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Brain Scans Find Differences But No Injury In U.S. Diplomats Who Fell Ill In Cuba

Advanced MRI scans of 40 embassy workers who developed health problems in Havana found no evidence to support claims that they were attacked or suffered brain injuries.
In 2016, dozens of people associated with the U.S. Embassy in Havana began reporting symptoms of what became known as "Havana syndrome." Source: Alexandre Meneghini

A close look at the brains of 40 U.S. Embassy workers in Cuba who developed mysterious symptoms has found no evidence of injury. The State Department has said the employees were hurt by some sort of attack.

Advanced brain imaging techniques did reveal some subtle differences in the workers' brains, says , a professor of radiology at the University of Pennsylvania and an author of published in this week's, the journal of the American Medical Association.

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