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The Burning: A Novel

The Burning: A Novel

Scritto da Jane Casey

Narrato da Sarah Coomes


The Burning: A Novel

Scritto da Jane Casey

Narrato da Sarah Coomes

valutazioni:
4/5 (69 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
14 ore
Pubblicato:
May 8, 2012
ISBN:
9781455860920
Formato:
Audiolibro

Descrizione

The Burning Man. It's the name the media has given a brutal murderer who has beaten four young women to death before setting their bodies ablaze in secluded areas of London's parks. And now there's a fifth.

Maeve Kerrigan is an ambitious detective constable, keen to make her mark on the murder task force. Her male colleagues believe Maeve's empathy clouds her judgment, but the more she learns about the latest victim, Rebecca Haworth, from her grieving friends and family, the more determined Maeve becomes to bring her murderer to justice. But how do you catch a killer no one has seen when so much of the evidence has gone up in smoke?

Maeve's frenetic hunt for a killer in The Burning, Jane Casey's series debut, is a gripping introduction to one of the most engaging crime fiction characters in recent memory.

Pubblicato:
May 8, 2012
ISBN:
9781455860920
Formato:
Audiolibro


Informazioni sull'autore

JANE CASEY is the author of the Maeve Kerrigan novels (Let the Dead Speak, After the Fire) and the Jess Tennant Mysteries (Hide and Seek, Bet Your Life). A graduate of Oxford she also has received a M. Phil from Trinity College, Dublin. Born and raised in Dublin, she lives in London where she works as an editor.

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    I am happy I have set a goal to read all the books in the series, this year I was given the latest book "Let the Dead Speak" for review and I'm glad about it because I have read the Scandinavian crime along with other detectives from across the world but I had no knowledge about Jane Casey, well, unfortunately.I enjoyed this book, it was more with explicit details and when the main character, Maeve was in scary situation my heart was with her and I, too was full of suspense. I found it interesting to see the character presented in the first book, her personal life struggles trying or let's say given up a try to balance the work+relationship leaves the marks for one way or another, having read the Let the Dead Speak, I am intrigued what's happening in the series of books in between.So, The Burning is about finding the serial murder of various young woman badly murdered by burning them and cutting before hand. Seems the person has really hated woman as such. The story starts with so well with a very scary episode of the next victim...it sets the atmosphere and plays on woman readers. However, the team is sure the serial killer is about to get more thirsty and attack out of his pattern, by causing crime more often. The book is drawing more attention to the last victim Rebecca and those who knew her, Maeve tries to draw an image of whom the Rebecca was when she was alive, they receive quite a mixed point of views, which makes it way more difficult to understand how to solve the case. The Burning is a crime, psychological detective. I give 5 stars because it was interesting, I was hooked for 7 hours and I was reading till 04:00am, it was scary but not overly, repeatedly gross or creepy. It was interesting and I had no clue who could be the guilty one!I didn't like this large print cover, although it does fit the story perfectly, actually, better than something really gross, the matches burning is fine.
  • (4/5)
    The Metropolitan Police Department is chasing a serial killer called the Burning Man. in the Kennington section of London. They have four dead bodies, laid out neatly and then burned, and an increasingly frightened public and the media demanding answers.

    It's all bad, but then it gets worse if possible. A young woman accepts a ride from stranger on her way home from a pub, and then becomes alarmed, convinced he's the killer, and when he stops the car nowhere near her home, she panics and pulls out a knife. Briefly, the police think they have the Burning Man and a living intended victim as a witness. Maeve Kerrigan, a young Detective Constable, interviews the victim and discovers that while the man she knifed is probably a creep, he's certainly not the Burning Man. Almost simultaneously, another body is found, dead, burned, apparently a real victim of the Burning Man.

    But some things just don't quite fit, and Superintendent Godley assigns Maeve to investigate the death of Rebecca Haworth as a separate death, to figure out if it's a Burning Man killing or a copycat.

