NPR

Iran Under Sanctions: A Scramble For Cancer Care And Blame To Go Around

Shortages affecting hospitals and clinics are a perilous example of an economic crisis that has worsened since the U.S. imposed economic and financial penalties on the country.
Cancer patients receive chemotherapy treatment at Roshana Cancer Center, a private clinic in western Tehran. Source: Marjan Yazdi for NPR

At a cancer treatment center in Iran's capital of Tehran, a doctor's fight to treat her cancer patients has become harder. As U.S. sanctions sink in, the flow of medicine and medical supplies in Iran appears to have slowed — and the reasons are difficult to pin down.

Dr. Mastaneh Sanei, an oncologist at the Roshana Cancer Center, says she's treating patients without the benefits of consistently functioning equipment and a reliable supply of drugs.

With the right treatment, she says, "you may not cure these patients, but they have the chance to prolong survival."

The shortages affecting Iran's hospitals and clinics are a particularly perilous example of an economic crisis that has worsened since the Trump administration reimposed economic sanctions on the country. The offered Iran economic relief in exchange for limiting its nuclear program, but the U.S. withdrew from the agreement

Stai leggendo un'anteprima, registrati per continuare a leggere.

Altro da NPR

NPR4 min letti
'Exalting The Banal To The Monumental' Through California Skate Parks
The state that gave birth to modern skateboarding is home to concrete playgrounds that are works of art in the eyes of photographer Amir Zaki: "They become more imaginative and open as spaces."
NPR2 min lettiPolitics
Cory Booker On Impeachment: 'I Swore An Oath To Protect And Defend The Constitution'
The New Jersey senator and presidential hopeful says Congress must take action. "Politics be damned. I have a job to do, which is to hold the executive accountable and we should be doing that."
NPR3 min lettiScience
Typhoon Hagibis Leaves 2 Dead As Flooding And Landslides Threaten More Lives
The typhoon, which has now passed to the northeast of Tokyo, was the largest to hit Japan in 61 years, since the 1958 Kanogawa Typhoon that killed more than 1,200 people.