart.It is every writers dream to craft a heartwarming, deeply profound book such as this.Highly recommend!
  • (4/5)
    I thought this was a great book and I really enjoyed it.... BUT I feel like it's written towards a very specific middle school audience. It is not only about a school academic team and their competition, but it is written towards that kind of intelligent thoughtful student. Anyone not fitting this description will probably be extremely bored by the book.
  • (1/5)
    In general I've liked Konigsburg's other books, but I couldn't get more than an hour into (the audio version of ) this one. Just too slow. Maybe someday I'll try it in paper.
  • (4/5)
    Charming, engaging, and warm. I finished this book in one sitting, caught by Konigsburg's deft hand with detail and characterization. The story weaves together the disparate lives of four children, their families, and their 6th grade teacher. Friendship and genuine, unselfish giving are key themes.I suspect this book may appeal more to adult readers than to younger ones, however. Too bad....
  • (5/5)
    E.L. Konigsburg did a beautiful job of weaving together the stories of four individual children into one cohesive whole. Her characters are very believable and engaging, growing and emerging as the story progresses. Although each chapter in this book is almost a story in itself, the mystery of why these four sixth graders came together and what thy have to do with Mrs. Olinski and the Academic Bowl pulls the reader along through the book. The View from Saturday is a wonderful example of character development and unique literary style.
  • (4/5)
    Though this book was shelved in Juvenile lit, it was a well-written and enthralling story even to me. It is the story of how four middle school kids meet, in and out of school, and realize that they are connected to each other, through their parents, their grandparents, etc. and become extremely close friends. It switches perspective, which I don't usually like, but it is absolutely appropriate to the story and works beautifully.
  • (4/5)
    Awfully confusing read... so many characters and so many different points of view. Still, it is a good and interesting read, but the complexity only makes it a good choice for very high readers.