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Nation

Nation

Scritto da Terry Pratchett

Narrato da Stephen Briggs


Nation

Scritto da Terry Pratchett

Narrato da Stephen Briggs

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (165 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
9 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
Sep 30, 2008
ISBN:
9780061707438
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

The sea has taken everything.

Thirteen-year-old Mau is the only one left after a giant wave sweeps his island village away. But when much is taken, something is returned, and somewhere in the jungle, Daphne-a girl from the other side of the globe-is the sole survivor of a ship destroyed by the same wave.

Together, the two confront the aftermath of catastrophe. And slowly, other refugees arrive-children without parents, mothers without babies, husbands without wives-all of them hungry and all of them frightened. As Mau and Daphne struggle to keep the small band safe and fed, they defy ancestral spirits, challenge death himself, and uncover a long-hidden secret that literally turns the world upside down . . . .

Internationally revered storyteller Terry Pratchett presents a breathtaking adventure of survival and discovery, and of the courage required to forge new beliefs.

Editore:
Pubblicato:
Sep 30, 2008
ISBN:
9780061707438
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

Sir Terry Pratchett was the internationally bestselling author of more than thirty books, including his phenomenally successful Discworld series. His young adult novel, The Amazing Maurice and His Educated Rodents, won the Carnegie Medal, and Where's My Cow?, his Discworld book for “readers of all ages,” was a New York Times bestseller. His novels have sold more than seventy five million (give or take a few million) copies worldwide. Named an Officer of the British Empire “for services to literature,” Pratchett lived in England. He died in 2015 at the age of sixty-six.

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4.3
165 valutazioni / 140 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    It's been a long time since I've read this novel, but I remember quite a few things from it. My initial impression was that the two characters's experiences on the island were not connected, but the whole novel was about the two characters 'growing up' experience, what they learnt from each other and about others too. In this, it can be considered a double 'picaresque' novel, as if Pratchett had recreated a new world from an small island, with not so much a Big Bang, but as the result of a tsunami/earthquake. There is much less humour than in the Discworld novels, it is very different in tone and writing style, with quite possibly some underlying ecological and sociological message behind it all for readers. It doesn.t leave anyone indifferent and our interpretation of the whole can also differ from each other. It is a good read, chapters are relatively short, the action picks up pace along the pages and the characters could be the metaphor for a new Eden/world, like Adam and Eve, despite other additional people on the island. It is not your usual novel.
  • (5/5)
    Pratchett leaves Discworld behind to explore an alternative colonization that /wouldn't/ leave centuries of destruction in its wake. (There's no colonization on the Disc; it wouldn't be funny enough). Much sadder than your typical Pratchett, but with humor aplenty and the exploration of morality that is so apparent in late Pratchett. 
  • (4/5)
    In a world that isn't quite our own, in a place that isn't the South Pacific, a boy on the brink of manhood is on his way home from his ritual one-month exile, in the canoe he has made himself, when a volcano erupts and a tsunami is unleashed that, he discovers when he reaches his home island, wipes out his entire tribe.

    Mau's island isn't the only one affected, but it is one of the largest locally, and the place that other survivors gradually gather in the aftermath. The first of his fellow survivors, though, before anyone else joins them, is the lone survivor of a ship from a place that isn't quite our England. She's the daughter of a man who is 139th in line for the throne, on the way to join her father, governor of the colony at Port Mercier. What she doesn't know is that influenza has hit at home, and everyone between her father and the throne has died. A fast ship is on its way from home to Port Mercier to bring him back.

    Mau, Irmintrude (who chooses to tell him her name is Daphne, instead, because who wants to be called Irmintrude?), and the other survivors who trickle in to join them learn to communicate, learn to understand each other, and build a functioning new community. And then the cannibals arrive.

    This is a really enjoyable, satisfying story. Mau and Daphne each have a lot of assumptions to overcome, but they're good kids, and they're moreover smart and tough and ready to grow up as much as they have to in order to survive and make things work. The story goes in some unexpected places, and while this is intended for younger readers, adults will find plenty to enjoy and think about here, too.

    Recommended.

