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The Last Battle

The Last Battle

Scritto da C. S. Lewis

Narrato da Patrick Stewart


The Last Battle

Scritto da C. S. Lewis

Narrato da Patrick Stewart

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (166 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
4 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854485
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

One last battle against evil, one final journey to the magical land of Narnia.

Narnia ... where the last king makes a stand and sad farewells turn to joy ... where the Adventure begins again.

The Unicorn says that humans are brought to Narnia only in time of greatest need -- and that time is now. The great Lion Aslan, the heart of Narnia, is missing. An impostor roams the land in his place, enslaving Aslan's loyal creatures and spreading treachery and lies. Only King Tirian and his small band of loyal followers are left to fight the last battle in this magnificent ending to The Chronicles of Narnia.

Performed by Patrick Stewart

Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854485
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

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Informazioni sull'autore

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a Fellow and Tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954, when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance Literature at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement. He wrote more than thirty books, allowing him to reach a vast audience, and his works continue to attract thousands of new readers every year. His most distinguished and popular accomplishments include Out of the Silent Planet, The Great Divorce, The Screwtape Letters, and the universally acknowledged classics The Chronicles of Narnia. To date, the Narnia books have sold over 100 million copies and have been transformed into three major motion pictures. Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) fue uno de los intelectuales más importantes del siglo veinte y podría decirse que fue el escritor cristiano más influyente de su tiempo. Fue profesor particular de literatura inglesa y miembro de la junta de gobierno en la Universidad Oxford hasta 1954, cuando fue nombrado profesor de literatura medieval y renacentista en la Universidad Cambridge, cargo que desempeñó hasta que se jubiló. Sus contribuciones a la crítica literaria, literatura infantil, literatura fantástica y teología popular le trajeron fama y aclamación a nivel internacional. C. S. Lewis escribió más de treinta libros, lo cual le permitió alcanzar una enorme audiencia, y sus obras aún atraen a miles de nuevos lectores cada año. Sus más distinguidas y populares obras incluyen Las Crónicas de Narnia, Los Cuatro Amores, Cartas del Diablo a Su Sobrino y Mero Cristianismo.

