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The Magician's Nephew

The Magician's Nephew

Scritto da C. S. Lewis

Narrato da Kenneth Branagh


The Magician's Nephew

Scritto da C. S. Lewis

Narrato da Kenneth Branagh

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (547 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
3 ore
Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854447
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

The secret passage to the house next door leads to a fascinating adventure.

The Magician's Nephew, the first book of The Chronicles of Narnia ... where the woods are thick and cool, where the Talking Beasts are called to life ... a new world where the adventure begins.

Digory and Polly meet and become friends one cold, wet summer in London. Their lives burst into adventure when Digory's Uncle Andrew, who thinks he is a magician, sends them hurtling to ... somewhere else. They find their way to Narnia, newborn from the Lion's song, and encounter the evil sorceress Jadis, before they finally return home.

Read by Kenneth Branagh

Editore:
Pubblicato:
May 24, 2005
ISBN:
9780060854447
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro

Informazioni sull'autore

Clive Staples Lewis (1898-1963) was one of the intellectual giants of the twentieth century and arguably one of the most influential writers of his day. He was a fellow and tutor in English Literature at Oxford University until 1954 when he was unanimously elected to the Chair of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge University, a position he held until his retirement.


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Recensioni

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4.6
547 valutazioni / 156 Recensioni
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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (5/5)
    It's 1 of my fav out of the series and should be read before The Lion, the Witch & Wardrobe.
  • (5/5)
    Read this!!!! It is so enchanting and an excellent book! I love all of C.S. Lewis' books!! I hope you love this as much as I do!
  • (5/5)
    The book itself is fantastic, but the narration is even more fantastic! This performer is really enjoyable to listen to!
  • (5/5)
    Timeless, in all the best ways. It reminds one of the simple joys of being a child.
  • (5/5)
    Great start to the Narnia series. Young or Old, it is a great read.
  • (5/5)
    C.S. Lewis has an amazing amaginateion! I am only 10 and my mother says that I have to read these before Harry Potter! I have only read this one time but it is the best book ever! It is the beginning and the end all in one!Every kid needs to read the magicians nephew! It is the best!
  • (3/5)
    when I listened it randomly cut out ,
    Same with horse and his boy

    People reading this ,
    You should most DEFINITELY read the lion the witch and the wardrobe first
  • (5/5)
    One of my favorite stories read by one of my favorite actors!!!!
  • (3/5)
    Excellent classic. Highly recommend to any children to read and experience the magic of Narnia.
  • (5/5)
    This book is the first of the series and it is very good although a bit more frightening than the rest. It is a great introduction to the world and the concept that there are many such worlds.
  • (3/5)
    Not half as interesting as the original book in the series, but prequels usually aren't, I guess.
  • (4/5)
    I read this whole series long ago. As a young adult, I think. I remember liking the stories but being annoyed by the aggressiveness of the religious allegory. Still have my set from then, and recently I put this on the shelf of books Jefferson chooses for his bedtime story.

    It was good. As we've read some recent books, I kept thinking that they didn't stand up to the Narnia series, and I was right. This was good, imaginative, and well-paced for reading aloud. Jefferson enjoyed it, and I think I actually enjoyed it more the second time around.

    I was shocked, though, when Jefferson didn't choose the next book in the series as his next bedtime book. Maybe he didn't like it quite as well as I thought? But maybe that's not it. He's never been as sequential a reader as I am.
  • (3/5)
    The first and last thirds of the book are entertaining but the bit with Aslan is too ham-fisted. The book is also a better prequel than start of a series.
  • (4/5)
    This is one of the more enjoyable books in the Narnia series because it tells the backstory behind the earlier books. The author had an interesting idea of what's involved in traveling between worlds like our own and Narnia. I found the two main characters (children from England several decades before the children in the other books) a bit boring, but they had interesting things to do. This isn't "Book 1" like it says in the GoodReads title, and it would be best to read the earlier books first in order to understand a lot of what is talked about in this one.
  • (3/5)
    This was always my least favorite of the Chronicles, mainly because I find the plot much less exciting than the other six books. I like the friendship between Polly and Digory, the Wood Between the Worlds, and the creation of Narnia.
  • (4/5)
    When I picked up all of the Chronicles of Narnia books, I wasn't quite sure I would even read them,and if I did, I wasn't sure I would like them.

    Well, I started this book not knowing what to think or expect, and I was pleasantly surprised. With the last four or five chapters, I listened to the audio-books online while reading the books to kind of help me get through the books a little faster and easier. Listening to the person who read the books made the books even better for me. I enjoyed the narrators reading tremendously. The voices he did for each character and how he didn't seem to just be reading it to get it over with.

    I had already seen the Chronicles of Narnia movie when it had first come out so I had a pretty good idea of who was who once certain characters began to show up in the book. But this book helped me to completely understand how things got to be where they were by the second book (the now movie).

