Eat Well

Pilafs

Chicken & Pomegranate

 Pilaf

Recipe / Lisa Holmen

This pilaf is one of my all-time favourites. I love the fresh herbs and burst of freshness from the pomegranate. It’s a great way of using up any fresh herbs you may have in the fridge, but

I recommend using a mix of fresh parsley and mint, which pairs perfectly with the zest of the lemon.

Serves: 2

1 tbsp olive oil
1 brown onion, finely chopped
2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
4 chicken thighs, diced
175g basmati rice
Zest 1 lemon
½ tsp ground cinnamon ½ tsp ground cumin
375mL chicken stock
1 bunch flat-leaf parsley & mint, chopped
1 pomegranate, seeded
Lemon wedges, to serve

Heat olive oil in large saucepan over medium heat. Add onion and cook for few mins until translucent. Add garlic and cook until aromatic. Add chicken and cook for 5 mins until golden.

Add rice to pan and stir to coat. Add lemon zest, cinnamon and cumin.

Stir in chicken stock and bring to boil. Cover pan with lid and reduce heat.

Cook for 15 mins, covered, until all liquid is absorbed. Remove from heat and rest for another 10 mins with lid on. Toss with fresh herbs and pomegranate and serve immediately with lemon wedges.

Mushroom Pilaf with Brown Rice

Recipe / Lisa Holmen

This pilaf is the perfect winter comfort food, loaded with

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