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Physics Nobel spotlights scientists who discovered exoplanets and the recipe for the universe

An artist's rendering of the 51 Pegasi B exoplanet migrating toward its sun. Fifty percent larger than Jupiter, it was first discovered by Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz in 1995.
An artist's rendering of the 51 Pegasi B exoplanet migrating toward its sun. Fifty percent larger than Jupiter, it was first discovered by Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz in 1995. (NASA/)

Early Tuesday morning, the 2019 Nobel Prize in Physics went to American cosmologist Jim Peebles for his "theoretical discoveries in physical cosmology," and to Swiss scientists Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz for their discovery of an "exoplanet orbiting a solar-type star."

The prize united two distinct fields of research—cosmology and astronomy—on the basis of the shared guiding

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