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From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

Scritto da E.L. Konigsburg

Narrato da Jill Clayburgh


From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler

Scritto da E.L. Konigsburg

Narrato da Jill Clayburgh

valutazioni:
4.5/5 (185 valutazioni)
Lunghezza:
3 ore
Pubblicato:
Nov 24, 2009
ISBN:
9780743597166
Formato:
Audiolibro

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Descrizione

When suburban Claudia Kincaid decides to run away, she knows she doesn't just want to run from somewhere she wants to run to somewhere--to a place that is comfortable, beautiful, and preferably elegant. She chooses the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Knowing that her younger brother, Jamie, has money and thus can help her with the serious cash flow problem she invites him along.

Once settled into the museum, Claudia and Jamie, find themselves caught up in the mystery of an angel statue that the museum purchased at an auction for a bargain price of $250. The statue is possibly an early work of the Renaissance master Michelangelo, and therefore worth millions. Is it? Or isn't it? Claudia is determined to find out. This quest leads Claudia to Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler, the remarkable old woman who sold the statue and to some equally remarkable discoveries about herself.

Pubblicato:
Nov 24, 2009
ISBN:
9780743597166
Formato:
Audiolibro

Disponibile anche come...

Disponibile anche come libroLibro


Informazioni sull'autore

E.L. Konigsburg is the only author to have won the Newbery Medal and a Newbery Honor in the same year. In 1968, From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler won the Newbery Medal and Jennifer, Hecate, Macbeth, William McKinley, and Me, Elizabeth was named a Newbery Honor Book. Almost thirty years later she won the Newbery Medal once again for The View from Saturday. Among her other acclaimed books are Silent to the Bone, The Outcasts of 19 Schuyler Place, and The Mysterious Edge of the Heroic World.

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Recensioni dei lettori

  • (4/5)
    I remember this being one of my favorite books as a kid, I'm sure I read it several times, but couldn't remember anything about it. So, I decided it was time to read it again. How fun... now I understand why I liked it so much. I even remember taking it to the library and saying "I want more like this one." Art, mystery, adventure, curiosity... what's not to like?
  • (4/5)
    Claudia Kincaid decides to run away from home (no reason ever given) and takes her little brother James along. But she has planned carefully. They will hide out in the Metropolitan Museum of Art while they are on the lam. The museum has just acquired a smallish marble sculpture of an angel that may or may not be a lost work of Michelangelo. Claudia becomes obsessed with solving the mystery of Angel, which the museum purchased from a wealthy widow, Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.Most of the book is filled with the conversations and interactions between Claudia and James. It is those interactions that make the book. But the story is being told, not by one of the children, but by Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. One wonders as it goes along how she knows all these minute details about what happened when she wasn't around, but it all is clear in the end.
  • (4/5)
    Hilarious, whimsical, rather unrealistic, but still a ton of fun!
  • (4/5)
    A fabulous tale of children who take up residence in the Metropolitan Museum of Art for a time. Especially good for New Yorkers.
  • (5/5)
    Great kids book!
  • (5/5)
    Claudia and her younger brother Jamie run away from home seeking adventure. Since Claudia wanted her adventure to be comfortable, she decided that they would live in the Metropolitan Museum of Art. While there, she became determined to unravel the mystery of the statue of an angel.
  • (4/5)
    I love this book.
  • (3/5)
    Claudia knew that she could never pull off the old-fashioned kind of running away. That is, running away in the heat of anger with a knapsack on her back. She didn't like discomfort; even picnics were untidy and inconvenient: all those insects and the sun melting the icing on the cupcakes. Therefore, she decided that her leaving home would not be just running from somewhere but would be running to somewhere. To a large place, a comfortable place, an indoor place, and preferably a beautiful place. And that's why she decided upon the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.-Chapter 1 I loved this book as a kid. I remember thinking how amazing it would be to live in a museum or even a department store. This book actually holds up over time. It was fun to read and I was rooting for Claudia and Jamie.Claudia is a strong character and she fits in my grad school paper perfectly. She knows what she wants and she is determined to get it. Recommended to:Grades 3-5, girls and boys who like a realistic adventure.
  • (5/5)
    This story is about a young girl named Claudia who wants to run away. She runs away to the Metropolitan Museum and has the best adventures.Coming of age of girls4-6
  • (4/5)
    It's a different experience, reading this as an adult, with a lot more books under my belt. Two things stood out for me this time - 1. why did they never have to dodge the janitor, esp. of the bathroom? and 2. what kind of story would it have been without the mystery of the Angel & could a simpler story about a couple of runaways, one seeking to Become and one seeking a little adventure, have been successful?

