History of War

EDWARD COURTNEY BOYLE

“LIEUTENANT-COMMANDER E.C. BOYLE IN E14 WAS NOW ALONE … AT DAWN ON APRIL 27 … HE RAN PAST CHANAK ON THE SURFACE, WITH ALL THE FORTS FIRING ON HIM”
Naval Operations, Sir Julian S. Corbett, 1921
“IN SPITE OF GREAT NAVIGATIONAL DIFFICULTIES … AND OF THE HOURLY DANGER OF ATTACK FROM THE ENEMY, HE … SUCCEEDED IN SINKING TWO TURKISH GUNBOATS AND ONE LARGE MILITARY TRANSPORT”
VC Citation, London Gazette, 21 May 1915

native of Carlisle Edward Courtney Boyle was already an experienced sailor by the outbreak of the First World War. He had entered HMS Britannia in 1897 becoming a midshipman the following year. A keen sportsman Boyle was particularly noted for his skills as a competitive rugby player. He was also an early member of the Royal Navy’s Submarine Service when, in July 1904, he was sent to join the submarine depot ship HMS Thames in order to receive instruction as a sub-lieutenant. Within five

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