The Atlantic

The U.S. Is About to Do Something Big on Hong Kong

Protests there have demonstrated the enduring appeal of American values and power. But can Washington live up to that promise?
Source: Anushree Fadnavis / Reuters

Hong Kong’s pro-democracy protest movement, the David to China’s Goliath, is calling out to the land of the free for help—and help may be on the way. The question is whether it will be substantial enough and fast enough, and have the support of the president of the United States.

For months now, a small but zealous contingent of American flag-waving protesters has been a fixture of the huge demonstrations in Hong Kong, including today, when dozens of people again carried the U.S. flag during a rally held in defiance of a police ban. As the struggle to resist China’s tightening grip on the semiautonomous region has intensified, protesters have appealed to the United States in larger numbers and with greater urgency. Last weekend, tens of thousands of protesters marched near the U.S. consulate in the territory, singing “The Star-Spangled Banner” and carrying signs that urged President Donald Trump to “liberate Hong Kong.” Perhaps more realistically, they also issued a practical plea: for Congress to pass the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act, which would grant the United States further means to defend the territory’s freedoms and autonomy.

Faced with Trump’s scattershot approach to the ferment in Hong Kong, which doesn’t

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da The Atlantic

The Atlantic8 min lettiScience
What Ballooning Carbon Emissions Will Do to Trees
Many forecasts for climate change assume that tropical forests will continue to soak up carbon dioxide as the world warms. What if they don’t?
The Atlantic3 min letti
A Man Moves Into a Lighthouse. Strangeness Ensues.
Robert Eggers’s new film, starring Robert Pattinson and Willem Dafoe, is an enthralling exploration of the mania of isolation.
The Atlantic5 min lettiSociety
A Strange New Culprit Behind Eating Disorders
Common infections such as strep throat might have a mysterious link to anorexia and bulimia.