The Atlantic

How to Write the Book No One Wants You to Write

Sarah M. Broom’s The Yellow House is a feat—a memoir and historical narrative created amid governmental bureaucracy and resistance from some of her subjects.
Source: Adam Shemper / skye studios / Unsplash / Katie Martin / The Atlantic

Sarah M. Broom was writing long before Hurricane Katrina. What would ultimately become her memoir, The Yellow House, started as a collection of notes and essays on the house she grew up in, her family, her neighbors, and her local community in New Orleans. She began in the late 1990s after leaving home for college, and it eventually became impossible for her to see the work as anything other than a book project: a family portrait and a history of New Orleans, which would explore the larger social narrative of the United States.

While it’s impossible to underscore Hurricane Katrina’s impact on her family and the city at large, Broom’s hope with is to reveal the ways in which Katrina was no singular catastrophe. “When we boil Katrina down to a weather event, we really miss the point,” Broom told me recently over the phone. “It’s so

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Interessi correlati

Altro da The Atlantic

The Atlantic4 min lettiPolitics
Devin Nunes Is Living in a Fantasyland
The representative’s claims about stories reporting on the Trump administration are part of a universe of untruth.
The Atlantic7 min letti
‘I Felt I Didn’t Deserve to Be Unapologetically Joyous’
Kesha opens up about being back to party-animal mode despite her ongoing struggle with the producer Dr. Luke.
The Atlantic6 min lettiPolitics
The Weird Scenario That Pits President Pelosi Against Citizen Trump in 2020
A consistent reading of the Constitution suggests that the current process of succession is constitutional—and that barring Trump from running again would not be.