Apple Magazine

ZOOM GOT BIG FAST. THEN VIDEOBOMBERS MADE IT REWORK SECURITY

Back in March as the coronavirus pandemic gathered steam in the U.S., a largely unheralded video-conferencing service suddenly found itself in the spotlight.

And just as quickly as Zoom became a household name for connecting work colleagues, church and school groups, friends, family, book clubs and others during stay-at-home lockdowns, it also gained a reputation for lax security as intrusive “videobombers” barged into private meetings or just spied on intimate conversations.

On April 1,

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