Taste of the South

Generations of Junior League Cookbooks

n nearly every kitchen sits a worn spiral-bound cookbook. You know the one—the tattered, dog-eared book passed down from your grandmother to your mother, containing batter-splattered pages of recipes scribbled with notes. The recipe from Betty at church, whose meat loaf is topped with that addictive tomato gravy. Your aunt’s neighbor’s famous lemon Bundt, starred and circled so you know it’s the right one. The casserole that’s always eaten first at potlucks. These are the recipes that tell the stories of communities, time stamps of days and people of the past. And in

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Taste of the South1 min lettiLeadership
Taste Of The South
EDITOR Sarah Ward MANAGING EDITOR Whitney Durrwachter ASSOCIATE EDITOR Georgia Clarke SENIOR COPY EDITOR Rhonda Lee Lother COPY EDITOR Adrienne Davis EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Daniel Dubuisson CONTRIBUTING WRITER Nneka M. Okona CREATIVE DIRECTOR/PHOTOGRAPH
Taste of the South2 min lettiRegional & Ethnic
Baking How-Tos
WET TO DRY Adding wet ingredients into the dry ingredients helps create a smooth batter with less mixing, guarding against clumps of flour and cornmeal baked into the bread. MIX JUST UNTIL COMBINED “Just until combined” means you should stop mixing t
Taste of the South2 min lettiRegional & Ethnic
Editor’s Letter
I’VE BEEN EXCITED TO SHARE THIS ISSUE with you! If there’s a food group that Southerners know well, it’s definitely bread. Sunday suppers and celebration dinners always have a spot reserved for the breadbasket. Holiday mornings and leisurely weekends