    I am not sure when I will be going on in the series because I have so many other books that I want to get to and finish. But hopefully I will be able to get to it within the next few months or so (God willing). But, because I have a pretty good idea what takes place in Chronicles of Narnia> hopefully I will be able to enjoy the book as well. The times I have seen movies first, then read the books, I have enjoyed the book more than I did the movie...and for one Book & Movie situation, that's saying a lot because I loved the movie a lot.

    I am truly glad that I did push forward into reading this book, I really did enjoy it more than I expected to.
  • (3/5)
    I found this book rather tedious. It does not have the magic of some of the later books. It definitely feels like a hastily put together prequel.
  • (4/5)
    I did not fully enjoy this book at first. The plot was not well developed in the first 3/4 of the book. The end of the book was wonderful and I finally understood the plot. I enjoyed the world building aspects that the end of the book had. I also enjoyed the introduction to the next book that was at the end of this book. I want to continue reading the series, but I hope the rest of the series is better than this book.

    Rating: 3.5/5
  • (4/5)
    I really liked the characters and the story, despite the strong religious themes.
  • (5/5)
    The magicians nephew is about a girl named Polly and she meets up with this boy named Digory. They want to find out what is in the house next to Digory's. Their adventure begins then! They find out about some magic rings that can transport you to different worlds. They meet someone who is related to the next book in Narnia and meet a lion who is named Aslan. I love this book because it makes so much sense when you read the second after this one. I love how Polly and Dickory are so adventurous and end up having a totally magical adventure. They never knew magic really existed in hell now. I hope you read it too and enjoy it!
  • (5/5)
    Second book of ðe ſeries, a retroactive prequel explainiŋ ðe origins of Narnia and elements of Ðe Lion, ðe witch & ðe wardrobe.
  • (4/5)
    Eerie creation story. I like it much better than the apocalyptic "The Last Battle"
  • (4/5)
    It all started here, when the Magician's Nephew traveled to a world that was being created from a world that was abandoned. He awaken the witch and that will have consequences, but he also helped to build hope for the new world. Narnia is one of the places your heart visits and stays forever, once king of Narnia means Always king of Narnia. I think this is the version of the Bible that I enjoy the most, lovely characters simply and beautifully crafted. Lewis' use of language is rich and proper as expected from an English man. The reinterpretation of life's inception allows magic and philosophy take hold of your mind and full of love your heart. It's just that I love Narnian stories, and this one is about how it all started.
  • (4/5)
    Some things were GREAT about this book - the creation of Narnia, how the witch got to Narnia, of course - Aslan, Lantern Waste, how the Wardrobe came to be etc. etc. etc.
    And the writing was simply magical.

    But this book was great only because there are books to come after it (The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe being the next one) and I'm not sure I would have enjoyed it so much if I hadn't already read The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe.

    I am reading the books in the order that C.S. Lewis wanted them read in NOT the order they were published in so this is Book #1 in the series for me.

    Highly recommended
  • (4/5)
    I am using this book for my book group of eight year olds. They love it and I love it. The suspense is such that the kids want to go to the next chapter to see what happens. The girls identify with Polly and none of them like the witch who abuses her power when she has it. They like that the story takes them in to new, different and imagined worlds.
  • (4/5)
    This book was in the children's section of my church library, but it definitely appealed to me. Being familiar with The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, I was immediately enchanted with the very beginnings of the world of Narnia. C.S. Lewis is a master story teller and deft at the art of allegory.

    A friend of mine pointed out that, even though Lewis never fathered children, his ability to write with such tenderness and truth from a child's point of view is ... well, magical. You can easily see the Christian parallels here, and appreciate the truths therein.

    I wrote several favorite quotes:

    What you see and hear depends a good deal on where you are standing: it also depends on what sort of person you are.
    The trouble with trying to make yourself stupider than you really are is that you very often succeed.

    I highly recommend this one.
  • (4/5)
    I never did read this as a child, so to discover it with my son while finally sharing it with him was a thrill.
  • (3/5)
    When you and you'r family are on a long road trip and need a book series that everyone is willing to listen to (and you've already done a Harry Potter book series) you end up with the Narnia Chronicles. The last time I listened to these books was when my mother read them to me just before bedtime when I was six or seven. So granted, there is a lot of things I don't remember about this series. I can't say that I completely enjoyed this one as much as I had hoped. The christian influence was very heavy for me. I tried to convince myself that I should just look at it as a fantasy story - that's what it is after all. But religion has been on my mind a lot lately since I'm currently reading a book about religious delusions at the moment. I am, however, glad that I've getting this chance to go through these books again as an adult, to fully appreciate them for what they are.
  • (3/5)
    It takes place before the Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe. I know I read The Witch and The Wardrobe but I didn't remember this one. Here we learn about the beginning of Narnia and how the Wardrobe came to exist
  • (4/5)
    It's worth a read, although I'd say it's mostly exposition for the rest of the series.