    The story is told primarily in Maeve's voice, with some chapters from the viewpoint and voice of Louise North, Rebecca's best friend. She's Maeve's contemporary but a very different woman, and she provides insight into Rebecca--or at least one side of her.

    Maeve is a likable and interesting character, and as she investigates we learn about her strengths, her insecurities, and we begin to learn about the complexities of Rebecca.

    It's a well-told and and well-paced tale, and I'm seriously looking forward to reading more in the series. One aspect that may surprise younger American readers is the niggling, persistent, low-level harassment not just as a woman, but as "Irish." She was born and raised in England, but her parents are from Ireland, and a certain level of prejudice is just taken for granted in a way Americans wouldn't expect for that particular ethnic group.

    Recommended.

    I received a free electronic galley of this book from the publisher via NetGalley.
  • (3/5)
    Um. No spoilers, I don't do that... but I'm ~not~ sure I'm keen on the way this ended. Liked much about it, the back & forth between Maeve's & Loise's POV.... but the end....
    Hm.
    Will try her 2nd (The Reckoning?)hold further opinions until then.
  • (4/5)
    Compelling mystery.
  • (4/5)
    The premise of The Burning is intriguing. It's about serial murders and DC Maeve Kerrigan. Though the story itself is told via multiple points of view. Maeve is young, in a troubled relationship, and eager to prove herself in a male-dominated field. The case she's involved in centers on the murders by a serial killer come to be known as the Burning Man, a person who brutalizes and burns women. When the fifth victim is found, Maeve throws up some interesting questions and gets deeply involved with the case, leading to some startling revelations.

