Cruising World

1 CREW TO GO

1 Hitching Rides PAGE 51

2 A Pro Refits His Nav Station PAGE 54

3 Total Disconnect PAGE 57

VOYAGING

Two years ago, I was on a voyage to the fiords of southern New Zealand as crew aboard Sahula, a 40-foot Van de Stadt cutter owned by an Australian singlehander, David Haigh. He had been voyaging for 10 years and was just a few thousand miles from completing a circumnavigation that had started in Townsville, Australia. During that time, Haigh sailed with various crew he picked up along the way who were on board for up to three months at a time. Despite sailing solo for long stretches, Haigh never crossed an ocean alone.

Coincidentally, a few months later, while we were waiting for a break in the weather at Doubtful Sound, Fiordland, I met Ralph Robe-Curry, another Australian with extensive cruising experience. Robe-Curry had five “pickup” crew with him on Bomoh, his S&S-designed 52-foot sloop. I found Haigh’s and Robe-Curry’s experiences interesting. Each had different ways of selecting their crew, and handling the finances and voyage details. But each agreed that being a single sailor should not be used as an excuse to put off cruising. And their lessons apply to anyone—couples or even families—looking to add a hand or two for transoceanic trips.

Only one obstacle lay in the way when, at 60 years of age,

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