    I borrowed this book from the library.
  • (5/5)
    I know my goal was to read all the discworld books this year, but after I ran out of Stephen Briggs audiobooks, I saw this one. It's Pratchett, but melancholy. Stephen Briggs is a great narrator, as always. The book starts off with a tsunami coming and wiping out a boy's entire island. No people left. And the tsunami also shipwrecks a white girl onto this South Pacific island. They are alone and can't talk to each other, and other survivors are washing up on the shore too. And the island holds a mysterious secret in an ancient cave. The island boy and the white girl must build a little nation of their own if they are to survive. Pratchett's wordplay is in top form, and the writing is excellent, but there is a sadness behind the words. This is the book Pratchett wrote after being diagnosed with Alzheimer's, and you can see his anger and struggle in this story.
  • (5/5)
    Squee! I love this book more than I can express. Just go read it :)
  • (4/5)
    Terry Pratchett's Nation is a marked departure for the esteemed author from his Discworld series of books but presents the reader with many of the same issues and underlying messages as his other works. It's certainly well worth a read and introduces us to some truly memorable characters.
  • (4/5)
    A worthwhile read. A little challenging to get traction in the beginning but we'll worth your patience.
  • (4/5)
    This review contains spoilers relating to the ending of the book, as well as other sections of the story.rough synopsis: In a world a half a turn away from this one, in a history that never was for a geography that is almost but not quite one I could squint and recognise, a major tsunami happens across an archipelago. Post-tsunami, one local boy and one passing-through colonial girl end up as the sole survivors on a (small) remote island. Interesting communication failures happen, more people drift in, politics happens, romance is implied, science is demonstrated to be not only important but not just in the possession of those who believe that they are better by dint of wearing more clothes (and possibly by belonging to a nation that claims more land and less understanding of the peoples within them). I find it eternally fascinating how Pratchett takes what appears to be a single idea, and makes a novel out of it, while weaving in a myriad of other Important Ideas as if they weren't really there. In this book, the message that came through loud and clear was 'what is civilisation, and who gets to define it', with side orders of 'what are gods' and 'identity, what is it'. I think as a result of the main topic there ended up being far more unsympathetic or plain unlikeable characters than I was expecting, fully formed as they were, rather than the more caricatured unpleasant individuals of say, Ankh-Morpork. A further result was that while this is still a humorous book at times, the levity was smaller, more discrete, sometimes more forced than much of Pratchett's oeuvre. The first chapter is a frustrating wall of text. I found it difficult to follow, with the first half requiring multiple readings to establish who was where, and in which direction they were going. And the last section (or rather the first section, merely the last to make any sense) only became clear when an event roughly 2/3 of the way through the book inspired me to go back and re-read, at which point it illuminated some of the background/empire building politics. But from this unsteady foundation, stretched as it was geographically from England to the aforementioned remote archipelago, the story is drawn inexorably to a single important location - that of the Nation. This is the home of Mau, who is neither boy nor man, according to the ways of his people. And with the death of his people, Mau is the nation, a topic that is the trigger for much sole searching. He is also the focal character for more of Pratchett's pontification on the ways and wherefores of the Gods (as has been seen in other novels). And there is so much to explore here - the ideas of the ancestors as ghosts, of memories, of echoes that have been trapped rather than let free. The way in which Mau buries his people, allowing the God of Death to rule his body in order to do the job without completely fragmenting his sense of self. I find myself unable to poke at the ideas hard enough to get them to coallesce. The other major character, who we meet later than Mau, is Daphne, a 'trouserman girl' who spends the entire story redefining herself repeatedly as she experiences and reimagines the world. This is made explicit in her first attempt to introduce herself, where she gives her chosen name, rather than that which was given to her. This is used as an interesting motif, where the use of her two names illuminations her internal conflict with respect to her identities. And as she redefines herself, she comes to understandings about the people that she is with, that she could not have done as the aristocratic child of the empire from the start of the story. And yet, annoyingly, at the end Daphne defines the Nation--the people of the island--as civilised only by her colonising standards of scientific endeavour. It isn't that she doesn't recognise their current lifestyle as valid, but that who they had been, at some unremembered time, was somehow 'more', and thus that is what she identifies as valuable. Up to this point, the colonial invaders do not recognise the worth of the Nation and its people. This is characterised by the response that Daphne gives when her father asks "What is so special about this place?" and she tells not of the people, or their strength, their persistence, their survival, their existence, their right to self-determination but:" 'There's a cave. It's got wonderful carvings in it. It's ancient. It may be more than a hundred thousand years old' ... "I think there are star maps on the ceiling...' " Oddly, this is the first book I've read in a while that I've wanted to truly disect. I've done a half assed job so far - there are so many thoughts, scrambling in all directions. The contrast between the spirit of scientific enquiry of Mau and Daphne and the acceptance of the world of some of the other characters; the multiple variations on the destructive invaders theme explored both conceptually with the myth of the cannabalistic islanders from the north and the threefold invasions of nature, pirates and empire; the destructive ways of nature, contrasting the tsunami that makes Mau chief of the Nation with the virus that makes Daphne's father the king of the Empire; the insistence that magic is science unexplained coupled to truly inexplicable events of which an answer is suggested for one. Recommended - yes. I want people to read it so that I can debate it with them. The characterisation, world-building, writing and plot are all good. I noticed nothing that I should warn for, which may be an indication of poor memory/perception rather than anything else. 7/10
  • (5/5)
    A beautiful work by Terry Pratchett. Humorous, exciting, and full of characters you can't help but love, even down to the old lady with no teeth who has no real bearing on the overall story. This is not a Discworld story; it's set instead in our world, sort of. It's a great treatise on Empire and its effects on both the conqueror and those who would be conquered. And it also tackles issues of racism, multiculturalism, and communication across the chasm of culture.
  • (3/5)
    Definitely not my favorite Pratchett title, but definitely not a bad book either. Solidly in the center of the board for me at three stars. Refreshing take on religious themes for a YA audience. Enjoyable, often humorous.
  • (5/5)
    Several times, while reading this, I had to put the book down and double check the author to make sure I was reading a Pratchett book. I like Pratchett, but I’m not a superfan and can tire of that tongue in cheek British quirkiness. Nation has this, but it’s only really at the beginning and the end of the book. This is a very different sort of book, quite different from his other YA offerings. I would think twice before offering it to a younger reader, making sure they are mature enough for it. Pratchett doesn’t reign in anything here. Big issues are raised, about civilization and society, but most importnantly the strength of the individual vs. blind faith in a god/gods. The overly religious may take issue with this book. I’d be surprised if there weren’t complaints already. Knowing that Practhett was diaganosed with alzheimer's while writing Nation makes it even more poignant. There is a lot of anger here. And sorrow, but with a small spark of hope throughout.

