NPR

'How To Disappear' Condemns Online Visibility Without Truly Exploring It

Akiko Busch sets out to argue against visibility, "the common currency of our time." But she neglects to expose why she dislikes social media and networked culture.
How To Disappear: Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency by Akiko Busch Source: PR

Why does Akiko Busch hate the Internet? After reading her essay collection How to Disappear: Notes on Invisibility in a Time of Transparency, I should know. Sadly, I remain in the dark.

Busch, a practiced art and nature writer, dislikes social media and networked culture: that much is clear. What she neglects to explore is why.

Busch opens in a deer blind. Perched in a tree, she writes in beautiful, scientific detail about how humans, birds, bees, and deer experience nature. "The entire world is shining with, she sets out to argue against it.

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