Taste of the South

Best-Ever Yeast Breads

SATSUMA SWEET ROLLS

Juicy Southern satsumas pack these rolls with sweet-tart flavor, but mandarin or clementine oranges will work just as well.

MAKES 10

DOUGH

¼ cup warm water (105° to 110°)
1 (0.25-ounce) package active dry yeast
3½ cups all-purpose flour
¼ cup granulated sugar
1½ teaspoons kosher salt
¾ cup whole milk
1 large egg, lightly beaten
6 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened

FILLING

¼ cup unsalted butter, softened
⅓ cup firmly packed light brown sugar
⅔ cup orange or satsuma marmalade

GLAZE

¼ cup whole milk
2 ounces cream cheese, softened
2¼ cups confectioners’ sugar
1½ teaspoons finely grated orange zest

1. For dough: In a small bowl, combine ¼ cup warm water and yeast. Let stand until mixture is foamy, about 5 minutes.

2. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook attachment, combine flour, granulated sugar, and salt. With mixer on low speed, add yeast mixture, milk, egg, and butter. Increase mixer speed to medium, and beat until dough comes together. Continue beating until dough is smooth and elastic, about 7 minutes.

3. Spray a large bowl with cooking spray. Place dough in bowl, turning to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free place (75°) until doubled in size, about 1 hour and 30 minutes.

4. Gently punch down dough. On a lightly floured surface, roll dough into a 14x10-inch rectangle.

5. For filling: Spread softened butter onto dough. In a small bowl, stir together brown sugar and marmalade. Spread sugar mixture over butter; gently press mixture into dough. Starting with one long side, roll dough into a log; pinch seam to seal. Place log seam side down, and cut into 10 rolls.

6. Spray a 3-quart baking dish with cooking spray. Place rolls in prepared pan. Cover and let rise in a warm, draft-free place (75°) until doubled in size, 45 to 60 minutes.

7. Preheat oven to 350°. Uncover rolls. Bake until golden brown, 30 to 35 minutes. Let cool slightly.

For glaze: In a medium bowl, whisk together milk and

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