    The story moves forward at just the right pace, and there's no "padding" here - the book flows well, without getting caught up in needless description and details. Maeve is an interesting character and one of the strengths of the story is the author's ability to delve more deeply into her characters. The format where the story is told by different individual's points of view also facilitates this.
  • (4/5)
    Great start to a new series. DC Maeve Kerrigan is an appealing character, trying to make her way in a profession that's still very much a man's world. I've already requested Book 2 from the library.
  • (4/5)
    Maeve is a DC on the team investigating a series of murders in which women are killed and then burned. Rebecca Haworth appears to be the latest victim, although there are differences in her case and Maeve is tasked with investigating her death from the perspective of a second killer trying to pin the murder on the "Burning Man". Rebecca's best friend, Louise, narrates short alternating chapters in the first person.I enjoyed this novel very much. Maeve was good at her job; there was a certain amount of narration of her personal life, but only enough to make us root for her more and not enough to slow down the narrative. It was interesting and well-paced; the plot made sense and there were just enough characters to keep on top of. Up until the 75% mark I was ready to give this book five stars, but the ending was a disappointment - not the resolution of the mystery, but rather the way in which it was dragged out. SPOILERSPerhaps it was unrealistic to expect Louise to roll over and confess, but the pages ploughing through various preliminary and bail hearings was uninteresting and stopped the momentum of the plot dead. The letter she wrote Gil, explaining what she had done and why was also rather long. One other quibble I had was about the portrayal of Gil and his (wholly unrealistic) sudden love for Louise.Nevertheless, I am excited to have discovered this series and plan to read the rest.
  • (2/5)
    2,5. Not a badly written detective story at all, but the main character could have been much more interesting. Entertaining enough if you're looking for an in-between read though :)
  • (3/5)
    While "The Burning" is well-written and entertaining, I had two problems with it. First, I figured out who did it much too early. Second, the way the resolution came about was disappointing. It was similar to James Bond movies where the villain has captured Bond and feels compelled to tell him all about his evil plots before he kills him. It would be a great airplane book.
  • (4/5)
    A terrific police procedural and really good characters. Definitely recommended.
  • (3/5)
    A serial killer is on the loose and Maeve Kerrigan is on the hunt. As a debut novel, I found it to be enjoyable but I also thougt it lacked the character definition I was looking for. The characters were likable and relatable but lacked depth. Thr storyline was good but I was able to guess the "killer" halfway through the book.
  • (3/5)
    I enjoyed this police procedural/psychological thriller. Casey has created an appealing protagonist in Maeve Kerrigan, a police constable in London and the only woman on her squad investigating the serial murders of four young women whose savagely beaten bodies have been set afire in London parks. When Kerrigan examines the crime scene of the fifth victim she believes that it is not the work of the serial killer but of a copycat killer. Her boss chief Superintendent Godley gives her the go-ahead to follow her idea of an second murderer.Kerrigan correctly assumes that the key to the solution is to find out as much as she can about the fifth victim, Rebecca Haworth. As she peels away the layers of Rebecca's life she has to go back ten years to Oxford University and her involvement with another murdered student. Kerrigan slowly untangles Rebecca's relationship with her doting parents, university friends, colleagues and abusive boyfriend. I guessed the murderer fairly early on because the author plays very fair with the clues. But the thrust of the novel is not the puzzle of the crime as much as why the criminal murdered Rebecca.Well-written, realistic but not sensational, and with a cast of interesting believable characters, The Burning is a very satisfying read. I look forward to Casey's next novel.
  • (5/5)
    Early reviewer win.The cover compares Ms. Casey to Tana French and Sophie Hannah, both of whom I love. And it is a well-deserved comparison.Maeve's situation in Operation Mandrake--a task force trying to catch a serial killer who burns his victims--is not an enviable one. She's the only woman in working with a bunch of crude men (rather Prime Suspect-ish). Although born in England, she's obviously of Irish descent, which is also a source of harassment. But she puts up with it because she's good at her job and she knows it. So she's a bit nonplussed when she's assigned to a burning case that may be a copycat of The Burning Man.The story is told in chapters alternating between Maeve and Lousie North, best friend of the murder victim in the case Maeve is investigating, building the tension as the chapters flip back and forth. The resolution of the mystery comes as no surprise, but I don't think it was meant to be a shocking revelation. The tension builds in waiting to see how the mystery will be solved by the characters.I definitely want more Maeve Kerrigan!
  • (4/5)
