Los Angeles Times

Air pollution linked to higher coronavirus death rates

LOS ANGELES - Americans in communities with higher smog levels are at greater risk of dying from COVID-19, according to a new study that suggests the health damage from the novel coronavirus has been worsened by long-term exposure to air pollution.

Scientists at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health analyzed data on more than 3,000 U.S. counties to link small increases in long-term exposure to fine-particle pollution to substantially higher death rates from the coronavirus.

Researchers calculated long-term average levels of fine-particle pollution - lung-damaging soot also known as PM2.5 - from 2000 to 2016 and compared

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