    In fact, if you know a good story about kids who run away more from issues of the psyche than from abuse, please comment below.
  • (3/5)
    Claudia and her brother Jamie runs away from home and decides to live in The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. They find out the daily routine of the place and are soon wrapped up in a mystery about a new statue at the museun - whether it is really a genuine Michelangelo or not. The first Newbery award book that didn't capture my attention. It was the narration that irritated me and also the children without any concern for their parents just running away annoyed me.
  • (4/5)
    Claudia is planning to run away. She wants a different life, than that of the oldest child, with so many responsibilities. Her brother Jamie doesn't know it yet, but she has chosen him to be her companion. One reason she has chosen Jamie, is because he is good with money. Claudia usually spends her money on hot fudge sundaes, but Jamie has saved over twenty dollars.Claudia plans for them to take a train to New York City, and stay in the Metropolitan Museum of Fine Arts. Hiding out, being hungry most of the time, and walking in order to save money, the two children experience the adventure of a lifetime. They also get involved in the mystery of an angel statue, which was sold to the museum by Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. Could the angel statue be a real Michelangelo? Only Mrs. Frankweiler knows for sure
  • (5/5)
    Still one of my favorites. First read when I was young, and I love it everytime I reread.
  • (5/5)
    I loved this book! It had adventure and mystery. I never read it as a child but as a student teacher I feel it would be a great book for students to read. Since children are the main characters in the book it would be easy for students to relate to the characters. I believe students would be so curious as to what happens next. There is a suspense factor of whether or not they will ever be caught. This would be a good book to suggest students read during silent reading or at home. I would love to read it as a class too!
  • (4/5)
    Adorable story. I picked it up based on a review making my fandom-addled mind think, "This is clearly a book that would have delighted a young Neal Caffrey," and I think I wasn't wrong. This was the 35th anniversary edition with an afterword in which the author says "I am not yet as old as Mrs Frankweiler"; it's satisfying that she did end up not only reaching but passing that age.
  • (3/5)
    This book has a cute idea, but I found it not as interesting as The View from Saturday. There were incredible coincidences and much description of children of privilege.
  • (3/5)
    I thoroughly enjoyed From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. It was original, funny, and creative! The "mystery" element will definitely keep you on your toes! It definitely deserved the Newberry it received.

    The characters were very well done. They all had some depth and personality to them, and I could feel for them. They were each so unique, yet so realistic. I especially loved the relationship between Jamie and Claudia! :D

    I thought the plot was solid, and very well done. It was realistic, yet it had a bit of a mystery in it as well (which, I must say, was very well done!)
    I also liked how E.L. Konigsburg had such a unique narrator. At first, I was surprised she didn't chose a 1st person narration via either Jamie or Claudia, but at the end of the story I realized that, yes, indeed she did have a 1st person narration...just not from the person I was expecting! (I actually thought this was quite clever!)