    Aside from this, it’s a gripping story, heartbreaking in places, funny in others. I love the way Daphne and Mau are written, and I’m so glad it is not a typical Tarzan/Jane storyline. Mau is taken seriously, and is a well-developed character. Pratchett treats Mau’s civilization the same way he treats Daphne’s, respecting it while pointing out it’s ridiculousness.
  • (4/5)
    stutters a bit, but is well read and sounds wonderful
  • (4/5)
    A delightful story from Pratchett. It's set somewhere nearer to home than Discworld, but has his same mix of humour, social comment and philosophy.
  • (4/5)
    The story was as good as I remember and the narration was enjoyable.
  • (3/5)
    This was my first non-Tiffany Aching TP experience. I ADORE the Wee Free Men. I found Nation to be terribly boring for the first 95 pages, and just when I thought I had read enough to justify putting it down, it got really interesting and I finished the remaining 270 pages in nearly one sitting. I was intrigued at the beginning with the questions of education and cultural rituals and how far they can get from reality. Both Mau (an island native) and Daphne (a Victorian princess-type) are totally unprepared for survival after a tsunami strands them together on an island. Well, Mau can find food and shelter and all that, but is at a loss for how to perform the rituals to his gods. The novel then turns to questions of faith and science and whether they are mutually exclusive. In the end, it comes down heavily on the side of science, but I think acknowledges the power and importance of belief. I think maybe Pratchett is saying that science is our new religion. I'd be interested to hear some other interpretations.
  • (4/5)
    Narrated by Stephen Briggs. Although this is aimed at young readers, it's a story that can be enjoyed on different levels whatever your age. For kids, "Nation" is an island adventure. Teen readers will identify with Mau and Daphne's questioning of the values they grew up with. And adults will recognize the conflicts of culture, religion, and colonialism. Narrator Stephen Briggs does a masterful job immersing listeners in this island world and the huge challenges it faces. Cheers for Mau, who truly earns his manhood leading this new Nation.
  • (4/5)
    While Mau is paddling back home to Nation, from the boys' island, Little Nation, a tsunami hits and everything Mau has ever known is taken away. Expecting to return home to the celebration of his becoming a man, and getting his tattoo marking Mau as both adult and member of Nation. Instead, he finds nothing but death and destruction. So the boy who is not a boy but not yet a man sets forth building a new Nation.Mau discovers that since he is not yet a man and, by his culture's norms, has no soul he can question everything. And he does. Everything he ever knew is up for questioning, even the big question of "things happen." Mau changes it all, and says, "Does not happen."Daphne, aboard the Sweet Judy on her way to meet her father, captain of another ship, gets stranded on Nation. Until she meets Mau, she does not question anything and tries to make things "just so" in that British sort of way.And so, Mau and Daphne (not her real name) join forces and learn to survive as more people from other islands affected by the Big Wave arrive. Slowly a community is built, and they face down their enemies with brain power and just a little force.This book was a delight to read, mostly because Pratchett wrote characters who were completely willing to question everything they thought they knew, including their religion. Mau's unwillingness to bend to the rituals of what once was just because it once was is an interesting way of discussing religion on a larger scale.Nation is about survival, family of choice, friendship, and community. Mostly I think it's about learning to let people be who they are and not try to force them to be who we think they should be.
  • (4/5)
    While it's definitely got its problematic bits, I did really enjoy this lovely distillation of Terry Pratchett's primary ethos ("be decent to each other, for crying out loud, it's all we've got") into a shipwreck adventure.
  • (3/5)
    3/5

