Civil War Times

NORTH AND SOUTH BEHIND BARS

ANGELA ZOMBEK, assistant professor of history at University of North Carolina-Wilmington, grew interested in military prisons during a visit to Camp Chase, a Union facility in Ohio. Over time, her studies turned to the 19th-century penitentiary movement, where incarcerated criminals were subjected to solitary confinement and conditions designed to evoke penitence and rehabilitation. How that tradition influenced Union and Confederate military prisons during the crisis of the Civil War is the subject of her book Penitentiaries, Punishment, and Military Prisons.

CWT: Tell me about the pre-Civil War state of prisons.

Long term imprisonment developed at the turn of the 19th century when the middle

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