    I really enjoy a good, solid police procedural-- sans fancy CSI work and scientific gobblydegook and teams of technicians saving the day-- and that's what I got with The Burning. Maeve Kerrigan is far from being a solid, stable detective, but neither is she a stereotypical ladder-climbing, ambitious female protagonist. She has her dust-ups with the high-testesterone makeup of the force, but she's got the brains and drive to stay a step ahead. She's not the kind of protagonist who's going to rush into unstable situations where she has to Have a Man to Save Her; this is a woman who's quite capable of doing her own work, even while she chafes under the supervision of a very oppresive boss.The plot of this novel was complex and intriguing-- serial killer with a spin and a twist. It was highly psychological, and all the characters, main and supporting, were quite well developed (and I can't wait to see more of them). The setting was quite rich; Casey really draws you in.I eagerly look forward to further entries from this series.
  • (3/5)
    Enjoyable read. Characters worked well together. Will watch for the next in the series.
  • (5/5)
    I really enjoyed this book! The characterization is fabulous. I really like Maeve and Rob and can't wait to read more cases with them. The whodunit is easy to figure out, but I felt that it didn't impede the story at all. This author has been compared to Tana French and I agree with the assessment. This one kept me turning pages, and was a fascinating police procedural. Thanks LibraryThing!
  • (5/5)
    I will be looking forward to the next entry in this series. I thought it was well written; the characters were interesting and realistically portrayed; and the story lines entirely held my interest. The author did a great job of maintaining the suspense and introducing enough twists that I kept guessing most of the way through. Maeve Kerrigan is one of the only women constables on a premiere murder task force, and faces opposition personally from the men and professionally from higher-ups in the department who don't agree with her theories. There is a serial killer operating in London who appears to have murdered 5 women. Maeve believes that the 5th victim is the work of a copy cat. The chapters are presented alternately from the points of view of Maeve and Louise, the best friend of the 5th victim. It works well in this particular book. The relationships among the police felt realistic to me, and I'm interested in learning more about them all.
  • (4/5)
    There is a serial killer roaming the streets killing young women and then burning their bodies. The Burning begins with the murder of yet another young woman, Rebecca. Maeve Kerrigan, a detective working in England with Irish roots, has taken abuse from her fellow detectives because of her heritage and her gender is given the task of getting into the head of Rebecca to find out who she was, why she was murdered, and if she truly was a victim of The Burning Man. Jane Casey tells the story via dueling narrative. We follow Maeve as she goes about her investigation, but we are also privy to the inner thoughts and outward actions of Louise, Rebecca's "best friend." The story is well written and compelling, even after I had figured out "whodunit" I did still want to see how it played out. I wanted to read The Burning because Jane Casey was compared to Tana French - it's not quite as good (I love Tana French it would have taken a great deal to compare), but while you're waiting for Tana French's next book this will help tide you over.
  • (4/5)
    Jane Casey does an excellent job with this book. There are 2 story lines to follow though the one that Jane made me think would be front and center sort of drops to the background in my mind when the other one begins to be investigated. Her characters are well developed and strong and the plot keeps you captivated.
  • (5/5)
    When I first started this book, I didn't think i was going to like it. But after a couple chapters, I was hooked. Maeve Kerrigan has two strikes against her in the London police force: she is a woman and she is Irish. But she loves being a cop and she is determined not to be pushed out of the investigation into The Burning Man, a London serial killer who sets his victims on fire. The latest victim is Rebecca Haworth. But there are discrepancies and her boss thinks it might be a copycat and assigns Maeve to investigate. She is upset at being pushed out of the serial killer investigation but then becomes convinced there is another killer at work and she won't quit until she catches him. The author alternates the chapters between Maeve and Louise North, Rebecca's best friend, keeping the reader guessing if Louise knows something or is going to be the next victim.The story was a fast-paced, well-crafted thriller that I had a hard time putting down at night. I thought I knew who the killer was early on, but then I would keep doubting myself.I hope the author writes another book with Kerrigan, I think she would be great in a series.I highly recommend this book.
  • (4/5)
    I basically enjoyed this mystery within a mystery. The basic plot finds a young female murder detective, Maeve Kerrigan, investigating the murder of a young woman named Rebecca, whose murder, on the surface, appears to be the work of a serial killer who burns the bodies of their victims in deserted parks. As Maeve struggles to gain credibility as a young female on the murder team, she begins to notice things about Rebecca's murder that point to a killer that might have had a more personal motivation.There were some plot points that were a little contrived, and I have to say that the basic structure of the narrative, with alternating points of view between Maeve Kerrigan and Louise, Rebecca's purported best friend, gave me a HUGE clue as to who is ultimately responsible for the death of Rebecca. I don't normally mind a shifting point of view, but, in a mystery I think it needs to be handled very subtly or you can inadvertently give away more than the surface narrative might otherwise, which happened for me as I was reading it.I think the characters were well developed and the writing flowed nicely. Maeve wasn't too perfect, and she had plenty of her own frustrations and opinions, and her own professional woes and personal crises to distract her during her investigation. Louise was a bit card board, and I'm not so sure how true her motivations for murder ring with me, but, I didn't find it so unbelievable as to ruin my enjoyment of an otherwise fun, and engaging read.I would definitely recommend this book to people who enjoy watching or reading modern police procedurals, especially those of with a UK bend, like Tana French or the Prime Suspect series.