    An interesting well written story but I never really got into it unfortunately.
  • (4/5)
    If I had to sum up this novel in one word, it would be "poignant". Pratchett faces the age-old question, "why do bad things happen?" and struggles with it mightily. He doesn't necessarily come up with the right answer, but if you just want one right answer, I'd be happy to recommend some religious tracts for you. No, he instead explores the process that some very realistic characters go through struggling with the question, as well as the rationalizations that other very realistic characters use to avoid grappling with it at all. In other words, he tells a deep, satisfying story, and from him I would expect no less. A quite dark book, but most great books are, aren't they?
  • (4/5)
    I've actually been waiting a long time to listen to this and I'm glad I finally got a chance to. This book floats between very serious life altering actions and how they affect the way the characters feel about the world, their gods etc and then by silly funny misunderstanding jokes. I really loved the different characters and how they interacted with each other and watching people grow and change.
  • (4/5)
    This is unlike any other Pratchett book I've read. There's hardly any dialogue in the opening and the setting is unique amongst all his books. It often reminded me of Lord of the Flies. I found myself wondering if the gash through the island was caused by the plane crash.It covers a lot of ground but centrally I suppose it's about faith and what happens when you lose it. The ending's tone is mismatched from the rest of the book, but don't let you put you off. This is a deep book and truly superb. It's almost as good as Mort!
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoyed this take of a nation coming to be. What an interesting perspective this was. I enjoyed the characters, the parallel universe, and the way the story flowed. Really beautiful story.
  • (3/5)
    This is the story of survival after a tsunami hits an island. One native is left from the people living on the island and one girl is shipwrecked there. Others come and join them fleeing devastation on their islands.

    How do you deal with catastrophe? How do you handle loss that is so big that there is no logic to it? There is a part of us that wants to rationalize the loss we see in the world. That person got cancer because they ate unhealthily for years or it was genetic and passed down. They failed to pay attention and caused a fatal car accident. But sometimes, bad things happen to good people and there is no logic. For those of us that believe in a higher being a natural question is, why? Why do bad things happen to good people? Personally I found more compelling address to this question in C.S. Lewis's book, The Problem with Pain. But the question remains a valid question and I am glad to see it asked in Pratchett's book. If you worship a higher being how strong is your god? Where is your god when bad things happen?

    Overall, this was an enjoyable story. Pratchett's characters portray he wry humor he is well known for. The island has some mysteries and there are some interesting plot twists. While it was not my favorite Pratchett book I enjoyed reading it.
  • (4/5)
    I loved this. Not Discworld. Probably aimed at YA, and I will recommend it to my 14 yo son. Thoughtful, dealing with religion & faith, puberty, family, racism, and culture. Leavened with just enough humor and excitement to make it engaging.
  • (3/5)
    In an alternate history there is a wave, and island and a ship. Thus begins the story of a young woman and a young man struggling to know themselves and to survive.This is another example of the author's struggle with belief, what it means to believe, why people believe and why they don't. As is usual with Pratchett, ideas are put forth, but not insisted upon and conclusions are left to the reader. I found the read enjoyable, but something about the narrative style wore on me. It is very like the Tiffany Aching books, with a character thinking, rethinking and questioning that thinking repetitively. Almost as if he doesn't trust the reader to get his point. Anyway, still enjoyable as it explores island life, presuppositions and misunderstandings people of different cultures have about one another, and dealing with grief.
  • (4/5)
    Funny, fascinating, and the nicest book involving magical realism I've read yet. I've tried to read other things by Terry Pratchett, but none of them hit the right chord with me like this book did.

