TIME

When COVID doesn’t go away

KAYLA BRIM LAUGHED WHEN SHE learned it could take 10 days to get her COVID-19 test results back. “I thought, O.K., well, within 10 days I should be fine,” she remembers.

That was on July 2. More than a month later, Brim is still far from fine.

Before the pandemic, the 28-year-old from Caldwell, Idaho, juggled homeschooling her two kids with her work as a makeup artist—she was supposed to open her own salon in July. Now, she suffers daily from shortness of breath, exhaustion, excruciating headaches, brain fog, neuropathy, high blood pressure, and loss of taste and smell. She feels like “a little old lady,” completely knocked out by simple tasks like making lunch for her children. She’s working just enough to help pay the bills and the lease on her empty salon, but she has no idea when she’ll be able to work full-time again, and no idea how she and her husband will manage financially if she can’t. “Half of my day is spent trying to sleep, and the other half of it is trying to pretend like I’m O.K.—and I don’t know when I’ll be O.K.,” Brim says.

This is “long haul” COVID-19. Even young, healthy people

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da TIME

TIME2 min lettiCrime & Violence
News Ticker
Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro issued four presidential decrees on Feb. 12 that loosen limits on buying and owning guns. Hunters may now own up to 30 guns. A 2019 poll found that 70% of Brazilians opposed relaxing gun laws, which critics say will fuel viole
TIME6 min lettiCrime & Violence
The Call That I Always Have To Answer
“HELLO. THIS IS A COLLECT CALL FROM… [SOME VOICE that sounded like my brother’s], a prisoner at the Michigan Department of Corrections. If you feel you are being victimized or extorted by this prisoner, call customer service at [some number rattled o
TIME10 min lettiPoverty & Homelessness
The Crisis Around The Corner
IN LATE NOVEMBER, RIAN DE LAAT REACHED THE END OF HER ROPE. OVER THE PAST YEAR, HER MOM HAD RECEIVED A CANCER DIAGNOSIS, HER DAD HAD UNDERGONE MAJOR SURGERY, AND de Laat, 44, had been laid off from her job at a biotech startup. But her chief concern