The Guardian

When did we become so bad at friendship? | Johanna Leggatt

It’s not that we have stopped communicating with friends. In fact, we’re all in constant contact, if that is what you would call it
‘Many people struggle to put away their mobile phone for the length of a dinner party, which, unless you’re waiting on a genuinely important call, is akin to giving your date the middle finger.’ Photograph: Rawpixel/Getty Images/iStockphoto

Occasionally I will get a nagging sense that I am missing a fundamental piece of me. It’s as if I have misplaced a crucial something along the way, but I’m not quite sure where, or how far back, I dropped it.

Weeks will pass until eventually I find myself engrossed in a face-to-face catch-up with a friend; a conversation that bypasses pleasantries and verbal backfill, where new worlds and possibilities seem to open up and schedules slip away.

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da The Guardian

The Guardian5 min letti
Revealed: The Huge British Property Empire Of Sheikh Mohammed
The controversial ruler of Dubai has acquired a land and property empire in Britain that appears to exceed 40,000 hectares (100,000 acres), making him one of the country’s largest landowners, according to a Guardian analysis. The huge property portfo
The Guardian7 min letti
Prince Philip: In Youth And Age, The Right Man For The Times
The first mention of Prince Philip in this newspaper came with the announcement of his engagement to the future queen on 13 July, 1947. It is a measure of the privacy that the royals then enjoyed that no gossip or rumour of their years of courtship h
The Guardian6 min lettiPolitics
Rockin' In The Free World? Inside The Rightwing Takeover Of Protest Music
“Did you know that Born in the USA is actually an anti-Vietnam war anthem?” Since Donald Trump embraced the 1984 Bruce Springsteen song during rallies, the lyrics have prompted so much explanation it now borders on cliche. Yet it’s no less unsettling