Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Quarterly

True Practice Is Never Disengaged

OWADAYS I WAKE UP even earlier than usual to check the news. It’s an obsession but it feels like a duty; I’m a sentry in a war zone, scanning the horizon for smoke and fire. Threats multiply every day. Environmentally, socially, politically, and technologically, the world seems locked in a death spiral. I feel overwhelmed and, to be honest, complicit. What have I done

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Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Quarterly5 min letti
Book Briefs
In The First Free Women: Poems of the Early Buddhist Nuns (Shambhala 2020), Matty Weingast reinterprets the Therigatha, a collection of poems by the earliest female students of the Buddha. Taking poetic license from the Pali originals, Weingast trans
Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Quarterly17 min letti
Awareness, from the Moment You Wake Up
A MEDITATOR’S JOB is to remember to be aware. Whether you are standing, sitting, lying down, or walking, if you remember that you are aware, then you are meditating, and you are cultivating the positive qualities of the mind. We always start with awa
Buddhadharma: The Practitioner's Quarterly16 min letti
What If Our Ordinary Experience Is All That Matters?
EACH TIME I sit down on a cushion and pay attention to what is happening, I find myself utterly incapable of putting whatever it is I’m experiencing into words. There’s something about the practice of meditation, be it Seon or any exercise in which w