HEIRLOOM GARDENER

Heirloom Gardener Bookshelf

ORGANIC GARDENING

The Heirloom Life Gardener

Tired of genetically modified food? Every day, Americans are moving more toward eating natural, locally grown food that is free of pesticides and preservatives ... and there is no better way to ensure this than to grow it yourself. Anyone can start a garden, whether in a backyard or on a city rooftop; but what you need to truly succeed is The Heirloom Life Gardener, a comprehensive guide to cultivating heirloom vegetables. From seed collecting to the history of seed varieties and name origins, Jere and Emilee Gettle take you far beyond the heirloom tomato. #5823 $29.99

Growing Food in a Hotter, Drier Land

Because climatic uncertainty has now become the new normal, many farmers, gardeners, and orchard-keepers in North America are desperately seeking ways to adapt their food production. This book draws upon the wisdom and technical knowledge from desert farming traditions all around the world. #6607 $29.95

The Market Gardener

Growing on just 1.5 acres, Jean-Martin Fortier and Maude-Hélène Desroches feed more than 200 families through

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da HEIRLOOM GARDENER

HEIRLOOM GARDENER5 min letti
Backyard Buffet
THE BEST WAY TO PROVIDE food for wildlife is to preserve and restore the local native plant communities that have supported them for thousands of years. However, you can use feeders to supplement the natural food typically provided through native pla
HEIRLOOM GARDENER6 min lettiCookbooks, Food, & Wine
Captivating CARDOONS
WHEN IT COMES TO PLANTS that make a statement, few compare with cardoon. A stately ornamental edible topped with an otherworldly looking thistle, cardoon (Cynara cardunculus) is a beauty to behold. It’s a close cousin to the artichoke (C. scolymus),
HEIRLOOM GARDENER4 min letti
THE HONEY-BERRY A Subzero Hero
LIVING IN NORTHERN MINNESOTA has afforded our family an idyllic Mother Earth News lifestyle for over 40 years — with one exception. Our long, harsh, ultracold winters have made growing fruit downright difficult. Although berry pickers from around the