NPR

Twitter's 'Birdwatch' Aims to Crowdsource Fight Against Misinformation

Twitter is turning to its users to help find and flag misinformation with a new pilot program called Birdwatch, combining crowdsourcing and consensus.
Twitter's new pilot program Birdwatch aims to enlist the social network's users to fact check each other's tweets. Source: Twitter/Screenshot by NPR

Twitter users aren't known for staying quiet when they see something that's flat out wrong, or with which they disagree. So why not harness that energy to solve one of the most vexing problems on social media: misinformation?

With a new pilot program called Birdwatch, Twitter is hoping to crowdsource the fact-checking process, eventually expanding it to all 192 million daily users.

"I think ultimately over time, [misleading information] is a problem best solved by the people using Twitter itself," CEO Jack Dorsey said on a quarterly investor call on Tuesday.

With Birdwatch, users provide context and information, linked directly below a questionable tweet.

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