  • (4/5)
    4.0 out of 5 stars - Solid investigative police proceduralThe Burning Man is the name given by the press to the killer who has attacked and beat four women to death before setting them on fire in various places in the city of London. Maeve Kerrigan, a detective constable and one of the few women on the team, is called to the scene of a fifth victim. As she begins to delve into the crime and interview friends and relatives, some questions about this particular murdered woman, Rebecca Haworth -- make Maeve wonder if Rebecca is really the victim of a copycat killer instead.The narrative is told in the alternating voices of Louise, Rebecca's best friend, and Detective Kerrigan. Although the ending is somewhat predictable, the story is good and the characters are well developed. It's not a typical fast paced suspense thriller but more a well plotted and deliberate by the book report of the investigation into the crimes. I understand this is the debut of a new series and I will most likely look for the next one when it comes out.
  • (4/5)
    Jane Casey's The Burning is a crime novel set in London during the reign of a particularly heinous serial killer. Known as the "Burning Man", he attacks women in the night, beating them and then setting their bodies on fire, destroying all evidence. Enter DC Maeve Kerrigan, a young detective assigned to the murder of Rebecca Haworth, who may or may not have fallen victim to the Burning Man. This novel follows Maeve as she tries to weed her way through Rebecca's past, determined to prove her murder was a little more personal than the assumption that she was the Burning Man's latest victim. The novel is also told from the point of view of Rebecca's shy and quiet best friend Louise North, whose always lived in her friend's shadow and by all accounts has loved and worshiped her since the day they met. Louise's story offers another account of Rebecca's past, as well as interesting insights into the current events taking place.I enjoyed the book as a whole, but found it to be pretty slow to develop. Being told from two different points of views does help leave the reader guessing as to the conclusion, though. It's a classic whodunit with some modern flair. Set against the backdrop of London, it sometimes feels as though the detectives are following a modern-day Jack the Ripper- serial killer plaguing the streets of London at night, prowling on younger women and savagely killing them. I'd like the think this is the effect the author was going for.One thing that really bothered me about the character development was the abrupt end to the budding romance between the main character and her colleague, Rob. Her attraction and affection toward him starts partially through the book, comes to a peak about three quarters through, and then... NOTHING. He's barely even mentioned in the last fifty pages! Although she explains that they could never be together because of their work relationship, the attraction would not just stop. However, Rob's appearances in the book seem to. Unfortunately, there's no closure to this particular side story.I would like to see a series of crime novels featuring Maeve Kerrigan- she's a strong woman, a well-rounded character, and a brilliant detective. There is also a small group of great supporting characters who could be developed further later on, or left in the background to support and aid the hero. I give this book four out of five stars.
  • (4/5)
    Enjoyable and engrossing British detective mystery. A little longer than necessary but a good start for the series. I suspect this series/author will improve with time and look forward to the next.
  • (4/5)
    This book was a bit of a bait-and-switch. Although the description talks about a serial killer on the loose in London, the serial killer angle is quickly abandoned to concentrate on the most recent victim, Rebecca, and two women connected to her -- her self-described best friend, Louise North, and Maeve Kerrigan, the police detective assigned to the case. The mystery of who killed Rebecca is pretty easy to figure out, leaving only the question of why she died. But unfortunately, that question is easy to guess as well. This is mostly due to the structure of the book, which uses those alternating-viewpoint chapters so beloved by thriller writers, but which don't really work here. Instead, the suspense is all in when Maeve will be able to prove her case, and the narrative seems to drag that out a bit. A long digression into the capture of the actual serial killer is much more suspenseful and interesting than the Rebecca plotline.It's great to read a thriller with two strong female characters at its center. The writing flowed wonderfully and kept me turning the pages. I enjoyed the details about London, especially the prevalence of surveillance cameras and their effect on police work. But when you're three-quarters of the way through the book and still being introduced to Maeve's police colleagues, it's obviously not the focus of the book. In the end, the mystery of Rebecca's killing was just not interesting enough to center the novel. I would like to read a different book featuring Maeve Kerrigan, but giving her a better case to work on.