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4.6
166 valutazioni / 98 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    Great! Wrapped the entire story.
  • (5/5)
    I reread the Narnia series every year, and this last story in the series completes the annual 'fix'.
  • (4/5)
    I officially finished The Chronicles of Narnia! This series is definitely very interesting. On the surface it is a kids series about a place called Narnia, with a bunch of fun adventures. On a deeper level it is completely and utterly about Christian theology. The creation of Narnia, the belief in and ability of Aslan, the good and evil in the land and people, the place beyond Narnia, etc. This is Revelations retold as children's stories. I remember not liking The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe movie when it first came out because of it's obvious religious undertones throughout the whole story, but ~20 years later I am able to look at it and appreciate it for what it is and it didn't bother me as much. I am so glad I finally read this series.
  • (5/5)
    I cried at the end. Oh god I love this series!
  • (5/5)
    The Chronicles of Narnia really define my childhood in so many ways. I remember being read to at night before bed as my parents made their way through each of these books and my imagination went running rampant. I absolutely adored each one of these stories, the children and their tumbles into Narnia, the lessons that they learned from Aslan and his people, and the greater implications it had on me as a reader and human being. I adore British literature, and especially children's British literature from the master, C.S. Lewis!
  • (4/5)
    Not a review but just a few thoughts upon finishing this last of the Narnia series...What a sad book! Not only did the Narnians apparently lose their last battle with the Calormenes, Narnia itself is 'undone' by Aslan and all the Pevensies (except Susan), Eustace, Jill, Digory & Polly all died in England!! And despite Lewis's attempt to say that this wasn't sad at all but rather glorious, I couldn't stop wondering in the final section "What about Susan?" Peter, Edmund, Lucy are reunited with their parents & all their old friends. But what happens to Susan, the only survivor of this terrible train crash? I bet it isn't glorious for her...
  • (5/5)
    This is the last Chronicle of Narnia for which C. S. Lewis won the Carnegie Medal as the best book published for children in 1956. The battle is between King Tirian and the forces of evil, as represented by Shift the Ape and his poor dupe, Puzzle the donkey. Shift dresses Puzzle up as the great Aslan himself, corrupting the animals, slaughtering the talking trees and destroying the harmony of the kingdom. The children from the previous books return to Narnia to help and many other characters from previous stories make appearances as well. C. S. Lewis wrote no more fiction after this book, a great pity.
  • (5/5)
    I really liked how The Chronicles of Narnia was rounded off. It was nice to see everyone back together again, where they belonged. The overall moral story of this series is really unique and different to a lot of kids books. The real meaning of what Narnia was and who Aslan was, was really touching and well written.
  • (5/5)
    When I was a kid, I thought the story was just the last of the adventures in Narnia, however, when I reread it recently gave me goosebumps, Lewis actually showed us hidden meaning to each characters, places and events. Narnia is more than just an adventure.
  • (5/5)
    A crafty Ape named Shift finds a lion skin and, using it to cover a donkey named Puzzle, tricks him into masquerading as Aslan and the Talking Beasts of Narnia into following his whims, even going up against King Tirian.I'll be honest here... this book is probably one of the ones that had the most impact on my decision to be an English major. When I was 8-9 years old, I most often named it my favorite book. Okay so the plot is razor thin and choppy, and reading it as an adult I was a little disappointed at times that things didn't quite match my recollection. But as a kid...oh, as a kid I was so proud to have figured out some of the parallels between this book and prophecy in the Bible. Reading "between the lines" was new to me, and the ability to match one thing with another and see Lewis's interpretations of end times and heaven and the rest just fascinated me. I still love the last few chapters and the very last line especially gets me every time.
  • (2/5)
    Narnia 7.The end, at last. Fine children's books, but hardly as durable as Lord of the Rings?Read in Samoa Dec 2002
  • (2/5)
    I know people who have read and enjoyed the Narnia books without even really noticing the Christian theological subtext. Lewis made that hard to do with this one. It was impossible for me to avoid noticing his thinly disguised commentary on those who would conflate Jesus...er, Aslan with other, well, gods. And Lewis runs into the same problem as Dante did in Paradisio; it's much harder to describe heaven than hell (or at least hellish problems). Lewis does a lot of "the taste, sight, sound was indescribable if you've never experienced it..." Well, um, thanks. But that's why I'm reading the book. And I admit to a deep disagreement with Lewis' theology (though I respect his work and his creativity); he professes the "one way" of Christianity that led me to embrace the non-creedal religious community of Unitarian Universalism.
  • (5/5)
    Another classic tale from C.S. Lewis. Listened to the audio book on a road trip with my family - it made the time (and miles) fly. This is the final book of the Chronicles of Narnia.
  • (5/5)
    Last of the seven 'Narnia' chronicles. This is an exciting adventure with a fairly overt underlying message about the Christian doctrine of the End Times. Manipulative Shift the ape persuades the gentle donkey Puzzle to dress up and pretend to be someone else... disaster follows until two children from our world go to join King Tirian. Lovely ending.
  • (5/5)
    This book would be good to use when talking about the end of the world. I think students will like this because it is an integrating view of how the world might end.
  • (4/5)
    I'm surprised how little I remember this story. The only part I remembered was the end.

    A good conclusion to the Narnia novels.

