The Atlantic

Quarantine Fatigue Is Real

Instead of an all-or-nothing approach to risk prevention, Americans need a manual on how to have a life in a pandemic.
Source: Michael Nagle / Redux

In the earliest years of the HIV epidemic, confusion and fear reigned. AIDS was still known as the “gay plague.” To the extent that gay men received any health advice at all, it was to avoid sex. In 1983, the activists Richard Berkowitz and Michael Callen, with guidance from the virologist Joseph Sonnabend, published a foundational document for their community, called “How to Have Sex in an Epidemic.” Recognizing the need for pleasure in people’s lives, the pamphlet rejected abstinence as the sole approach and provided some of the earliest guidance on safer sex for gay men, including recommendations about condoms and which sex acts had a lower or higher risk for disease transmission.

Public-health experts have known for decades that an abstinence-only message . It , either. Likewise, asking Americans to abstain

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