    All in all, I highly recommend this story to anyone who is looking for a great realistic fiction story. I highly believe that From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler will be a classic, for both adults and children alike, for years and years to come.
  • (5/5)
    this is my favorite book from childhood and a rare deserving winner (imho) of the newbury medal. i love it and i think every young girl who thinks her life is a bore and she's taken for granted should tuck this book away for a rainy day. it's terrific!
  • (3/5)
    I never read this as a kid, for whatever reason. I was probably too busy re-reading Broom Hilda collections (because, I guess, I was that kid). Anywho, a few months ago I had a dream with this book in it, not the plot, just someone referenced the book. So I decided that was my brain telling me to read it. Plus I'm interested in reading Newberry Medal books, at least the ones that were published before I was around 13 or so. Anywho, I liked it. I was a little put off about how cavalier they both were with leaving their parents to worry ... but it's fun.
  • (4/5)
    When I heard about E.L. Konigsburg's death last week, I was sure I'd never read any of her novels. But as soon as I started reading this book, it felt familiar. Some piece of my brain must remember reading this as a kid. Even as an adult, I could relate to Claudia -- she just wants something different. At times, I think we've all felt it. Great book, great charcters.
  • (3/5)
    Hmmph. I don't like it. Mostly because a) I don't think much of either Claudia or James, and b) the way it's written, with random interjections from Mrs Frankweiler, is highly annoying. I never got caught up in the story at all, and never really got interested. I'm glad I read it, because of references to it elsewhere, but I doubt I'll ever reread. I liked Wonderstruck a lot better - they were actually interesting and interested. Though the bit about the value of secrets, near the end, was good.
  • (4/5)
    I like that this book had a backstory to it and seemed to be rather involved. I was intrigued from the beginning and wanted to figure out how Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler was involved with the rest of the story. I really identified with Claudia because she reminded me of myself as a child. Although I'll admit that the beginning was a more interesting read for me than the latter parts, I still enjoyed the book. Jamie and Claudia are very relatable and clever, and I could see children getting really sucked into this novel.
  • (5/5)
    I have no idea how this book managed to escape my attention for so long. As a child I was obsessed with the Met due to the movie Don't Eat the Pictures. I couldn't have written a more interesting book for myself.

    I loved Koningsburg descriptions of New York and the Met. Claudia and Jamie were such smart and self assured kids. Their voices were so very realistic, I loved thier sibling squables and the way they pulled together when it was nessicary.

    The idea of them running off, while it would have appealed to me as a kid, it makes my heart drop now. I'm glad that the book is older and that the kids are definatly of their time.
  • (4/5)
    Lovely children's book from the sixties about two children that run away from home to stay at the Met Museum.
  • (3/5)
    Premise was pretty good and the story was entertaining. However, the language and actions of the two main characters, Jamie and Claudia Kincaid, are quite dated. (Ex: The New York Times costs the $0.10). Though the idea of living in a museum captures the imagination, I feel that the author did not incorporate enough of the cool things the children could have done or explored in the Museum. I don't know that kids of this generation would understand a lot of the lingo and behaviour of these children of the 60s.
  • (4/5)
    My son and I both enjoyed reading this; I was revisiting a childhood favorite. Even after all these years, I vividly remembered the scene where they got money out of the fountain. Running away and hiding out in a museum always sounded like the perfect adventure.
  • (4/5)
    When I was in junior high school, I had an idea to write a book about a couple of kids running away from their home in suburban Connecticut, taking the train to New York City, and settling in for some adventures. I made a few attempts at starting the book but the idea never translated to the page. Which is a good thing, because if I had written that book it would have been accused of being totally derivative of From the Mixed-up files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler. The story is about a brother and sister from Connecticut who take a train to New York and (in an interesting twist I hadn't considered) move into the Metropolitan Museum of Art. It's a good story that's a mix of adventure and mystery with a lesson for children coming of age. Jill Clayburgh does an excellent job narrating the story as well. Now that I've caught up on another book I never read as a child I must endeavor to make sure my kids read it too.
  • (4/5)
    I probably read this as a kid, but I didn't really remember it, so I read it again. A good read.
  • (4/5)
    Somehow I missed this one when I was growing up, but thankfully one of the online bookclubs that I belong to chose it for a children's lit pick. It was a quick read & quite enjoyable, I know that I would have enjoyed it as a child as well. I liked Konigsburg's style quite a bit, writing as Frankweiler's retelling of the children's story. Of course, reading today, you think of all the security technology (cameras, etc) that would no longer permit their fun and creative choice of a hide out :)
  • (4/5)
    This book talks about a brother and sisters journey to a museum by themselves. The book shows how they leant from this trip on their own. The book is great for children because it shows independence as well as adventure. The book keeps you wanting more and continually turning the page. The age group for this book would be 10-12.