  • (5/5)
    The book starts off with a jerk-face ape named Shift who persuades his friend, a donkey named Puzzle to wear the skin of a dead lion and pretend to be Aslan. Narnia is in trouble. Epic battles ensue. A few friend of Narnia make cameo appearances. Susan does not, because she's an average teenage girl and C.S. Lewis doesn't like teenage girls as they are more concerned with makeup and boys than God. Poor girl.Overall, this was a decent revist, with the exception of poor Susan's fate.
  • (4/5)
    The Last Battle was when the Christian undertones began to dawn on me, but even the religious and racist subtext couldn't ruin this book for me. If I didn't have so many problems with it, this would be my favorite Narnia book--as it is, it remains the one I am troubled by and yet return to, again and again.
  • (5/5)
    Amazing series, and an amazing book. There is very little else I can say that no one else has, but this book is wonderful, and a great conclusion to the series. These books always seem darker than books geared towards the young audience normally are. I, personally, loved how dark and deep the novel was, and although I still have trouble remembering or understanding all the details of the book, it still left an impact on me.
  • (4/5)
    Not my favorite, but oh so necessary to wrap up the series. I am totally disenchanted with the donkey and the ape, but then, I think I am meant to be. This seems to be a sad tale, but as with life, the end is only the beginning. I must admit that the end of the book is worth wading through the rest of it.
  • (4/5)
    The Chronicles of Narnia rightfully deserves its place among the greatest novels of all time. Smaller in scope than the Lord of the Rings, but not less influential, Lewis creates a world that wonderfully mirrors our own.
  • (2/5)
    See review for #2, "The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe."
  • (5/5)
    This book started out with adventure right from the beginning. I loved the whole Shift/Rishda/Tashlan thing that went on. It was so frustrating, but not in a bad way...frustrating in the sense that you just wanted to shake the Narnians that were falling for this because you knew what was actually going on. I didn't really King Tirian as much as I liked some of the other Narnian kings. He seemed a little cold and I didn't like how he was always trying to make the children feel like children in the sense that they shouldn't be fighting alongside with the rest of them for the sake of Narnia. However...the ending...blew me away. What amazing imagery! And I love love LOVED how all of the favorite characters of the previous books came back. It made me so sad that I was reaching the end of this wonderful series. I kinda saw the ending coming, as far as the last paragraph or so went, but that, by no means, took away the surprise that I felt actually finding out that I was right. This book, out of all of them, however, felt less like a children's book to me. I mean, I suppose I can see how this is still a children's book, but this book is also incredibly dark and deep...maybe too much so for a child to fully understand what C.S. Lewis was trying to get across. It was a little rough for me to hear about Susan's fate, although there were clues leading up to it throughout all of the books. Once again...this book was brimming with Christian metaphors and allegory. I could type pages and pages about everything that I found in this book. Although it all remained fairly obvious, this book can still be read as a simple story. Overall, I loved it...and I am so glad that this series ended the way that it did.
  • (1/5)
    I might be giving this 3 or 4 stars were it not for the penultimate paragraph of the book. My first Narnia book was The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. I did think the imagination and imagery striking but found the Christian Allegory too blatant. Friends told me however, that with the exception of The Last Battle, those aspects aren't so prominent, and that much of the series is wonder-full. So I found it from then on up to this book.Well, it could be said I'd been warned--but it actually wasn't the allegorical aspect per se that threw me. Maybe it's just I'd grown inured to that aspect by this book, or maybe that I'm not as familiar with Revelations as the Gospels, so I didn't feel like I was ticking off, oh, this is Judas, this is the crucifixion, etc. The story is rich in ideas, imagery and symbolism. I loved the echoes of Dante and Plato.On the whole, the issue of that last page aside, what disturbed me most was how the Calormenes were described. There have been accusations Narnia is racist because of how Lewis depicts this southern adversary of Narnia, and I think that unfair. I think we overuse the accusation "racist" so it loses it's impact when we use it other than to mean the belief that race defines character and ability. Lewis clearly does not believe this given positive Calormenes characters like Aravis and Emeth. In fact, I rather loved the message Lewis sends through Emeth--that it doesn't matter in whose name we do good or evil, whether Muhammad or Jesus--only that the act is good or evil. Nevertheless, it was disturbing to have Calormenes described this way: Then the dark men came round them in a thick crowd, smelling of garlic and onions, their white eyes flashing dreadfully in their brown faces. And then there are the repeated cries of "darkie" from the crowd of dwarfs. (Admittedly those particular dwarfs are villains in this book--not people to emulate--but I imagine reading those passages aloud to a child and I cringe).There's also, to borrow Gaiman's phrase, "The Problem of Susan." Susan, we find out early in the book, is no longer a "friend of Narnia" because she denies Narnia exists now and cares these days only about lipstick and nylons and such. I can rather forgive Lewis this. He's trying to make a point I think that even those who once knew the right way can drift away and forget what's truly important. I don't see misogyny in choosing Susan for that role anymore than it's anti-male to choose Edmund for the traitor role in The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe. Moreover, given the strong female characters in the Chronicles (especially Jill in this story) I find cries of sexism less than convincing.But then there's that last page...