  • (4/5)
    I liked the novel way this was written, concentrating on the victim instead of the killer, also in alternating chapters with the police detective Maeve telling the investigative side and the victim's best friend telling us about the victim. It was, however, rather predictable in that I guessed who had done it and pretty much why before the book was even half finished.
  • (5/5)
    It's always a good sign when the first thing you do after finishing a book is go look for others by the same author. Which is exactly what I did after finishing The Burning, buying The Reckoning while on vacation in Europe, where it's already out. Maeve Kerrigan is a well-drawn protagonist: a bit reckless, commitment-phobic, and quick to anger, she's also clever, funny, and very easy to relate to. Her squabbles with coworkers, her relationship with her mother, and her ambitions at work all ring very true. And she's thrust into the middle of a fascinating case that quickly turns from run-of-the-mill procedural to psychological thriller. If there's one complaint I have about the book, it's that I figured out who the killer was pretty quickly. It didn't temper my enjoyment of the book at all, which tells you how much I liked it.
  • (4/5)
    "You can change everything about yourself - the way you look, the way you talk, the way you behave - but you can't escape what you truly are..." so says Louise North, one of the multi-faceted characters in Jane Casey's The Burning. I remember reading a review before starting this book that indicated it was less about the serial killings taking place in London parks for whom the book is named, and I found that to be true. However, it matters little...I enjoyed this book immensely. It was a compelling read with good characters and more than a few twists. I thought the opening chapter was fabulous, and I appreciated the way Casey alternated chapters between Maeve, the young DC trying to make a name for herself, and Louise, best friend of Rebecca, the supposed latest victim of the Burning Man. I loved how we went back into Rebecca's past in an attempt to find her murderer, and how Casey does the same for Louise. Maeve is a great character who reminded me of a British Kinsey Milhone, a ringing endorsement indeed!
  • (3/5)
    I had a love/hate relationship with this book. I found it very hard to get into at first. The dysfunctional nature of the police interactions really bothered me. The female police officer (Maeve) didn't seem to be able to approach these issues with any positive outlook and instead seemed to behave in ways that increased the tension with fellow officers. Her difficulty with one officer in particular ((DI Judd) was not sufficiently fleshed out. Since women know that they have to be proactive, especially in male-dominated jobs, I found this character to be very unsatisfying. This was probably what the author intended but I found it hard to put up with.As the book progressed, however, the plot seemed to even out and there was less anxiety apparent in the writing. The initial serial killer activity wound down very quickly and the book changed its personality into a more of a suspense novel than a thriller. The ending was satisfying but in a way that I thought was somewhat dull and not consistent with the previous style.
  • (4/5)
    A serial killer is loose, terrorizing the women of London. There have been have been four victims so far, the women beat to death and then set on fire. The police have few clues, are being pressure to make an arrest by the public and the press.And now there is a fifth victim!Or is there?On the surface, when the body of Rebecca Haworth, terribly burned. her scull crushed, is found, everyone assumes it is the work of the killer the papers have dubbed "The Burning Man". But DC Maeve Kerrigan is not totally convinced. There are a few inconsistencies from the other killings and she is afraid that they might have a copycat on their hands. A young woman in a mostly male police unit, her instincts are mostly dismissed by her colleagues, but her boss gives her the chance to investigate the fifth killing independently and see whether it is the work of their serial killer or not.The story is told in alternating chapters told from the point of view of Maeve and Louise North, a barrister and Rebecca's best friend since college in Oxford. It is these two characters especially who are, to my mind the real strength of the story. Maeve is a great character and I can only hope that we will see more of her in the future. She is smart and funny, adept at handling the often sexist remarks of her fellow cops and used to being underestimate...well, until she solves the crime. This is very much a psychological mystery where the interest is learning about the characters and gradually learning their stories, including that of the victim Rebecca. On the surface, she seemed the perfect golden girl, successful, beautiful and popular, but let's say looks can be deceiving.And that deception may be the key to her death.I had a small issue or two with the book. I like a mystery that plays fair, that is, gives you the information that would be required to figure it out and that was not totally true in this case. Some facts that the police had access to are not shared with us until near the last part of the book. Also, I think the story lagged a bit in the center, but a quite satisfying ending made me forget all about that. This is the kind of book where you sort of miss the characters when the last page is turned, even one who turned out to have so many evil layers that you have no business feeling for them..but I did.A good, solid, well written police procedural that I can certainly recommend