HEIRLOOM GARDENER

Heirloom Gardener Bookshelf

ORGANIC GARDENING

The Heirloom Life Gardener

Tired of genetically modified food? Every day, Americans are moving more toward eating natural, locally grown food that is free of pesticides and preservatives ... and there is no better way to ensure this than to grow it yourself. Anyone can start a garden, whether in a backyard or on a city rooftop; but what you need to truly succeed is The Heirloom Life Gardener, a comprehensive guide to cultivating heirloom vegetables. From seed collecting to the history of seed varieties and name origins, Jere and Emilee Gettle take you far beyond the heirloom tomato. #5823 $29.99

Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land

Because climatic uncertainty has now become the new normal, many farmers, gardeners, and orchard-keepers in North America are desperately seeking ways to adapt their food production. This book draws upon the wisdom and technical knowledge from desert farming traditions all around the world. #6607 $29.95

The Market Gardener

Growing on just 1.5 acres, Jean-Martin Fortier and Maude-Hélène Desroches feed more than 200 families through

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Wrap up your harvest with the Bee’s Wrap Variety Pack, a flexible assortment of reusable food wraps made with organic cotton fabric, and covered in a thin coating of beeswax, organic jojoba oil, and tree resin. There are four different wrap sizes in
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Cool-Climate Orchids
AS THE TERM IMPLIES, cool-growing orchids originate in temperate climates and at high elevations, where they’re frequently cooled by cloud cover, but they also do well in warmer conditions. One such group of orchids is that of the genus Disa, which g