**SPOILERS BELOW***This is the next to last paragraph in the book and series:There was a real railway accident," said Aslan softly. "Your father and mother and all of you are--as you used to call it in the Shadowlands--dead. The term is over: the holidays have begun. The dream is ended: this is the morning."This reminded me of when my Grandmother died, the priest turned to me, my mother and aunt and rebuked us for weeping--because "she's now in a better place than you are." I know what I felt towards that priest in that moment as I looked at my mother's and aunt's stricken faces--rage. And then I thought of Susan--no longer "a friend of Narnia" dealing with the sudden violent deaths of her friends and family and I felt the same kind of rage at Lewis. Yes, I know--Christians believe Heaven this wonderful thing. And within the book and series the ending has its logic. But I for one felt slapped by that paragraph--I can't imagine wanting to give this to children, that one paragraph seems so malignant in its celebration of death. You guys giving this book five stars--you really want to give a child a book where dying young in a trainwreck with your entire family--parents, siblings, a cousin is the happy ending? Really?A friend told me about Gaiman's counter to this "The Problem of Susan"--it's in the short story anthology Fragile Things. That story has some disturbing imagery, and I know some that love Narnia have called it disgusting and "blasphemous." (Definitely not a story for children--adults only here.) All I can say is having come to the end of this series I found it cathartic. (And going back to reading Gaiman and Pratchett's Good Omens, about an angel and demon working to stop the apocalypse, can only help...)
  • (4/5)
    This book was about how Tirian, last king of Narnia, Eustace, and Jill fight against the calormens who are led by an evil ape named Shift. In the end, Aslan comes and destroys all Narnia. Everyone then goes to the "real" narnia where everything is perfect and they discover that the Narnia they knew was all fake.All and all it was a pretty good story.
  • (4/5)
    It is impossible for me to be objective about this book. Obviously the end of the Narnia-series, and the conclusion to seven books of fantastic story-telling. I had goosebumps while reading about half of it, and I'm not even sure why. I don't care one bit that it might have been a little cheesy, cliched at times, and preachy. It was a moving, worthy and brilliant end to a great series. Not that it needs saying, but it's hard not to imagine that the Chronicles of Narnia will still be read and enjoyed for hundreds of years to come.
  • (4/5)
    Incredibly imaginative and beautiful. If you are religious, you can enjoy the immense allegory in the series, if not, enjoy it for the marvel that it is.
  • (3/5)
    I never think I like the Last Battle until I read it. Still, with no new children to get to know and the average bland Narnian king, it's not the best in the series. The end is a little ghoulish at times (Haven't you guessed, children...).
  • (3/5)
    SUMMARY - In The Last Battle, The Chronicles of Narnia come to an end. The story is set during the reign of the last king of Narnia, King Tirian. Narnia has experienced a long period of peace and prosperity begun during the reign of King Caspian X. A centaur, Roonwit, warns Tirian that strange and evil things are happening to Narnia and that the stars portend ominous developments. An ape named Shift has persuaded a well-meaning but simple donkey called Puzzle to dress in a lion's skin and pretend to be the Great Lion Aslan. Shift, using Puzzle as his pawn, convinces the Narnians that he speaks for Aslan. Once the Narnians are convinced that Aslan has returned. When Tirian accuses the ape of lying, the Calormenes overpower the king and bind him to a tree. Tirian and his small force prepare to fight the Calormenes. All the animals are killed . Eustace, Jill and Poggin are thrown into the stable where the false Aslan was kept. Tirian, earlier on, had thrown Shift into the stable and Tash, who now haunts the stable, swallowed the ape whole. Later they enter an area called perfect narnia, and there they spend the rest of their days.REVIEW - The Last Battle brings the Narnia saga to its tragic and triumphant conclusion. It will not exactly be a spoiler to say that everyone basically ends up in Heaven at the end. While earlier Narnia volumes addressed themes of good-vs.-evil in a classical, mythic sense, this novel's first half jumps into darkness with both feet. The Last Battle is as serious as a heart attack in its early chapters, as Narnia itself succumbs to betrayal and evil. But such an approach is well suited to depicting the end of the world. I highly suggest this book to young readers looking for good, yet easy literature.
  • (5/5)
    The last edition is a great book and a very nice end to the series, while some see it as depressing and very well it might be if you stand back and take a look i think you might find and end to Narnia that is supposed to mirror our own, so read the last book it might just make you think.