    The characters and their world are distinctive and enjoyable, with constant allusions to depth and detail which make the world feel real without ever being tedious. This story is short and easy to get through, with themes and ideas which would appeal to a child while providing plenty of complex material for an adult to ponder.
  • (5/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    Nation is a stand-alone story from a master of story-telling, Terry Pratchett. If you only know Pratchett's work from his Discworld series then you are missing out.Nation starts out with a simple, yet tragic, situation. A great tsunami sweeps across the ocean wiping out life on many islands. The only apparent survivor is a young boy - Mau, who is returning from his time on the Boy's Island so that he can become a man. He returns home to find that everybody he knew and loved has been killed by the wave. Now Mau is the only survivor of what was once the largest and most powerful people in the region - the Nation. Oh, and since nobody is waiting for Mau when he arrives to complete the ceremony with the very sharp knife, and the tattoos, Mau is stuck between worlds without a soul and he just might be a demon in disguise. Mau is not alone as he soon meets Daphne - the ghost girl - the only survivor of the ill-fated ship Sweet Judy that was washed up onto the island of the Nation by the tsunami. Daphne is certain that her father - a governor in His Majesty's Government - will soon send out ships to rescue her, but in the meantime she must learn how to survive on an island with a strange boy and no common language. As Mau and Daphne begin to understand each other more survivors of the tsunami show up and soon both are put into situations neither has prepared for, and they then learn about the secrets being kept hidden on the island. Nation is a wonderful story, filled with great and compelling characters and more than just a touch of humor. Mau and Daphne are unique and compelling characters, each struggling to rise above the challenges they face together, while each also struggles to rise above the shadows of their ancestors that seem to loom over their shoulders throughout the story. For Mau it is the insistent chatter of his dead ancestors, the Grandfathers, who harangue Mau at every opportunity to restore the Godstones, to defend the Nation. For Daphne, it is to come out of the shadow of her overbearing grandmother and the expectation to only do what is "proper" and correct as a lady would do. Both Mau and Daphne come to terms with their own place in the world and by the end are able to stand up to their ancestors and tell them where they can go. Nation also serves as a mirror that allows the reader to reflect and examine our own lives and how we'd react to an incomprehensible tragedy. Mau's world has been dominated by the Gods and his ancestors, and Pratchett doesn't pull any punches as Mau begins to question the sanity of any God or Gods who would allow such destruction and pain to happen. This is a question that many people - including myself - have struggled with. If God (or Gods) is all powerful and benevolent why does God allow tragedy to happen? Why are their earthquakes and tsunami that kill off our loved ones? Why is their disease and death? Because of God's will? Because of sin? Does an innocent child deserve to feel God's wrath? What sin did the child commit? These are the questions that Mau struggles with in the story in a way that only Sir Terry can deliver. It allows the reader to reflect upon these same questions in their own life and maybe help them find the answers they are seeking.As usual with Sir Terry's work I found nothing that detracted from the story. The characters were well-developed, even the minor ones, and the story and plot were spot on. Pratchett delivers a sort of sermon on belief and faith that does not come across as preachy. I listened to the audiobook version of Nation, narrated by the wonderful Stephen Briggs. As usual Briggs brings the world that Pratchett has created to vibrant life and delivers a masterful performance. If you are a fan of Terry Pratchett's work, and have never read outside of the Discworld books, or if you are looking for a great story with strong and compelling characters, a little bit of humor, and are not afraid of reflecting on the questions posed by the author, then I highly recommend Nation.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

    This is a standalone, not Discworld book from Pratchett. A big theme here is organized religion and belief without questioning. It is a coming of age story as well, set in a parallel world to our own, similar in many ways. This may be considered YA, but adults will understand some of it better and may be uncomfortable with the issues it raises. I quite enjoy Pratchett's writing and this was no different. He makes you think - even when you don't completely agree with him.

    1 persona l'ha trovata utile

  • (4/5)
    Daphne meets Mau after her boat she was travelling on lands on an island after being in a tsunamai. Mau is an islander who claims it as his island. Refugees come from other islands - this creates tension while they are trying to create a home for them all. A great read.